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Course Clusters

Gen Ed Core Designations

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  • Communicating for Results

    This course cluster provides an overview of public speaking from the three perspectives: the speaker, the audience, and the occasion.

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  • Composition, Character, and Comedy

    This course cluster combines instruction in analytical writing with an introduction to virtue ethics. Various types of comedy from different time periods are analyzed from the perspective of virtue ethics. The concepts of virtue, vice, happiness, and character are thoroughly explored.

    (Click a course name below to view course details)

    • EN 101 Composition I

      This course offers instruction in the principles of written communication and practice in writing, with emphasis on paragraph construction and the essay form.
      University Syllabus

    • EN 260 Comedy on Stage and Screen

      The purpose of this course is to reveal the serious art that lies behind every successful comedy. The course analyzes the genre of comedy in its most hilarious and original manifestations in the theater, in movies, and on television. Classic and contemporary works are examined.
      University Syllabus

    • IGEN 160 Introduction to Virtue Ethics

      An introduction to that branch of ethics known as virtue ethics, this course focuses on the development of character through the cultivation of classical virtues. The insights of classical philosophy about the concepts of virtue, vice, character, the good, happiness, love, and justice are compared and contrasted with the insights of more contemporary philosophers.
      University Syllabus

  • Critical Thinking in the Real World

    Consists of three interrelated explorations of the nature, importance, and application of critical thinking to our everyday lives. IGEN 102 Using Critical Thinking with Mathematics and Statistics is an examination of how the power of numbers and logic can be used to understand and manage our thinking and deal with the world around us. IGEN 202 Using Critical Thinking to Understand Western Civilization provides critical perspectives on Western Civilization and Culture. IGEN 220 Using Critical Thinking to Understand Human Behavior applies critical thinking skills to many of the varied forms of human behavior including our own emotions and use of reason.

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    • IGEN 102 Using Critical Thinking with Mathematics and Statistics

      This course examines how the power of numbers can help explain our lives and the world around us, from scheduling delays, to amortization schedules, from compound interest to car loans, chance, voting patterns, gambling odds, and modern physics.
      University Syllabus

    • IGEN 202 Using Critical Thinking to Understand Western Civilization

      This course provides critical perspectives on Western Civilization and Culture. Besides examining the contributions of the Greeks, Romans, and Medieval and Renaissance Europeans, this course also investigates the Age of Science and Reason, the growth of democracy, modern capitalism and technology, and the Post-Modern world. Key concepts examined in the course include Western views of society, reason, mathematics, faith, science, religion, property, wealth, capitalism, progress, rights, democracy, and the state.
      University Syllabus

    • IGEN 220 Using Critical Thinking to Understand Human Behavior

      This course applies critical thinking skills to human behavior. Topics include the self in society, truth versus beliefs, human nature and its origins, love, sex, and friendship, personal and social morality, learning and creativity, work and recreation, law, government, democracy, change and progress, war and peace, thought about God, and hope for the future.
      University Syllabus

  • In Sickness and in Health

    This cluster examines relevant topics in anatomy, illness, and injuries in the context of the Hippocratic philosophy. Students will analyze the impact of germs on history, cultures and present day events in healthcare.

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  • Journeys of Awareness: Reading Books, People, and the Environment

    This course cluster uses contemporary temperament, intelligence, brain studies, and journey literature to analyze professional, personal, and literary environments. It also examines the fundamentals of summary, analysis, synthesis, and research-based writing, and provides opportunities for the intensive writing engagement that leads to significant solidification of writing skills.

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    • EN 102 Composition II

      This course offers instruction in three basic modes of composition: summary, critique, and synthesis. It also examines the methodology of research and applies summary, critique, and synthesis in the construction of a research-based essay. Prerequisites: EN 101
      University Syllabus

    • IGEN 292 Temperament and Intelligence

      This course examines temperament and intelligence as they relate to learning and future success. It uses temperament analysis, multiple intelligences, and distinctions between types of minds and neurobiology to contrast active and passive living.
      University Syllabus

    • IGEN 293 Journeys of the Human Spirit in the Arts

      This course examines literature and artwork representative of the varying journeys of the human spirit. It will emphasize the triumph of the spirit even in the face of bleak and desolate external landscapes.
      University Syllabus

  • The Kirkpatrick Signature Series

    The Kirkpatrick Signature Series is the intellectual linchpin of the General Education component of Bellevue University's institutional mission. The series focuses on the institutions and traditions of Western Civilization that have achieved unprecedented success in the United States, and it finds ground for intellectual, social, and cultural progress in the productive tensions between tradition and change, and freedom and responsibility. It highlights the importance of active citizenship in a rapidly changing world, one in which popular government, the Western tradition, and American values are sometimes severely tested. The series emphasizes intense involvement in active intellectual and experiential learning— affirming the values of limited government, popular rule, entrepreneurial processes, and reflective inquiry.

    The Kirkpatrick Signature Series fits an information age philosophy and reflects a dynamic approach to the complex realities of life in the 21st Century.

    Founded in 2008 as an extension of the Signature Series, the University's Center for American Vision and Values is an educational and research institute, dedicated to the exploration and promulgation of ideas and beliefs that have contributed to American exceptionalism.

    Through the Kirkpatrick Signature Series, lectures, debates, research, a Visiting Scholars Program, a student Junior Fellows Program, and other educational outreach initiatives, the Center for American Vision and Values examines, with academic, community, and corporate participants, the principles of free enterprise, limited government, individual freedom, and traditional American values and beliefs—values inherent in successful entrepreneurial and corporate cultures, as well as in the Midwestern ethic that has guided Bellevue University toward its success.

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    • LA 400 American Vision and Values

      This course focuses on the political and philosophical traditions of the Western world, especially as they are found in the American vision and are embedded in the values, traditions, documents, and institutions of the United States. Prerequisite: 60 Credit Hours
      University Syllabus

    • LA 410 Tradition and Change

      This course examines the theories of moral absolutism and moral relativism, in light of their relationship to citizen freedoms and responsibilities. The course compares several modern economic systems, accessing their impact on citizen freedom and responsibility. It also examines the importance of fulfilling citizens’ responsibilities for the well-being of society and for the freedoms they enjoy. Prerequisite: 60 Credit Hours
      University Syllabus

    • LA 420 Freedom and Responsibility

      This course examines the theories of moral absolutism and moral relativism, in light of their relationship to citizen freedoms and responsibilities. The course compares several modern economic systems, accessing their impact on citizen freedom and responsibility. It also examines the importance of fulfilling citizens’ responsibilities for the well-being of society and for the freedoms they enjoy. Prerequisite: 60 Credit Hours
      University Syllabus

Gen Ed Designations

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  • The African Experience

    The African Experience integrates the study of history, cultures, societies, and modern literature to provide a holistic view of this strategically important and richly varied continent. Students are introduced to recent African history, the societies and cultures of sub-Saharan Africa, and works by some of the best writers in Africa today.

    (Click a course name below to view course details)

    • IGEN 314 Recent African History

      This interdisciplinary course examines African history since 1600 with an emphasis on sub-Saharan Africa. Students use cultural studies and works of modern literature to help explore the historical complexities of this diverse continent.
      University Syllabus

    • IGEN 324 African Cultures

      This interdisciplinary course examines major cultural groups and modern societies of sub-Saharan Africa. Students use case studies, works of fiction, and historical analysis to gain a deeper appreciation for the challenges faced by African people in post-colonial times.
      University Syllabus

    • IGEN 334 Modern African Literature

      Students investigate African cultures and recent African history through literary works of Africa’s best modern writers.
      University Syllabus

  • Communication in Everyday Life

    This cluster of courses investigates the media, family, and health care as contexts of communication. Theories are examined in terms of each context. Emphasis is given to developing communication skills appropriate to the various contexts and to understanding contemporary issues that affect the contexts.

    (Click a course name below to view course details)

    • CA 203 Understanding Mass Media

      This course examines the origins, development, and current role of mass media in shaping and reflecting society. Emphasis is placed on informed, critical consumption of mass media products and processes. Prerequisite: CA 109
      University Syllabus

    • CA 315 Health Communication

      This course examines the theory and practice of health communication. Emphasis is placed on interpersonal relationships, social and cultural issues, and mediated messages concerning health communication. Prerequisite: CA 109
      University Syllabus

    • CA 320 Family Communication

      This course introduces concepts and case studies of communication related to the family. Provides a wide range of family communication models and theories related to functional families and positive communication. Competencies in the areas of conflict, interpersonal communication, ethics, and leadership are addressed. Prerequisite: CA 109
      University Syllabus

  • Consumer Nation: Why We Shop Until We Drop

    Trace the rise of American consumer culture from its origins in the Protestant Reformation, to the time of our nation's founding, through the Industrial Revolution, to its present expression in the shopping mall. Using interdisciplinary texts, you will explore the historical, economic, philosophic, social, cultural, and behavioral implications of this vital and dynamic economy. Topics include consumerism in world and American history, the cultural and social history of shopping, the rise of the department store and the shopping mall, the commoditization of value, and the transformation of American culture.

    (Click a course name below to view course details)

    • IGEN 301 The Origins of American Consumerism

      Explores the origins of American consumerism—how our nation achieved one of the world’s highest standards of per capita wealth by the time of its founding and today enjoys the highest standard of living in the world. The course identifies and analyzes economic, intellectual, historical, and philosophical influences that have shaped our consumer culture.
      University Syllabus

    • IGEN 311 The New Consumer Culture: The Department Store and the Dawn of Modern Advertising

      Traces the development of the new consumer culture from the Industrial Revolution to the birth of the department store, modern advertising, and the modern consumer economy. Investigates the story of this transformation of American culture by examining the historical, economic, philosophical, religious, and literary record.
      University Syllabus

    • IGEN 321 A Nation of Consumers: The “Malling” of America

      Investigates the shopping mall as an economic reality, as well as a transformational agent of American culture. The course traces the origins and growth of the American shopping mall as an agent and response to our vital consumer culture and examines the story of the shopping mall in the light of historical, economic, philosophical, and literary texts.
      University Syllabus

  • Corporate Communication

    Corporate communication professionals must have knowledge of and be able to manage an array of communication situations and media. In this course students will learn the basics of how to create messages and manage various corporate communication situations.

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    • CA 326 Introduction to Corporate Communication

      This course is designed to provide a foundation for understanding professional communication and for developing basic corporate communication skills. This course orients the student to essential features of communication and develops competencies in conceptualizing oral and written communication and problem solving. Prerequisite: CA 109
      University Syllabus

    • CA 400 Managing Internal Communication

      This course introduces the practices and principles of communicating with internal stakeholders—specifically employees. The course emphasizes interactive employee communication programs, strategies and the manager’s role in establishing an environment that encourages dialogue and the flow of information. Prerequisite: CA 109
      University Syllabus

    • CA 426 Building Effective Organizations

      This course focuses on training the competent communicator to train others in the organization. The course also emphasizes developing the skills necessary to design and develop interventions. Competencies include problem solving, coordinating and visioning. Prerequisite: CA 109
      University Syllabus

  • Effectively Communicating Yourself

    These courses combine to create opportunities for students to directly apply course material on how to communicate effectively with individuals and in group situations. Emphasis is placed on sensitivity to non-verbal message exchange in formal and informal professional situations. A number of communication events that require direct questioning will be reviewed to help students increase their interviewing skill. Presentation requirements will be addressed to assist students to formally present themselves and their message to both small and large audiences. Throughout the cluster, students will be guided to improve their performance in any communication event by focusing on intrapersonal, interpersonal, and audience-involving situations.

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    • CA 303 Nonverbal Communication

      This course addresses the application of nonverbal communication theories directed toward improved understanding of self and others in a variety of communication contexts. The course presents terminology, concepts, and models of nonverbal communication. Competencies in the areas of effective social interaction, intercultural awareness, conversational adaptability, self-awareness, and relational communication are addressed. Prerequisite: CA 109
      University Syllabus

    • CA 401 Professional Communication

      This course provides instruction on strategies, techniques and models of professional communication. Students will develop and apply skills at various communication levels and in a variety of contexts. Additionally, the course addresses competencies in the areas of persuasive speaking, organization of thought, planning and organizing, and ability to conceptualize. Prerequisite: CA 109
      University Syllabus

    • CA 404 Interviewing

      This course provides instruction in effective interviewing techniques and strategies while addressing models and concepts relevant to interviewing. Students will review interviewing competencies in the areas of managing conflict, decision-making, ethics, listening, interpersonal communication, and problem solving. Prerequisite: CA 109
      University Syllabus

  • Elder Care

    This cluster provides students a contrast of normal aging with the effects of disease on aging emphasizing psychosocial changes. Students will analyze the human resource and environment of care elements needed to provide care to the elderly in a variety of settings.

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    • HHS 315 Normal Aging and Disease Changes

      The student will contrast the normal changes of aging against those caused by disease or injury. This will include psychosocial changes and the effect of societal and economic pressures on the elderly.
      University Syllabus

    • HHS 320 Human Resource Management

      The student will develop policies that include federal, state, and local laws as they relate to resident care and employee interactions. They will analyze the aspects of planning, implementing and evaluation of recruitment, performance appraisal, training, marketing, confidentiality, and cultural diversity for healthcare employees.
      University Syllabus

    • HHS 330 Environment of Care (EOC) Management

      In this course the student will investigate three facets critical to long term healthcare facility management: Safety, Finance, and Patient Care including federal, state and local inspections and regulations.
      University Syllabus

  • Managing Diversity in the Workplace

    The workplace of today is diverse, dynamic, and highly competitive. Students in this cluster of courses learn how to work, manage, and lead more effectively in organizational cultures which embrace the opportunities and benefits of diversity in the workplace. Upon successful completion of this course cluster the student can request a "Certificate of Completion."

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    • IGEN 317 Working Towards a Culture of Inclusion

      As organizations move toward inclusion as a means of leveraging diversity, it is imperative that employees understand the importance of inclusion, as well as the ways in which culture and identity influence our perceptions and behaviors in the workplace. Important skills include self- and cultural awareness, viewing issues from multiple perspectives, and managing bias.
      University Syllabus

    • IGEN 318 Leading a Diverse Workforce

      An effective organization must create a culture which embraces diversity. Business leaders need to promote and communicate inclusive attitudes and policies in order to capitalize on a diverse labor force. Important skills include welcoming a pluralistic workforce, mentoring potential talents, evaluating performance objectively, and resolving cultural conflicts in the workplace.
      University Syllabus

    • IGEN 319 Creating Value from Diversity in the Workplace

      Globalization has increased competitive pressures and opened up new opportunities. Organizations must monitor political, legal, economic, and demographic trends which can alter the workplace environment for entire industries. At the organizational level, leaders need to gauge the impact of diversity initiatives and adjust strategies appropriately based on evidence from established metrics.
      University Syllabus

  • One World: Many People, Many Stories, Many Faiths

    This is an introduction to the many peoples, faiths, and cultures of the world. Special attention will be given to the geography, personal experiences, and religions of the family of humans.

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  • Perspectives of Human Communication

    These courses weave together communication theories and principles that cover many areas of life (personal, work, social) and provides opportunities to improve communication skills in a variety of contexts. Students will directly apply course material, address areas for personal improvement, and expand their range of appropriate and successful communication behaviors.

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    • CA 204 Interpersonal Communication

      This course introduces concepts and basic theories of interpersonal communication. Students will identify areas for personal improvement and for increasing their repertoire of communication behavior choices. Competencies in the areas of listening, perceiving, integrating, and conveying information are addressed. Prerequisite: CA 109
      University Syllabus

    • CA 304 Gender Communication

      This course provides a comprehensive view of gender communication as it relates to its prevalence and impact in society. Research of gender communication serves to enhance greater understanding of the oppressive nature of gender communication and its influence on society. Competencies in the areas of perception, adaptability, critical thinking, and innovation are addressed. Prerequisite: CA 109
      University Syllabus

    • CA 317 Psychology of Communication

      This course introduces theories and concepts that connect psychology and communication. Students are presented terminology, research opportunities, and direct application of social cognition skills required to be a competent communicator in an ever-changing world. Competencies in the areas of critical thinking, identifying manipulation and influence, detecting deception, and managing conflict are addressed. Prerequisite: CA 109
      University Syllabus

  • Socrates Meets Seinfeld and the Simpsons

    This course cluster examines three fundamental questions: What can we learn about ourselves and the culture in which we live from popular culture satire as presented in the media, especially television? What perspective does the history of human intellectual and technological achievement provide us for our lives in the present? Finally, how can we use the answers to the two questions above to help us live more fulfilling lives?

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  • Staying Human in a Digital World

    This nine credit course cluster examines the impact of emerging technologies on our ways of thinking, feeling, and living. Students should expect a fast-paced, entertaining, thought-provoking look at the effects of technology on modern life. The three courses investigate ways that people can harness technology to foster timeless human virtues of community, creativity, and communication, rather than reinforcing potentially dangerous trends toward computerized isolation, conformity, and confusion.

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    • IGEN 230 Digital Storytelling

      This course examines the processes and tools used in combining digital imagery and narration into a visual story. The application of storyboards, introductory level software, and the development of a personal voice will be used to develop a concept into a finished project.
      University Syllabus

    • IGEN 330 Societies in the Information Age

      The information age has brought fundamental changes in how people live, work, and play. This course provides students with a much-needed framework for understanding the ways in which technologies transform and are transformed by societies. Students will explore the impact of technologies, both past and present, on our human relationships and cultural institutions.
      University Syllabus

    • IGEN 331 Ethics, Privacy, and Quality of Life in a Digital World

      Technological innovations should prompt us to pause and consider questions of ethics, privacy, and quality of life before the innovations are embraced or rejected at home or at work. Accordingly, classroom activities, discussions, and assignments will prompt students to connect professional codes of ethics to the use of current and emerging technologies and reflect on the ethical and social issues being raised.
      University Syllabus

  • Triumph of the Nerds

    Both technical and non-technical students will enjoy this fast-paced look at the origins of the personal computer and the Internet and the profound effects on our society. Special emphasis is placed on the people and companies at the start of our technological revolution. Also, students investigate works of literature which explore the personal, cultural, ethical, and social implications of technology.

    (Click a course name below to view course details)

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