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Course Listing For Courses

  • AC 205 Financial Accounting

    This course is an introduction to accounting concepts and the elements of financial statements including basic accounting vocabulary and analysis of business transactions from an accounting viewpoint. Students will be required to recognize, record, and classify new accounting data. Emphasis is placed on corporate accounting. Introductory financial statement analysis and interpretation are also covered.
    Course Syllabus

  • AC 206 Managerial Accounting

    Managerial accounting is designed to introduce the fundamentals of managerial accounting to both accounting and non-accounting majors. It covers accounting and management decision making in both short-term and long-term strategic situations. Students will be expected to explain and apply accounting concepts including basic costing and processes, cost classifications, responsibility accounting and ethical behavior of the managerial accountant. Prerequisite: AC 205
    Course Syllabus

  • AC 311 Intermediate Accounting I

    This course is designed for students pursuing accounting or business careers and who are interested in gaining a more thorough knowledge of accounting principles and procedures to analyze financial data. Topics include concepts of future and present value, conceptual framework of accounting, study of cash and receivables, inventory measurement and valuation, and tangible operational assets as well as intangible assets. Prerequisites: AC 205 and CIS 101 or BA 222
    Course Syllabus

  • AC 312 Intermediate Accounting II

    This course is a continuation of AC 311 and is designed for those interested in gaining a more thorough knowledge of financial accounting principles and procedures. Topics include income recognition, long-term liabilities, shareholder equity and retained earnings, investments, leases, pensions, and derivatives. Prerequisite: AC 311
    Course Syllabus

  • AC 321 Cost Accounting

    This course will examine the theory and practice of cost accounting. Topics covered include cost accounting system, responsibility accounting, job order costing, process costing, variable costing, budgeting, cost variance, cost behavior analysis and decision-making processes. Students will have opportunities to experience how cost accounting is used within an organization through problem and case analyses. Prerequisites: AC 206 and BA 222 or CIS 101
    Course Syllabus

  • AC 331 Income Tax Accounting

    This course focuses on federal income tax provisions and procedures used to compute tax liability for individuals. Included in the course are the concepts of income tax determination, problems of computing gross income, deductions and losses, alternative minimum tax and tax credits, non-taxable exchanges, capital gains and losses, tax liability, and preparation of tax returns. Students will be expected to prepare basic tax forms and research tax issues using appropriate research materials. Prerequisite: AC 206
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  • AC 341 Accounting Information Systems

    This course provides an introduction to a systems view of accounting through accounting information systems (AIS) and how technology is used in AIS. Students will examine the process of developing information systems and develop knowledge of computer-based control and audit issues. Also included is the study of the five cycles of AIS and how the cycles are implemented in computer-based systems. Prerequisites: AC 206 and BA 222
    Course Syllabus

  • AC 396 Accounting Internship

    The course provides students with an opportunity to receive practical training in accounting. Prerequisites: (1.) Students must have junior or senior status. (2.) Students must complete 18 credit hours in residency in the College of Business. (3.) A minimum of 9 of the 18 hours must be in upper level (300-400) accounting courses. (4.) Students must have a minimum GPA of 3.0 in the College of Business. (5.) Faculty approval is required. (1 to 3 credit hours)
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  • AC 416 Advanced Accounting Problems

    This course covers advanced topics in financial accounting, such as: business combinations, partnership accounting, and fiduciary accounting. The course is designed to develop an understanding of purchase method of consolidation before introducing students to worksheet procedures for preparation of consolidated financial statements. Students will also prepare detailed reports required in the formation and dissolution of partnerships and in the accounting activities required as a fiduciary responsible for estates and trust. Prerequisite: AC 312
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  • AC 418 Accounting Theory

    This course looks at the development of accounting theory and explores its impact on past and current accounting practices. Emphasis will be placed on accounting research of FASB pronouncements and how this research can assist the users in developing skills to be used in finding solutions to the proper application of FASB pronouncements. Other areas of discussion will include the policy-making process, contemporary accounting issues, and international accounting. Prerequisite: 12 credit hours of accounting to include AC 312
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  • AC 419 International Accounting

    This course focuses on the study of current standards of practice in international financial accounting and a comparison of U.S. GAAP to practices in other countries. Emphasis is placed on understanding the importance of convergence of financial reporting and the adoption of international financial reporting standards, the role international accounting standards play in the global market place, and the impact of these standards on U.S. GAAP. The course also covers issues related to management decision-making in the global marketplace including transfer pricing, taxation, strategic planning, and control. Prerequisite: AC 312
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  • AC 424 Advanced Cost Accounting

    This course examines advanced managerial and cost accounting concepts. Discussion topics will include current managerial and cost accounting issues such as JIT, Balanced Scorecard, ABC accounting, strategic cost management, meaningful report writing for management, and quality and performance measurement. This course uses a “hands-on approach” encouraging participation and interaction through the use of computer projects, case studies, and classroom discussions. Prerequisite: AC 321
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  • AC 432 Advanced Tax Accounting

    The course introduces students to specialized areas of taxes, emphasizing business income tax procedures for partnerships, corporations and S corporations, as well as the estate tax, gift tax, and income taxation of estates. Sources and applications of federal tax law are also covered. Students will be expected to prepare basic business tax forms and research tax issues using appropriate research materials. Prerequisite: 3 hours of taxation or AC 331
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  • AC 433 Advanced Individual Income Tax Accounting

    This course covers advanced topics for the individual taxpayer including credits, Alternative Minimum Tax, passive activities and asset dispositions. Also covered are tax periods and accounting methods. Emphasis is placed on working with tax laws and on tax rules and procedures for the tax practitioner. The course also emphasizes tax research processes. Prerequisite: 3 hours of taxation
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  • AC 434 Taxation of Business Entities

    This course covers the creation, formation, and liquidation of C corporations as well as tax practices and ethics as they relate to C corporations. Also covered will be taxation across state lines, business tax credits, and international tax. Prereq: AC 331
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  • AC 435 Taxation of Flow-Through Entities

    This course will cover tax issues such as subchapter S corporations, partnerships, trusts and estates. The course will also cover tax planning issues, tax practice and ethics. Prerequisite: 3 hours of taxation
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  • AC 439 Tax Planning and Strategies

    This course looks at the tax impact of business decisions and is designed for the non-accountant. Topics discussed will include tax impact on investment decisions, tax practice issues and ethics. Prerequisite: AC 331

  • AC 442 Financial Auditing

    The course covers auditing techniques and procedures as prescribed by the Auditing Standards Board. Emphasis is placed on developing audit evidence, evaluating audit risks, and preparing audit reports. Also covered are other attest and non-attest engagements such as reviews and compilations. The course covers professional ethics, legal liability of the auditor and the impact of the PCAOB on the development of professional standards. Students will apply their understanding of the audit function in an assigned audit case. Prerequisite: 12 credit hours of accounting to include AC 312
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  • AC 443 Advanced Auditing

    AC 443 looks at topics beyond those covered in basic auditing classes including in depth study of current standards of practice in such areas as fraud detection and specialized attestation engagements. The course also emphasizes the ethical, legal, and regulatory environment of auditing. Prerequisite: AC 442
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  • AC 452 Accounting for Governmental and Non-Profit Entities

    Accounting for Governmental and Non-Profit Entities covers governmental accounting and the various funds associated with non-profit enterprises. This course is a study of accounting techniques as applied to federal and state governmental units, public school systems, colleges and universities, hospitals, voluntary and welfare organizations, and other non-profit organizations. Students will be expected to prepare basic financial statements for a sample government using a dual-track computerized accounting software package. Prerequisite: AC 312
    Course Syllabus

  • AC 499 Topics in Accounting

    This course explore(s) a special topic(s) not treated or briefly treated in other accounting courses. This course can be used to add a career component for your major. Prerequisites: Permission from Accounting Director and a minimum of 12 hours in accounting (1 to 3 credit hrs)

  • AC 618 Accounting Theory

    This course looks at the development of accounting theory and explores its impact on past and current accounting practices. Emphasis will be placed on basic accounting concepts, including the conceptual framework APB # 4 and ASOBAT. Other areas of discussion will include the policymaking process, contemporary accounting issues, and international accounting. Prerequisites: AC 312

  • AC 619 International Accounting

    This course focuses on the study of current standards of practice in international financial accounting and a comparison of U.S. GAAP to practices in other countries. Emphasis is placed on understanding the importance of convergence of financial reporting and the adoption of international financial reporting standards, the role international accounting standards play in the global market place, and the impact of these standards on U.S. GAAP. The course also covers issues related to management decision-making in the global marketplace including transfer pricing, taxation, strategic planning and control. Prerequisites: AC 312
    Course Syllabus

  • AC 624 Advanced Cost Accounting

    This course includes current managerial and cost accounting issues, such as Just in Time (JIT), balanced scorecard, Activity-Based Costing (ABC) accounting, strategic cost management, meaningful report writing for management, and quality and performance measurement. This course uses a “hands-on approach” encouraging participation and interaction through the use of computer projects, case studies, and classroom discussions. Prerequisites: AC 321 or MBA 642
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  • AC 633 Advanced Individual Tax Accounting

    This course covers advanced topics for the individual taxpayer including credits, Alternative Minimum Tax, passive activities and asset dispositions. Also covered are tax periods and accounting methods. Emphasis is placed on working with tax laws and on tax rules and procedures for the tax practitioner. Prereq: AC 331
    Course Syllabus

  • AC 634 Taxation of Business Entities

    This course covers the creation, formation, and liquidation of C corporations as well as tax practices and ethics as they relate to C corporations. Also covered will be taxation across state lines, business tax credits, and international tax. Prereq: AC 331
    Course Syllabus

  • AC 635 Taxation of Flow-through Entities

    This course will cover tax issues such as subchapter S corporations, partnerships, trusts and estates. The course will also cover tax planning issues, tax practice and ethics. Prereq: AC 331
    Course Syllabus

  • AC 639 Tax Planning and Strategies

    This course looks at the tax impact of business decisions and is designed for the non-accountant. Topics discussed will include tax impact on investment decisions, tax practice issues and ethics. Prereq: AC 331

  • AC 643 Advanced Auditing

    This course is designed to look at topics beyond those covered in basic auditing classes. Students study in-depth current standards of practice in areas such as fraud detection, internal and EDP auditing, and specialized attestation engagements. Also emphasizes the ethical, legal, and regulatory environment of auditing and theoretical issues. Prerequisites: AC 442
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  • AC 652 Accounting for Governmental and Non-Profit Entities

    This course covers governmental accounting and the various funds associated with non-profit enterprises including a study of accounting techniques as applied to federal and state governmental units, public school systems, colleges and universities, hospitals, voluntary and welfare organizations, and other non-profit organizations. Students will be expected to prepare basic financial statements for a sample government using a dual-track computerized accounting software package. Prerequisites: AC 312

  • AC 661 Seminar in Contemporary Accounting: Selected Topics

    This course covers special topics of financial accounting, auditing, tax, or managerial accounting. The specific topic(s) offered will be listed in the course schedules for the session during which the seminar is offered. This class is offered in a seminar format, focusing on discussion rather than lecture. Prerequisites: 12 hours of accounting
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  • AEDU 301 Foundations of Continuing Education and Training

    This course will cover the underlying issues and concerns faced by adult learners. It will provide the basic knowledge and skills for students involved in adult education and/or training. AEDU 301 will also help students gain a better understanding of how continuing education and training leads to improved performance in the classroom and the workplace.
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  • AEDU 311 Adult Learning Theory

    This course examines adult learning theory as it applies to factors that influence and facilitate adult participation and learning. This course also explores how differences influence learning, motivation, and curriculum development.
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  • AEDU 321 Learning Styles Fundamentals

    In this course, students will examine research related to learning styles and implications for curriculum and instruction. Students will gain insights to their own learning styles and will develop an understanding of various learning styles and how they relate to their own teaching style. This course will provide educators with concepts and tools to work with a variety of student learning styles. It will help them expand their repertoires and create inclusive learning environments for their students.
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  • AEDU 331 Critical Thinking and Evaluation

    This course challenges students to become more aware of their thought processes, helps them develop those processes, and helps them hone the skills necessary to engage in critical thinking behavior. Students will gain knowledge regarding their own critical thinking capabilities, as well as develop skills to help their constituents engage in critical thinking.
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  • AEDU 341 Classroom Instructional Methods and Delivery

    This course will provide an overview of delivery and facilitation skills necessary when working with small and large groups. Looks at how to develop and deliver successful learning outcomes and presentations utilizing various methods and approaches.
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  • AEDU 401 Electronic Instructional Methods and Delivery

    This course will provide an overview of the most recent technologies that are available to design and deliver effective learning programs for adults. It explores the benefits and limitations of various online learning techniques utilizing different online teaching instruction, and helps students determine the most appropriate applications for their forum.
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  • AEDU 411 Learning Assessment and Evaluation

    In this course, students will discover more about the evaluation process. They will engage in developing learning outcomes, objectives, and will develop processes to assess and evaluate their curriculum to determine if learning objectives and outcomes have been reached.
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  • AEDU 421 Instructional Design Process

    In this course, students will learn to determine the most appropriate methods necessary for designing educational/training processes to maximize the learning experiences and performance outcomes. This course focuses on assessing and improving teacher performance through instructional and non-instructional methods, utilizing active learning techniques, and engaging students both in class and online.

  • AEDU 431 Instructional Design Strategies

    In this course, students will learn how to apply the instructional design process and will integrate their ideas to develop instructional design strategies to create their own instructional methods and materials. They will also examine ways in which to assess student learning and their instructional strategies. At the completion of AEDU 421 and 431 students will have created or revamped a training or instructional program or course utilizing the process and strategies they have learned.

  • AN 331 Cultural Anthropology

    This course is a study of contemporary and historically recent human societies and cultures. The main focus is on studying the ways of living of particular groups, comparing diverse cultures to one another to look for universal principles in human culture, to understand how various dimensions of human life—economics, family, religion, art, communications, etc.—relate to one another in different cultures, and to try to understand the causes and consequences of cultural change. Major requirement for a BA in Sociology. Prerequisite: SO 101 or written permission from instructor.
    Course Syllabus

  • AR 101 Survey of Art to 1400

    This course surveys the major developments in painting, sculpture, and architecture in the Western world, including Stone Age, Mesopotamia, Egypt, Aegean, Greek, Roman, Early Christian, Byzantine, Migration, Romanesque, and Gothic. With AR 102, this course provides an introduction to the whole range of Western artistic creation and its form of human communication and experience.
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  • AR 102 Survey of Art since 1400

    This course surveys the major developments in painting, sculpture, and architecture in the Western world, including Early and High Renaissance in Italy and the North; Baroque; Rococo; 19th, Century Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, and Post- Impressionism; and into the 20th century. With AR 101, this course provides an introduction to the whole range of Western artistic creation and its form of human communication and experience.
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  • AR 104 Understanding Art

    This is course is a comprehensive survey of design elements and principles, introducing students to critical analysis of artwork, themes, and purposes of art. This course examines two- and three-dimensional media and notable artwork and people in the history of art.
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  • AR 111 Introduction to Drawing

    Acquaints the beginning art student with media and techniques of drawing and explores the concept of composition.
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  • AR 197 Introduction to Art Management

    This course is an overview of arts organizations and their management processes. Trends, leadership fundamentals, and career opportunities will be highlighted.
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  • AR 204 Introduction to Painting

    Oil or acrylic media are explored utilizing traditional and experimental techniques. Color theory and basic technique create a platform for independent projects and the inherent potential for self-expression.
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  • AR 206 Introduction to Sculpture

    This course explores the media techniques of modeling, carving, and constructivism. Topics include naturalism, obstraction, history, and social issues.
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  • AR 208 Introduction to Ceramics

    This course develops the basic hand-building processes and wheel-throwing techniques used in contemporary ceramics. The development of shapes and application of glazes is emphasized.
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  • AR 210 Beginning Photography

    This course introduces students to the basic techniques and possibilities of the digital photographic medium. The course is designed to develop the student's ability to think in terms of pictures and acquaint him or her with the components of a successful photograph. Students must furnish their own DSLR or digital point-and-shoot camera.
    Course Syllabus

  • AR 304 Intermediate Painting

    The exploration of traditional media and techniques begun in AR 204 continues with a further emphasis on visual communication of themes or concepts. Independent projects allow self-expression while directing students towards sophistication in visual approach and conceptual basis. Students work with the instructor to discuss progress and technical problems. Prerequisite: AR 204
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  • AR 306 Intermediate Sculpture

    This course begins with clay modeling techniques for developing three-dimensional images. These images are fully developed by the process of casting in metal, including chasing and patination. Other images will be carved from wood and stone. Prerequisite: AR 206
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  • AR 308 Intermediate Ceramics

    This course emphasizes the development of wheel-throwing skills on a wide variety of vessel forms. Techniques to enhance the forms with surface decorative textures and glazing also are developed. Prerequisite: AR 208
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  • AR 320 Egyptian Tombs and Treasures

    This course is a study of visual art in ancient Egypt, with emphasis on architecture, painting, sculpture, and the minor arts. The course examines why the ancient Egyptians invested such wealth and effort in the production of art and ways in which social, religious and historical changes relate to change in that art.
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  • AR 326 Masters of the Italian Renaissance

    This course is a study of the major artists and complex monuments of 15th and 16th century Italy. The course examines the decisive achievements of the great artists, including Botticelli, Da Vinci, Michelangelo, Bramante, Raphael, and Titian. Not offered every year.
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  • AR 332 History of Graphic Design

    A survey of graphic design from prehistory to today. The course emphasizes the evolution of graphic communication and places contemporary design in historical context.
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  • AR 338 Intermediate Hand-Built Ceramics

    This course emphasizes the development of hand-building skills in a wide variety of vessel and sculptural forms. Clay body formulation, glaze and staining techniques, and diversity in firing techniques are explored. Prerequisite: AR 208
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  • AR 340 Digital Enhancement Photography

    Students with an understanding of the basic fundamentals of photography and Photoshop will learn to expand their skills to produce creative, dramatic images. Projects will be given which require blending of traditional photographic techniques with advanced digital enhancement techniques. Prerequisites: AR 210 or AR 310 and ARCT 102.
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  • AR 365 The Business of Art

    This course is designed to introduce the career-minded student to professional practices in marketing, pricing, and managing client and agency relations. Students will learn about the realities of setting up and operating a studio in a given specialty or market by applying proper financial and legal principles.
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  • AR 404 Advanced Painting

    Theme and concept are explored through development of a cohesive portfolio of work, in which personal style develops using one medium. Prerequisite: AR 304
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  • AR 406 Advanced Sculpture

    Advanced work in three-dimensional forms, stressing experimentation and a developed aesthetic. Prerequisite: AR 306 or AR 346
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  • AR 408 Advanced Ceramics

    This course emphasizes the development of a personal vision through techniques of shape forming. Glazing and firing processes are perfected. Prerequisite: AR 308 or AR 338
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  • BA 222 Intermediate Computer Concepts and Applications

    This course is designed for College of Business students who have basic file management and office software skills. Course projects are designed for business problem solving and include document management, using spreadsheets for information processing, design and management of personal databases for automated data management, presentation, and integrating business communications. Prerequisite: Recommend prior computer knowledge

  • BA 232 Principles of Management

    This course examines the fundamental concepts, theories, principles, and techniques of management by integrating classical and modern perspectives with real-world experiences. Students are introduced to both traditional and contemporary views along the management function of planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. Management domains such as business ethics, business law, international management, organizational behavior, human resource management, operation management, organizational development and change, entrepreneurship, management information systems, and strategic management are also introduced, and their implications on students’ careers as managers are explored.
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  • BA 240 Critical Thinking and Decision Making Skills

    This course teaches critical thinking skills for lifelong development of the individual. The course examines individual critical thinking in its elements of rational reasoning, logic, intuition, experience, and reflection.

  • BA 252 Principles of Marketing

    This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of marketing. It covers the current marketing concepts and practical applications that will include the functions of product, price, place, promotion, and positioning. Additional emphasis will be given to multicultural and global marketing in the United States and internationally.
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  • BA 265 Legal Environment of Business

    This course is designed to introduce the student to the legal and regulatory process in which business decisions are made. The application of legal constraints to management decision making is examined through cases, hypothetical scenarios, and practical examples. While applying these concepts to business decisions, special emphasis is placed on the ethical issues faced by a decision maker.
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  • BA 312 Principles of Finance

    This course covers the basic principles, techniques, and institutional aspects of financial management in order to provide students applications of finance content similar to those encountered in a finance career. Topics include financial markets and environment, time value of money, bond and stock valuation, risk and return, financial statement ratio analysis, capital budgeting, financial planning and control, capital structure, dividend policy, and other fundamental finance issues. Prerequisites: AC 206, MA 240, and MA 102 or MA 120
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  • BA 323A Introduction to Management Science

    This course introduces quantitative models appropriate for business applications. Emphasis is on analytical thinking, applied business decision-making, and practical real-life problem solving. The course starts with an introduction to models and mathematical model building. Specific models and applications include: linear programming and its transportation, transshipment, and assignment topics; project management; deterministic models of inventory control; queuing theory and economic analysis of waiting lines; and forecasting with emphasis on time-series and causal models. Software will be applied, as appropriate, in solving large-scale problems. Prerequisites: MA 102 or MA 120 and MA 240
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  • BA 333 Human Resource Management

    This course examines the roles and functions of human resources management within modern business organizations. It describes, analyzes, and assesses human resources roles in operations and strategies. Topics include: recruitment, selection, training, performance appraisal, compensation management, legal compliance, workplace safety and health, and employee/employer rights. Prerequisite: BA 232
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  • BA 380 Shaping Smart Business Arrangements

    This course focuses on developing professional skills for making business decisions and for advising other acquisition team members in successfully meeting customers’ needs. Students will learn about the different Department of Defense (DoD) mission areas and the procurement alternatives for each. Knowledge management and information systems will be introduced as well. Small group exercises are designed to prepare the students to provide contracting support within the overarching business relationships of government and industry.
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  • BA 384 Mission Focused Contracting

    This course focuses on the entire acquisition process from meeting with the customer to completing the contract closeout process. Students can learn to apply leadership, problem solving, and negotiation skills. Using an integrated case study approach, students can apply the knowledge and skills gained in previous courses. Prerequisite: BA 380 or CON equivalent courses
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  • BA 402 Risk Management

    Fundamental principles and practices of risk management and insurance are addressed with an applied focus on risk management processes, rather than institutional and contractual details of the insurance industry. Topics include fundamental principles of risk management, such as risk identification; risk characterization; pricing of risk reduction techniques; risk retention; regulatory, legal and tax implications; insurance; and other hedging strategies. Additionally, personal, business, and public policy perspectives concerning life, health, property, and liability risk management and insurance are addressed. Prerequisite: BA 312
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  • BA 412A Intermediate Finance

    This course builds upon the introductory finance course. It addresses advanced applications and analysis of financial theory and practice. Aspects of the following topics are addressed: financial environments, financial analysis, cash flow, incentive theory and practice, time value of money, security valuation, risk analysis, portfolio theory and practice, capital budgeting, capital structure, dividend policies, options, global financial concerns, and contemporary financial issues. The course is designed to mimic experiences and applications found in certain finance careers. Prerequisite: BA 312
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  • BA 416A Investments

    Investment principles and practices are studied in the context of individuals or organizations operating in well- developed financial markets. The course will integrate accepted economic relationships and practices to provide students with an understanding of the current investment environment. Additionally, the course will survey the institutions and securities that make up the investment environment. Students will have an opportunity to understand and experience how individuals trade financial instruments, including: stocks, options, bonds, futures, and other derivative securities. Prerequisite: BA 312
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  • BA 417 International Finance

    This course will focus on international financial tools, applications and concepts. Topics covered include fundamental international financial relationships and their application to firms and individuals, international transactions, tax issues, and multinational corporations. The course will cover many essential elements of transacting in an international market place. The course addresses the fundamental risks inherent in international business and the use of financial securities to hedge these risks. Prerequisite: BA 312
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  • BA 420 Cash Management

    Cash Management, also known as treasury management, short-term financial management, or working capital management addresses fundamental principles and practices concerning cash management for businesses operating in today’s financial markets. This course challenges students to understand and assess fundamental principles, practices and applications relevant to efficient and effective cash management and to understand why cash management is a critical success factor for businesses of any type. Topics addressed: the role of cash management, credit, accounts receivable, collection management, accounts payable and disbursement management, electronic commerce, information and technology needs for cash management, forecasting, short term investments and borrowing, international cash management, relevant relationship management, and other contemporary issues. Prerequisite: BA 312
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  • BA 423 Business Modeling and Planning

    This course introduces modeling as a tool for decision making and planning. Emphasis is on understanding the mechanics of various models and their applications to business. Topics include: optimization models, network models, inventory control, waiting lines, decision theory, and multi-criteria decision models. Large-scale problem solving is facilitated through use of software. Prerequisite: BA 323A
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  • BA 426 Managing Operations in a Changing Economy

    This course will examine the operations component of the organization. Cases in production and operations settings will be examined that require the use of quantitative methods and approaches to decision making within an environment of scarce/limited resources. Additional topics such as production technology, product/process design, facility layout, materials and capacity requirements planning, and quality control are included. Computer software is used to generate answers for further analysis. Prerequisite: BA 323A or BA 423
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  • BA 433 Organizational Behavior

    This course is designed to encourage the application of diverse conceptual and theoretical perspectives to the analysis and control of behavior in organizations. The course will focus on problems related to perception, motivation, leadership, cultural diversity, interpersonal and group conflict, stress, influence, decision-making, work family balance, ethics, international management issues, and change. Prerequisite: BA 232
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  • BA 436 Compensation and Performance Management

    This course examines current theory, research and practice necessary to make effective strategic decisions in managing compensation and performance issues. Included in this course will be a detailed look at contemporary compensation systems and strategies, job analyses and performance evaluations. Also includes how to design wage and salary structures and benefit packages in order to be competitive in today’s organizations. Prerequisite: BA 232
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  • BA 437 International and Global Business

    This course examines the approaches and systems that firms use in international and global businesses operations. This includes the examination of international trade theory, tariffs and regulations systems, financial exchange systems, political and legal systems, and cultural value systems. Prerequisites: BA 232 and BA 252
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  • BA 438 Human Resource Law

    This course describes, analyzes, and evaluates legal foundations, cases, and applications of human resource law. Areas of law covered will include equal employment opportunity law, labor relations law, fair employment practices law, and compensation-benefits law. Human resource management practices will be considered within analysis and evaluation of laws, cases, and settlements. Prerequisite: BA 265
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  • BA 439 Business Policy and Strategy

    The course emphasizes research and analysis of external and internal forces that impact the organization and strategic success as well as action-implementing tools that are used to integrate the organization’s scope, strategies, and policies. External factors include competitive analysis, customer trends, political, legal and technological factors. Internal factors include analysis and evaluation of current business strategies, organizational systems, resource deployment, and culture. The course culminates the undergraduate business program with the capstone project. Prerequisite: Senior standing (preferably, this course should be taken in the student’s final semester)
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  • BA 446 Strategies for Recruitment and Selection of Human Resources

    This course is designed for students who desire to understand and master the intricacies associated with the recruitment and selection of human resources and practices, validity and reliability in testing, legal and regulatory factors affecting selection practices, making employment offers, and practices to ensure equal employment opportunity and affirmative action. Prerequisite: BA 232
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  • BA 450 Business Ethics

    This course examines the fundamental concepts, theories, principles and practices of ethics in management by integrating classical and modern perspectives with real world experiences. Students are introduced to traditional and contemporary ethical views along with opportunities for practical application. Ethical domains such as utilitarianism, Kantianism, feminist ethics, subjective ethics and corporate ethical practices will be discussed. Special examination will be made of global ethical practices in today’s business environment. Prerequisite: Senior standing
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  • BA 455 Internet Marketing

    This course examines the nature, characteristics, and culture of the online environment to understand, develop, and implement marketing strategies and tactics for conducting effective online commerce. Emphasis is on the hardware/software tools necessary for Internet-based commerce, encompassing the basic marketing principles that allow marketing professionals to execute marketing strategy in the dynamic computer mediated environment. Prerequisite: BA 252
    Course Syllabus

  • BA 456 International Consumer Behavior

    This course is to introduce International Consumer Behavior, with emphasis on developing a customer focus and competitive advantage by using consumer behavior analysis. The goal is to understand what effects stemming from internal and external influences affect the consumer decision making process in the global economy. Identifying customer behaviors leads to designing products/services to meet their needs and wants consistent with the different consumer characteristics found throughout the global marketplace. Prerequisites: BA 232 and BA 252
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  • BA 458 Sales Management

    This course examines development, structure, and implementation of an effective and profitable sales force across substantially different environmental conditions. Strategies involving various markets, sales person characteristics, sales program design, and quantitative measurements are emphasized. Prerequisite: BA 252
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  • BA 463 Global Brand Marketing

    This course provides a framework for defining brand equity and identifying sources and outcomes of brand equity along with developing a tactical guideline for building, measuring, and managing brand equity. Emphasis is on building a common denominator to interpret the potential effects and trade-offs of various strategies and tactics for brands. Managing brand equity between what happened to the brand in the past and what should happen to it in the future is explored. Students gain career experience by creating brand strategies and developing a strategic brand audit. Prerequisite: BA 252

  • BA 465A Business Law

    This course examines and explores laws relevant to business activity. Study will focus on areas of law developed specifically for business and business relationships. Topics include: the legal environment of business, contracts, debtor-creditor relationships, agency relationships, and property law. Prerequisite: BA 265
    Course Syllabus

  • BA 467 International Law

    This course examines basic international laws with the goal of helping students understand the structure within which states, organizations, and individuals function in a global environment. The international framework will be analyzed and contrasted with the framework governing domestic relationships. Customs and norms will be explored, along with ethical and moral concerns, issues in human rights, environmental considerations, and social responsibility considerations.
    Course Syllabus

  • BA 482 Intermediate Contracting for Mission Support

    This course is a case study wherein students apply the knowledge and skills learned in the previous contracting courses. Students demonstrate their ability to develop and execute business strategies to meet customer requirements. This case helps to develop critical thinking; customer needs analysis, procurement strategy development, and source selection skills necessary for successful contract performance. Prerequisites: BA 380 and BA 384 or CON equivalent courses

  • BA 483 Cost Analysis and Negotiation Techniques

    This course focuses on cost analysis and negotiation techniques and topics including cost analysis, quantitative techniques, indirect cost, estimating and accounting systems audits, facilities capital cost of money (FCCM), profit analysis and negotiations. The course includes a practical application of acquisition planning, cost analysis, negotiation and contract administration. This is a Defense Acquisition University (DAU) equivalent course.
    Course Syllabus

  • BA 484 Advanced Contracting For Mission Support

    Students will apply acquisition planning, cost analysis, negotiation and contract administration concepts/theories/methods/techniques. The following topics are also examined: supply case study, cradle to grave operations, incentive contract, cost analysis, negotiations, presentations, legal issues and contract management. Prerequisite: BA 482 or CON equivalency courses
    Course Syllabus

  • BA 485 Internship in Business Administration

    This course provides an opportunity for students to expand their learning by gaining experience in the workplace. The learning objectives and specific program of study must be developed in consultation with the College of Business. The internship application must be approved in advance of registering for the course. Contact the College of Business office for details. Prerequisites: 1. Students must have junior or senior status. 2. Students must complete 18 credit hours in residency in the College of Business. 3. A minimum of 9 of the 18 hours must be in upper level (300-400) accounting courses. 4. Students must have a minimum GPA of 3.0 in the College of Business. 5. Faculty approval is required. 18 hours of BA related courses (1 to 3 credit hrs)
    Course Syllabus

  • BA 489 Advanced Business Solutions for Mission Support

    Through realistic scenario-based learning, students work in teams to practice developing sound business solutions as a valued strategic and expert business advisor. Coursework is designed to contribute to senior leadership and local supervisors and to provide resources for the contracting career field via the course community of practice. Prerequisite: Level II certification or CON equivalent courses
    Course Syllabus

  • BA 499 Topics in Business Administration

    Exploration of special topics not treated or treated only briefly in other courses. This course can be used to add a career component to your major. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing (1 to 3 credit hrs)

  • BA 602 Risk Management

    This courses includes fundamental principles and practices of risk management and insurance with an applied focus on risk management processes rather than institutional and contractual details of the insurance industry. Topics include risk identification; risk characterization; pricing of risk reduction techniques; risk retention; regulatory, legal and tax implications; insurance; and other hedging strategies. Additionally, personal, business, and public policy perspectives concerning life, health, property, and liability risk management and insurance are addressed. Prerequisites: MBA 600, and MBA 610
    Course Syllabus

  • BA 616A Investments

    Investment principles and practices are studied in the context of individuals and organizations. The course will integrate economic relationships and practices for an understanding of the current investment environment. Additionally, the course will survey the institutions and securities that make up the investment environment to provide students a history of how Wall Street operates. Students should learn to understand and experience how individuals trade financial instruments, including stocks, options, bonds, futures, and other derivative securities. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610
    Course Syllabus

  • BA 617 International Finance

    This course will focus on international financial tools, applications, and concepts. Topics include fundamental international financial relationships and their application to firms and individuals, international transactions, tax issues, and multinational corporations. It will cover essential elements of transacting in an international market place. It also will address the fundamental risks inherent in international business and the use of financial securities to hedge these risks. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610
    Course Syllabus

  • BA 620 Cash Management

    Cash management also may be known as treasury management, working capital management, or short-term financial management. This course addresses fundamental principles and practices concerning cash management. Topics include the role of cash management, credit, accounts receivable and collection management, accounts payable and disbursement management, electronic commerce, information and technology needs for cash management, forecasting, short-term investments and borrowing, international cash management, relevant relationship management, and contemporary issues. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610
    Course Syllabus

  • BA 623 Business Modeling and Planning

    This course introduces modeling as a tool for decision-making and planning. It provides the foundation to understand various analytical models and prepares students to apply them to manage and solve real-life business problems. Topics include: optimization models, network models, inventory control, waiting lines, decision theory and multi-criteria decision models. Large-scale problem solving is facilitated through software applications. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610
    Course Syllabus

  • BA 636 Compensation and Performance Management

    This course examines current theory, research, and practice necessary to make effective strategic decisions in managing compensation and performance issues. Included in this course is a detailed look at contemporary compensation systems and strategies, job analysis, and performance evaluations. Also includes how to design wage and salary structures and benefit packages in order to be competitive in today’s organizations. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610
    Course Syllabus

  • BA 637 International and Global Business

    This course surveys international and global business issues, processes, and strategies. The course describes and assesses (a) issues that surround business and market opportunities, such as cultural, economic, legal, political, and technological differences, (b) international trade and monetary systems, and (c) strategies, structures, and processes used by successful international and/or global businesses and organizations. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610
    Course Syllabus

  • BA 638 Human Resource Law

    This course describes, analyzes, and evaluates legal foundations, cases, and applications of human resource law. Areas of law covered will include, but are not limited to, equal employment opportunity law, labor relations law, fair employment practices law, and compensation-benefits law. Human resource management practices will be considered within analysis and evaluation of laws, cases, and settlements. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610

  • BA 646 Strategies for Recruitment and Selection of Human Resources

    This course is designed for students who desire to understand and master the intricacies associated with the recruitment and selection of human resources and practices, validity and reliability in testing, legal and regulatory factors affecting selection practices, making employment offers, and practices to ensure equal employment opportunity and affirmative action. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610

  • BA 655 Internet Marketing

    This course examines the nature, characteristics, and culture of the online environment to understand, develop, and implement marketing strategies and tactics for conducting effective online commerce. Emphasis is on the hardware/software tools necessary for Internet-based commerce, market segmentation identification, product development, pricing, direct marketing, global marketing, and the methodology to execute marketing strategy in a computer mediated environment. Prerequisites: MBA 652
    Course Syllabus

  • BA 656 International Consumer Analysis

    This course provides a review of the classical areas of perceptions, cognition, attitudinal formation, and cultural influences that affect individual and group purchasing behaviors. Emphasis is placed on understanding marketplace dynamics, market segmentation, and understanding the importance of psychographics in market planning analysis. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610 and MBA 652
    Course Syllabus

  • BA 658 Sales Management

    This course examines development, structure, and implementation of an effective and profitable sales force across substantially different environmental conditions. Strategies involving various markets, sales person characteristics, sales program design, and quantitative measurements are emphasized. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610 and MBA 652

  • BA 663 Global Brand Marketing

    This course provides a framework for defining brand equity and identifying sources and outcomes of brand equity along with developing a tactical guideline for building, measuring, and managing brand equity. Emphasis is on building a common denominator to interpret the potential effects and trade-offs of various strategies and tactics for brands. Managing brand equity between what happened to the brand in the past and what should happen to it in the future is explored. Students gain experience by creating brand strategies and developing a strategic brand audit. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610 and MBA 652
    Course Syllabus

  • BAMC 300 Business Communications and Research

    This course will facilitate students developing competency in research and planning methods by conducting an analysis of a topic germane to the students’ professional interests. Students will be able to apply specific standards used in the business world for both written and oral communication. Students will examine ethical standards as it relates to research and writing. The methodology for research and planning is explored and utilized to develop a proposal for the Capstone Project.
    Course Syllabus

  • BAMC 310 Business Intelligence

    This course is designed to improve the application of business intelligence within the corporate structure. The student will study and analyze the key themes in the nature of business intelligence to include system architecture, databases, data warehouses, performance management, methodologies, and other related topics. The student will be exposed to case studies allowing the learner to evaluate the relevance to contemporary settings and to recognize the model for describing, analyzing, and responding to organization, system, and management problems. The course will examine emerging efforts to use business intelligence to improve decision-making, enhance strategic position, and sustain competitive advantage. Theory is applied and expanded as needed to a broader social context, engaging the student in a thorough understanding in the development of business intelligence.
    Course Syllabus

  • BAMC 320 Strategic Management

    The course will cover world-class organizations, the guerrilla view of competitive advantage, online communities, data mining, real options theory, and several others. It will introduce the concepts of strategic management such as competitive advantage, Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT analysis), corporate growth, and strategy implementation. The course will include several case studies that will allow the student to better evaluate the importance of how strategic management integrates in the technology industry.
    Course Syllabus

  • BAMC 330 Managing and Using Information Systems

    This course will provide insights and knowledge needed to formulate and understand information systems (IS) decisions. The course will clarify and elaborate how information technology (IT) relates to organizational design and business strategy. It will review ethical standards as these relate to IS today.
    Course Syllabus

  • BAMC 340 Foundations of Business Analysis

    This is an introductory course designed to provide a basic understanding of the benefits, functions and impact of the Business Analyst. The course will place a special focus on the business analysis function as it relates to developing information technology solutions, given that such an understanding is essential for project success. The course will identify techniques for ensuring project success every step of the way - from identifying and analyzing potential projects, to making sure the final project product meets the requirements identified.
    Course Syllabus

  • BAMC 400 Business Requirements and Analysis

    This course will outline the roles and responsibilities of the business analyst and the process for analyzing business systems, including how to determine a business system's health. The course will identify skills and techniques to translate customer needs into project requirements that provide a framework for identifying business problems, and linking requirements to business objectives in order to solve business problems and set project scope.
    Course Syllabus

  • BAMC 410 Process Mapping and Project Design

    The course will outline what processes are and provide practical applications for each step in process mapping. The course will cover the complete cycle of business process mapping and how these processes link business objectives, risks, and measures of success to the process being mapped.
    Course Syllabus

  • BAMC 420 Business Process Modeling

    This course will introduce what processes are and provide practical applications for each step in process modeling in the Business Analyst’s role. The course will cover the complete cycle of business process modeling and how these processes link business objectives, risks, and measures of success to the process being modeled.
    Course Syllabus

  • BAMC 430 Project Management

    This course will examine current trends in project management. Cost analysis and time structures will be examined to review issues that arise during project planning and implementation. The course will identify tools such as Gantt and PERT charts that will illustrate methods used to implement and successfully complete technology projects. Capstone projects are due at the end of the course.
    Course Syllabus

  • BAN 300 Base SAS Programming

    This course is designed as the entry point to learning SAS programming, analytics programming concepts and environments. It provides the tools necessary to write SAS programs to perform data management, analysis, and reporting. The objective of this course is to provide the skills necessary to create and document data sets, manage and reshape data, write simple reports, and compute basic statistics on data set variables. Hands-on exercises designed to facilitate understanding of all the topics are included. The course also provides the basis for more advanced work in data analytics and advanced programming techniques for data management. This course aligns with the SAS Base Programming certification concepts. Prerequisite: MA 240

  • BAN 301 Enterprise Data and Information Management

    This course offers an in-depth exploration of all the major topics in the field of data and information management from an applied perspective. The course is designed to provide not only a strong theoretical foundation, but also the technical skills required in analyzing, designing, implementing, managing, and utilizing information repositories. Topics covered include relational database model, data modeling, logical and physical database design, structured query language (SQL) implementation, procedures and triggers, data integration and quality, data warehouses and database administration. This course explores data and information management related issues in the context of business organizations; therefore, strategic roles that data and information play in business operations, customer relationship management, business decision-making, and strategy development are also discussed.
    Course Syllabus

  • BAN 400 Introduction to Business Analytics

    As the market demand for professionals with data management, analytical and problem-solving skills increases, this course provides an analytical toolset to address modern, data-intensive business problems. Using a case-based approach, the course provides an overview of the key concepts, applications, processes and techniques relevant to business analytics. The course makes use of the leading software products to illustrate the use of business analytics methodologies to enhance business decision-making. Anyone who is interested in learning how to make intelligent use of data in a proactive way to impact organizational performance, driving new behaviors from customers and suppliers, and stride ahead of the competition would benefit from this course. Prerequisite: BAN 300

  • BAN 401 Data Warehousing and Mining Applications

    As business organizations collect more and more data as a byproduct of their operations, decision-makers are beginning to proactively and systematically analyze these data to improve decision quality. This course focuses on the two key processes of business analytics: data warehousing and data mining. The course provides an in-depth discussion on the modeling, design and implementation of data warehouses and other relevant techniques for addressing big data issues in organizations today. Data mining is the process that uses a variety of data analysis tools to discover patterns and relationships in data that may be used to make proactive, knowledge-driven decisions. The course provides an in-depth discussion on various techniques of data mining including predictive modeling, pattern recognition, prescriptive analytics, and text mining. Both the theoretical and practical aspects of data warehousing and mining are discussed in this course. Prerequisite: BAN 400

  • BAN 500 SAS Programming for Business Analytics

    This course is designed to provide a foundation of SAS analytics programming concepts and environments. It provides the tools necessary to write SAS programs to perform data management, analysis, and reporting. Topics include creating and documenting data sets, managing and reshaping data, writing reports, computing statistics on data set variables, and performing effective SAS programming. Hands-on exercises designed to facilitate understanding of all the topics are included. The course also provides the basis for more advanced work in data analytics and advanced programming techniques for data management. This course aligns with the SAS Base Programming certification concepts offered through the SAS Institute, Inc. Prerequisite: MA 240 or equivalent

  • BAN 520 Enterprise Data and Information Management

    This course offers an in-depth exploration of all the major topics in the field of data and information management from an applied perspective with an emphasis on data warehouses. The course is designed to provide not only a strong theoretical foundation, but also the technical skills required in analyzing, designing, implementing, managing, and utilizing information repositories. Topics covered include relational database model, data modeling, logical and physical database design, structured query language (SQL) implementation, procedures and triggers, data integration and quality, data warehouses and other relevant techniques for addressing big data issues in organizations today. The strategic roles that data and information play in business operations, customer relationship management, business decision-making, and strategy development are also discussed.
    Course Syllabus

  • BAN 600 Advanced Business Analytics

    As the market demand for professionals with data management, analytical and problem-solving skills increases, this course provides an analytical toolset to address modern, data-intensive business problems. To be effective in a competitive business environment, a business analytics professional needs to be able to use analytical tools to translate information into decisions and to convert information about past performance into reliable forecasts. Using a case-based approach, the course provides an overview of the key concepts, applications, processes and techniques relevant to business analytics. The course makes use of the leading software products to illustrate the use of business analytics methodologies to enhance business decision-making. Prerequisite: BAN 520, For MSMIS students: Completion of CIS 628 satisfies this prerequisite.

  • BAN 620 Advanced Data Mining Applications

    As business organizations collect more and more data as a byproduct of their operations, decision-makers are beginning to proactively and systematically analyze these data to improve decision quality. This course focuses on topics relevant to data mining, which is the process that uses a variety of data analysis tools to discover patterns and relationships in data that may be used to make proactive, knowledge-driven decisions. The course provides an in-depth discussion on various techniques of data mining including predictive modeling, pattern recognition, prescriptive analytics, and text mining. Both the theoretical and practical aspects of data mining are discussed in this course. Prerequisite: BAN 600.

  • BANK 300 Banking Foundation

    Overview of bank operations to include organizational structure, regulatory environment, profit generation and growth strategies. Banking activities including retail, commercial, investment, and international banking products and services are introduced.
    Course Syllabus

  • BANK 310 Banking Organization

    Alignment of a bank’s goals and objectives to Key Performance Indicators are discussed in relation to leadership strategies, management approaches and departmental goal development. Key performance indicators measuring bank performance including sales levels, fraud losses and cross-selling are examined relative to developing departmental goals and individual performance objectives.
    Course Syllabus

  • BANK 315 Service Quality

    Service plan and service-level diagnostics are employed to assess client loyalty, service quality and productivity impact. Analysis of service, direct sales, and cross-sell referral strategies to optimize operational levels are addressed.
    Course Syllabus

  • BANK 320 Bank Operations and Regulations

    Evaluation of bank security, regulations, risks, fraud and overall banking operational procedures. Case analyses of operational situations are used to analyze compliance strategies which mitigate organizational threats and risks.
    Course Syllabus

  • BANK 330 Market Segmentation in Banking

    Exploration of value creation marketing strategies specific to the banking industry and the use and analysis of market data to assess competition, operational excellence, benchmarks and product mix.
    Course Syllabus

  • BANK 400 Leading a Team

    Application of leadership approaches and management tools designed to motivate bank team members to realize enhanced client growth and operational efficiencies including techniques for effective observational coaching and feedback.
    Course Syllabus

  • BANK 420 Financial Analysis

    Industry-specific financial reporting documents including the annual report, balance sheet, income statement, and net worth statement are introduced and analyzed. Also emphasized is the application and analysis of key financial ratios measuring growth and fiscal stability.
    Course Syllabus

  • BANK 430 Strategic Planning

    Focuses on approaches to and elements of the strategic planning within banking operations. Included is strategic plan development which focuses on cost management, expansion of existing and development of new client relationships. Also included are organizational and internal cultural influences on strategic plan development and deployment.
    Course Syllabus

  • BANK 440 Facilitating Bank Success Capstone

    The capstone project integrates work from previous courses into a comprehensive portfolio. It will demonstrate strong competence in bank operations and management, regulation and compliance practices and the strategic leadership skills necessary to develop team members and build customer relationships.

  • BHMC 313 Health Information Technology

    This course examines the use of health information technology (HIT) in healthcare organizations. Basic HIT concepts and the use of HIT in various organizational settings will be covered.
    Course Syllabus

  • BHMC 323 Operations Management

    This course examines basic healthcare operations management functions and applicability within a variety of organizations. Specific competencies necessary for effectively managing the business operations area of healthcare organizations are addressed.
    Course Syllabus

  • BHMC 333 Human Resources in Healthcare

    This course focuses upon the importance of recruiting, selecting and retaining qualified healthcare professionals. Various models, concepts, and case studies relevant to employment practices and issues within healthcare are presented. The integral role Human Resources play in healthcare organizations is emphasized.
    Course Syllabus

  • BHMC 343 Applied Statistics for Healthcare Managers

    This course provides an introduction to the application of statistical methods within the context of healthcare. Research articles are critically examined providing familiarity with best practices and evidence-based decision making.
    Course Syllabus

  • BHMC 345 Evidence-based Practice for Healthcare Managers

    The focus of this course is on the consumership of healthcare research and the application of evidence-based practice for healthcare managers. This course introduces types of research methodologies, data collection, analysis of data, and the interpretation and application of best practices for organizations.

  • BHMC 353 Marketing Healthcare Services

    This course provides a thorough examination of the principles and concepts of marketing as applied to healthcare organizations and healthcare services. Topics include an overview of the marketing process, consumer behavior, branding and the application of market research and analysis. The practices of product strategies, product pricing, and customer service, as essentials in healthcare, are emphasized.
    Course Syllabus

  • BHMC 413 Fiscal Management

    This course introduces financial management vocabulary, concepts, and accounting principles necessary for effective resource utilization required within healthcare roles. Operating and capital budgets, chart of accounts, and responsibility reports are explored. Practical application will include using healthcare information to prepare a capital and operational budget.
    Course Syllabus

  • BHMC 423 Legal and Regulatory Issues

    This course explores the complex legal system and emerging issues of healthcare regulation. Course discussion includes healthcare regulatory compliance and legal and ethical situations that directly apply to the healthcare environment. Practical application will include preparation of a Code of Ethics to emphasize the potential for unethical and illegal situations within healthcare.
    Course Syllabus

  • BHMC 433 Principles of Healthcare Management

    This course discusses management principles and practice within healthcare organizations. Topics include basic principles related to motivating employees, performance management, and communication. Practical application will include critiquing current managerial practices in a variety of healthcare organizations.
    Course Syllabus

  • BHMC 443 Capstone Project

    This BHMC program culminates with the capstone project where a major healthcare management topic relative to a specific organization is explored and completed. The practical application will synthesize prior course information and sharpen research skills throughout the capstone project.
    Course Syllabus

  • BI 101 General Biology I

    This course provides the general foundation in biological science necessary for further study in the life sciences and allied health fields; it also serves to introduce the nonscientist to major areas of interest in the biological sciences. Topics include: the scientific method, cell structure, function and metabolism, introductory genetics, and ecology. A laboratory component supports the lecture material and allows students to perform simple experiments. (3 credit hrs lecture; 1 credit hr lab)
    Course Syllabus

  • BI 102 General Biology II

    This course presents an introduction to modern biology with a survey of the diversity of life. Greatest emphasis will be on the structure and function of Eukarya, specifically animals, plants, fungi, and protists. A laboratory component supports and amplifies the lecture material and allows the student to perform simple experiments. (3 credit hrs lecture; 1 credit hr lab)
    Course Syllabus

  • BI 201 Anatomy and Physiology I

    The course introduces basic concepts, anatomical terminology, cell structure and function and histology. This will be followed by an in-depth study of the anatomy and physiology of the following organ systems of the human body: Integumentary, arthrology, muscular, cardiovascular and lymphatic systems. A mandatory laboratory component supports and amplifies the lecture material and allows the student to study microscopic anatomy on slides and to perform dissection on representative animal models. An online component allows the student to practice course content with additional exercises. (3 credit hrs lecture; 1 credit hr lab)
    Course Syllabus

  • BI 202 Anatomy and Physiology II

    The course consists of an in-depth study of the gross and microscopic anatomy and the physiology of the following organ systems of the human body: The central and peripheral nervous, endocrine, sensory, respiratory, digestive, reproductive, and excretory systems. A mandatory laboratory component will support and amplify the lecture material and allow the student to perform dissection on representative animal models. An online component will allow the student to practice course content with additional exercises. Prerequisites: BI 201 or Instructor permission (3 credit hrs lecture; 1 credit hr lab)
    Course Syllabus

  • BI 204 Human Genetics

    This course is designed to teach Mendelian and modified Mendelian inheritance including: genotypic and phenotypic variability, DNA replication, protein synthesis and genetic abnormalities.
    Course Syllabus

  • BI 206 Nutrition Through the Life Span

    This course consists of the study of the nutrients required by the human body, the foods from which they are obtained, their utilization by the body and their importance for the maintenance of optimal health throughout the life span. 3 credit hours
    Course Syllabus

  • BI 210 Zoology

    This course is designed to provide an overview of invertebrate and vertebrate zoology including: classification, development, morphology, anatomy, and physiology of the animal phyla. (3 credit hrs lecture; 1 credit hr lab)
    Course Syllabus

  • BI 211 Botany

    This course consists of the study of the structure, physiology, histology, ecology, and economic importance of plants. A mandatory laboratory component will support and amplify the lecture material and allow the student to study live and preserved specimens. An online component will allow the student to practice course content with additional exercises and quizzes. (3 credit hrs lecture; 1 credit hr lab)
    Course Syllabus

  • BI 215 Controversies in Science and Medicine

    Exploration of current concerns, debates and novelties in science and medicine including: ecology, application of the scientific method, DNA technology, scientific models and medical technologies. 3 credit hours
    Course Syllabus

  • BI 303 Microbiology

    General, medical, ecological, and applied microbiology including: bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, and helminthic organisms. Prerequisites: BI 101 and BI 102 or BI 201 and BI 202 or equivalent (4 credit hrs lecture; 1 credit hr lab)
    Course Syllabus

  • BI 306 Biochemistry

    Fundamentals of modern biochemistry including such topics as molecular biology, the synthesis and metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, the study of energy metabolism, enzymes, genetic coding, and other current topics in the field. (4 credit hrs lecture; 1 credit hr lab)
    Course Syllabus

  • BI 310 Immunology

    Cellular and humoral mediated immunology mechanisms including: structure of immunoglobulins and cellular mediators, autoimmunity, tissue transplantation, tumor immunology, and the immunological basis of diagnosis and therapeutics. Prerequisite: BI 101 or permission of instructor—BI 303 recommended
    Course Syllabus

  • BI 320 Environmental Science

    Interrelationships of matter, energy, living organisms, ecosystems, and the biosphere with emphasis on ecological principles, environmental problems, and the effect of human activity. 3 credit hours
    Course Syllabus

  • BI 323 Evolution

    Operating principles and processes of organic evolution; includes natural selection, macro and micro evolution, the phylogeny of major life forms, with an emphasis on vertebrates and humans. Prerequisite: BI 101 and BI 102, or permission of instructor
    Course Syllabus

  • BI 335 Ecology

    Interrelationships of organisms with their living and nonliving environment; includes populations, communities, ecosystems, and biomes. Prerequisite: BI 101 or permission of instructor (4 credit hrs lecture; 1 credit hr lab)
    Course Syllabus

  • BI 340 Biology of Women

    The anatomy and physiology of women throughout their life span including issues relating to their health, nutrition, healthcare, and specific disorders and diseases relating to women.
    Course Syllabus

  • BI 390 Problems in Biology

    Provides the opportunity for a student to do in-depth library research in a particular area of biology of interest to the student. Prerequisites: Minimum of 12 credit hrs in Biology (1 to 3 credit hrs)
    Course Syllabus

  • BI 399 Topics in Biology

    An experimental course covering topics not considered elsewhere in the Biology Area of Study. Specific titles of courses offered under this heading will be listed in the course schedule for the sessions in which they are offered. Not offered every year.
    Course Syllabus

  • BI 410 Developmental Biology

    Embryological development including: fertilization, cellular division, early development, differentiation, and precocious growth of multicellular organisms. Prerequisites: BI 101, BI 210, junior or senior standing (3 credit hrs lecture; 1 credit hr lab)
    Course Syllabus

  • BI 480 Senior Thesis in Biology

    A project developed by student and instructor culminating in a written and oral report to the faculty. Project may involve lab and/or field research and/or an extensive investigation of current scientific literature in a specified area of Biology. Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of the instructor
    Course Syllabus

  • BPUE 280 Seminar in Professional Studies

    An analysis of recent books on business, management, and leadership that challenges the wisdom of current practices. The course brings you up to date while challenging assumptions on fundamental issues.
    Course Syllabus

  • BSIT 200 Computer Hardware and Software Management

    This course introduces software, hardware and operating systems concepts. Topics include fundamentals of computer technology; installation and configuration of PCs, laptops and related hardware; and basic networking. Course topics align with the CompTIA A+ Essentials certification.
    Course Syllabus

  • BSIT 220 Network Management and Infrastructure

    This course addresses the skills and knowledge necessary to become an IT Professional in the networking field. Topics include network technologies, installation and configuration, media and topologies, management, and security. Course topics align with the CompTIA Network+ certification.
    Course Syllabus

  • BSIT 310 Computer and Network Security Fundamentals

    This course introduces security concepts, tools, and procedures for preventing, mitigating and responding to security incidents. Network security, compliance and operational security, threats and vulnerabilities, application, data and host security, access control and identity management, and cryptography are explored. Course topics align with the CompTIA Security+ certification.
    Course Syllabus

  • BSIT 320 Computer Server Environments

    This course focuses on installing, configuring, diagnosing, and troubleshooting servers, including server hardware, general storage, upgrades, maintenance, and disaster recovery. Course topics align with the CompTIA Server+ certification.
    Course Syllabus

  • BSIT 340 Cisco Routing Fundamentals

    This course introduces Cisco routing and configuration concepts, including the basics of installation, operation and troubleshooting small enterprise networks. Topics include network security, routing and switching, simple network configuration, wide area network (WAN) technologies, and wireless networking concepts. Course topics align with the Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) certification.
    Course Syllabus

  • BSIT 341 Cisco Network and Routing Infrastructures

    This course introduces Internet working through the study of Cisco routing and switching. Coverage includes installing, configuring, operating, and optimizing networks that use Ethernet, TCP/IP, Wide Area Network protocols, and Cisco network hardware. Course topics align with the Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) certification. Prerequisite: BSIT 340
    Course Syllabus

  • BSIT 350 Microsoft Networking Fundamentals

    This course focuses on the skills needed to administer small to medium-sized networks in Microsoft Windows server environments. Issues dealing with network infrastructures, network hardware, protocols and services, security layers, operating system security, network security, and security software will be explored. Course topics align with the Microsoft Technology Associate (MTA) Networking Fundamentals certification.
    Course Syllabus

  • BSIT 375 Administration of Data Storage Technologies

    This course introduces the knowledge and skills required to configure basic networks to include archive, backup, and restoration technologies. Topics including fundamentals of business continuity, application workload, system integration, and storage/system administration, while performing basic troubleshooting on connectivity issues and referencing documentation. Course topics align with the CompTIA Storgage+ Powered by SNIA certification.

  • BSIT 400 Cloud Computing and Governance

    This course introduces cloud computing from a business and technical perspective, including implementing and governing a cloud environment. Topics include characteristics of cloud services from a business perspective, the business value of cloud computing, technical considerations, cloud types, steps to successful adoption, impact on IT service management, and risks and consequences. Course topics align with the CompTIA Cloud Essentials certification.
    Course Syllabus

  • BSIT 410 Managing Green IT Structures

    This course explores the implementation of environmentally sound techniques within an organization's IT infrastructure. Topics include current IT methodologies; developing, deploying, and calculating ROI for green IT initiatives; power management and IT virtualization techniques; environmentally-sound waste disposal; and standards and regulations. Course topics align with the CompTIA Green IT certification.
    Course Syllabus

  • BSIT 420 Microsoft Operating System Management

    This course provides a foundation for managing and maintaining the most current version of the Microsoft Windows Operating System. Issues dealing with operating system configurations, installing and upgrading client systems, managing files and folders, managing devices, operating system maintenance, server roles, active directory, storage, server performance management, and server maintenance will be addressed. Course topics align with the Microsoft Technology Associate (MTA) Windows Operating System Fundamentals certification.
    Course Syllabus

  • BSIT 440 Microsoft Windows Server Management

    This course provides a foundation for creating and managing accounts and resources, implementing devices and drivers, and monitoring server performance and services in a Windows Server environment. Course topics align with the Microsoft Technology Associate (MTA) Windows Server Administration Fundamentals certification.
    Course Syllabus

  • BSIT 450 Microsoft Security Management

    This course provides a foundation for managing security of accounts and resources, monitoring server performance, and safeguarding data in a Windows Server environment. Topics include network infrastructures, network hardware, protocols and services, security layers, operating system security, network security, and security software. Course topics align with the Microsoft Technology Associate (MTA) Security Fundamentals certification.
    Course Syllabus

  • BSIT 499 Certification Component

    This course provides a monitored structure for study which can be used to apply knowledge and skills acquired throughout the program toward the completion of an approved vendor certification. Students must submit a proposal for certification, including objectives, to the faculty sponsor prior to the start of the semester. A plan for completion of the approved certification and documentation for attainment of the objectives will be developed in conjunction with the faculty sponsor. Prerequisite: The Certification Component should be taken after completing a minimum of 18 credit hours of the required major courses.

  • BSNU 360 Fundamentals of Professional Nursing

    This course serves as the foundation for the transition to professional nursing, introducing concepts useful for advancement into a leadership and/or management role in healthcare. Principles of the professional nurses’ role, effective leadership and followership, and promotion of the profession are highlighted in this course. Prerequisite: Admission to program
    Course Syllabus

  • BSNU 380 Professional Collaborative Strategies for Nurses

    This course is essential for the nurse leader/manager, as a member of the healthcare team, identifying the process for group collaboration for the purpose of decision-making. The focus of the course is aimed at development of effective leadership skills and strategies for collaboration and conflict management. Prerequisite: BSNU 360
    Course Syllabus

  • BSNU 400 Nursing Leadership

    The course will explore concepts and strategies that influence decision making, including negotiation strategies and considerations for the implication of professional values, motivation, education, and cultural competence. Prerequisite: BSNU 380
    Course Syllabus

  • BSNU 410 Nursing Informatics

    This course introduces the nurse’s role in sending and receiving healthcare information. Emphasis includes methods, tools, resources, and technology systems used in healthcare information exchange and decision-making. Prerequisite: BSNU 400
    Course Syllabus

  • BSNU 420 Nursing Research and Evidence Based Practice

    The focus of this course is on consumership of healthcare research and the application to evidence-based nursing practice. The course introduces types of research, data collection, analysis of data, and interpretation of data for implementation into practice. Prerequisite: BSNU 410
    Course Syllabus

  • BSNU 430 Population-Based Health Promotion

    This course will provide the professional nurse with a broadened, population approach to wellness and health promotion as well as disease and injury prevention. The course includes examination of evidence-based strategies for health promotion/disease prevention for populations defined by criteria of healthcare disparity. Prerequisite: BSNU 420
    Course Syllabus

  • BSNU 440 Healthcare Regulation

    This course will examine regulation of healthcare through ethics, law, and policy. Emphasis is placed on the implications for healthcare delivery as well as nursing leadership and management. Prerequisite: BSNU 430
    Course Syllabus

  • BSNU 460 Nursing Management and Quality Healthcare

    The focus of this course is development of an understanding of organizational behavior and the manager’s role in the contribution to the transformation of the organization and quality healthcare delivery. Prerequisite: BSNU 440
    Course Syllabus

  • BSNU 480 Strategic Nursing Management

    This course will provide a realistic view of the day to day management issues that nurse leaders and managers face. Emphases will include nursing employment trends; recruitment and retention; staffing and delegation; finance/budgeting, and strategic planning. Prerequisite: BSNU 460
    Course Syllabus

  • BUSC 309 Business Communications

    This course focuses on the practical application of business communication. Emphasis will be placed on learning the different types of writing required in the modern business environment including an introduction to professional presentations. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the College of Business’ Bachelor of Science in Business accelerated degree program.
    Course Syllabus

  • BUSC 319 Decision Making in a Business Environment

    This course focuses on the knowledge needed to understand and apply processes for making business decisions. Emphasis is placed on the role of capitalism as the underlying assumptions for making economic decisions in the U.S. Emphasis will also be placed on developing critical thinking skills. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the College of Business’ Bachelor of Science in Business accelerated degree program.
    Course Syllabus

  • BUSC 329 Foundations of Fiscal Management

    This course focuses on the practical application of accounting concepts and processes and financial data analysis. The importance of the management of business information systems will also be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on how these basic concepts are used in today’s global business environment. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the College of Business’ Bachelor of Science in Business accelerated degree program.
    Course Syllabus

  • BUSC 410 Business Systems and Information Management

    This course addresses the use of systems and information within the business environment. The process of developing and utilizing information within various systems of an organization will be examined. Case studies and application of theory will be utilized to demonstrate the role of information and systems within business. The course will also focus on issues including the use of social media, record keeping, and data mining for competitive advantages. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the College of Business’ Bachelor of Science in Business accelerated degree program and the successful completion of RCBC 310, RCBC 320, RCBC 330, and RCBC 340
    Course Syllabus

  • BUSC 420 Business Accounting and Finance

    This course is designed to introduce fundamentals of managerial accounting and financial decision making. The course covers accounting and management decision making, cost concepts, long and short-term strategic and operational planning, and control of cost. Accounting and financial decisions and how they relate to ethical behavior and to management’s responsibility to stakeholders will also be covered. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the College of Business’ Bachelor of Science in Business accelerated degree program and the successful completion of RCBC 310, RCBC 320, RCBC 330, and RCBC 340
    Course Syllabus

  • BUSC 426 Business Accounting and Finance

    This course is designed to introduce fundamentals of managerial accounting and financial decision making. The course covers accounting and management decision making, cost concepts, long and short-term strategic and operational planning, and control of cost. Accounting and financial decisions and how they relate to ethical behavior and to management’s responsibility to stakeholders will also be covered. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the College of Business’ Bachelor of Science in Business accelerated degree program.
    Course Syllabus

  • BUSC 433 Business Management and Organizations

    The course focuses on organizational dynamics including motivation, leadership, cultural aspects, ethics and other related topics. The course is designed to encourage and demonstrate the application of the pillars of capitalism in diverse conceptual and theoretical perspectives to organizational management and behavior. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the College of Business’ Bachelor of Science in Business accelerated degree program and the successful completion of RCBC 310, RCBC 320, RCBC 330, and RCBC 340
    Course Syllabus

  • BUSC 436 Business Marketing and Supply Chain

    This course provides an introduction to the functions of marketing and supply chain management. It covers current marketing concepts and practical application for both entrepreneurs and business organizations. The relationships between marketing and supply chain will be addressed to include key decisions within operations management. Additional emphasis will be given to global markets, the internet, social media, and multicultural marketing. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the College of Business’ Bachelor of Science in Business accelerated degree program.
    Course Syllabus

  • BUSC 440 Business Marketing and Supply Chain Management

    This course provides an introduction to the functions of marketing and supply chain management. It covers current marketing concepts and practical application for both entrepreneurs and business organizations. The relationships between marketing and supply chain will be addressed to include key decisions within operations management. Additional emphasis will be given to global markets, the internet, social media, and multicultural marketing. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the College of Business’ Bachelor of Science in Business accelerated degree program and the successful completion of RCBC 310, RCBC 320, RCBC 330, RCBC 340, BUSC 410, BUSC 420, and BUSC 433
    Course Syllabus

  • BUSC 445 Enterprise Systems and Management of Information

    This course addresses the use of systems and information within the enterprise environment. The process of developing and utilizing information within various systems of an enterprise will be examined. The course will focus on issues including the use of social media, record keeping, and data mining to achieve consistent enterprise operations.

  • BUSC 446 Management of Information Systems

    This course addresses the use of systems and information within the business environment. The process of developing and utilizing information within various systems of an organization will be examined. Case studies and application of theory will be utilized to demonstrate the role of information and systems within business. The course will also focus on issues including the use of social media, record keeping, and data mining for competitive advantages. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the College of Business’ Bachelor of Science in Business accelerated degree program.
    Course Syllabus

  • BUSC 455 Project Management in the Enterprise

    This course focuses on the increasing use of projects to accomplish important enterprise goals. A variety of projects, organizational settings, and issues will be investigated. Emphasis will be placed on how project management concepts are used in today’s enterprise environment.

  • BUSC 456 Business Management and Organizational Behavior

    This course examines the process of achieving desired results through the efficient use of human and material resources. An overview of theory and practice of management is presented covering the basic functions: planning, organizing, leading and controlling, and issues related to teams, groups, empowerment, and change. The course will focus on problems related to perception, motivation, leadership, cultural diversity, interpersonal and group dynamics, stress, influence, decision-making, ethics, international management issues, and change. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the College of Business’ Bachelor of Science in Business accelerated degree program.
    Course Syllabus

  • BUSC 465 Enterprise Accounting and Finance

    This course focuses on managerial accounting and financial decision-making through analyzing the economic welfare of an enterprise to make data-driven decisions. Emphasis will be placed on cost concepts, long and short-term strategic and operational planning, and control of cost.

  • BUSC 466 Global Business Management

    This course is an overview of global management theory and practices. Management strategies for operations and marketing in a global economy are examined. Economic theory is also examined as it relates to these strategies. Also included are team work and communication skills. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the College of Business’ Bachelor of Science in Business accelerated degree program.
    Course Syllabus

  • BUSC 475 Enterprise Management and Organizational Dynamics

    The course focuses on organizational dynamics with an emphasis on developing an understanding and managing the issues, problems, and the practical implications of various theories of human behavior within the enterprise.

  • BUSC 476 Business Capstone

    Students present a formal Professional Capstone project covering the material presented throughout the previous courses in both a written and oral format. This course allows students to synthesize their knowledge into a collection of a comprehensive paper and professional presentation. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the College of Business’ Bachelor of Science in Business accelerated degree program.
    Course Syllabus

  • BUSC 485 Supply Chain Management

    This course provides an introduction to the functions of supply chain management and covers the practical application for the enterprise. The relationships of supply chain will be addressed to include key decisions within operations management.

  • BUSC 495 Business Marketing

    This course provides an introduction to the functions of marketing and covers current marketing concepts and the practical application for the enterprise. Additional emphasis will be given to global markets, the Internet, social media, and multicultural marketing.

  • CA 109 Oral Communication Skills

    This course will help the student develop and apply the skills necessary to design and deliver an effective and well organized speech. The course provides instruction in the preparation and delivery of informative and persuasive speeches. The course develops competencies in the areas of critical thinking, organization of thought, creativity, planning and organizing, and public speaking.
    Course Syllabus

  • CA 202 Small Group Interaction

    Development and application of small group communication theories designed to enhance communication skills needed in the workplace and in various social environments. Competencies in the areas of effective communication, adaptability, conveying information, managing conflict, organized thinking, and problem solving are addressed.
    Course Syllabus

  • CA 203 Understanding Mass Media

    This course examines the origins, development, and current role of mass media in shaping and reflecting society. Emphasis is placed on informed, critical consumption of mass media products and processes.
    Course Syllabus

  • CA 204 Interpersonal Communication

    Introduces concepts and basic theories of interpersonal communication. Provides opportunities to identify areas for personal improvement and to increase one’s repertoire of communication behavior choices. Competencies in the areas of listening, perceiving, integrating, and conveying information are addressed.
    Course Syllabus

  • CA 208 Critical Thinking and Communication

    Introduces models and theories to develop and apply critical thinking skills needed for effective communication in work, social, and personal areas of life. Presents terminology, techniques, and communication processes to enhance cognition and improve communication skills. Competencies in the areas of argumentation, reasoning, persuasion, and critical thinking are addressed.
    Course Syllabus

  • CA 228 Writing for Media

    Examines various writing forms in the media. Emphasizes articles of scripts suitable for publication or broadcast. Introduces computer technology. Provides opportunities for active learning. Competencies in the areas of audience analysis, critical thinking, persuasion, and organization of thought are addressed. Prerequisite: EN 101 and CA 109
    Course Syllabus

  • CA 301 Persuasion

    Theory and practice of persuasive speaking designed to enhance speaking skills and sound reasoning in a variety of contexts. Provides instruction on organization of thought and effective argumentation skills. Competencies in the areas of audience analysis, organized thinking, motivation, and persuasiveness are addressed. Prerequisite: CA 109
    Course Syllabus

  • CA 303 Nonverbal Communication

    Theory and application of nonverbal communication theories directed toward improved understanding of self and others in a variety of communication contexts. Presents terminology, concepts, and models of nonverbal communication. Competencies in the areas of effective social interaction, intercultural awareness, conversational adaptability, self-awareness, and relational communication are addressed. Prerequisite: CA 109
    Course Syllabus

  • CA 304 Gender Communication

    Provides a comprehensive view of gender communication as it relates to its prevalence and impact in society. Research of gender communication serves to enhance greater understanding of the oppressive nature of gender communication and its influence on society. Competencies in the areas of perception, adaptability, critical thinking, and innovation are addressed. Prerequisite: CA 109
    Course Syllabus

  • CA 305 Conflict and Communication

    This course introduces concepts and theories pertaining to conflict communication, conflict styles, and problem solving techniques. Develops and applies skills needed to resolve conflict in work, social, and personal areas. Develops competencies in the areas of problem solving, conflict resolution and critical thinking. Prerequisite: CA 109
    Course Syllabus

  • CA 308 Business Communication

    Theory and practice of written and oral communication skills needed in the business and workplace. Presents models, concepts, and case studies relevant to the workplace. Competencies in the areas of writing, oral communication, organization of thought, creativity, and decision making are addressed. Prerequisite: CA 109
    Course Syllabus

  • CA 309 Communication: Putting Theory into Practice

    Provides a wide range of communication theories with a special emphasis on direct application. Introduces models/concepts designed to improve communication skills in a variety of contexts and communication environments. Competencies in the areas of relationship development, listening, socialization, cognitive processing, reducing uncertainty, and dealing with conflict are addressed. Prerequisite: CA 109
    Course Syllabus

  • CA 310 Communication and Popular Culture

    In this course, students use rhetorical theory to analyze popular culture and its effects. Students will become familiar with the work of prominent rhetorical theorists, will successfully apply rhetorical theory concepts to popular culture artifacts, and will develop their own rhetorical skills in thinking, speaking, and writing. Prerequisite: CA109
    Course Syllabus

  • CA 315 Health Communication

    This course examines the theory and practice of health communication. Emphasis is placed on interpersonal relationships, social and cultural issues, and mediated messages concerning health communication. Prerequisite: CA 109
    Course Syllabus

  • CA 317 Psychology of Communication

    Introduces theories and concepts that connect psychology and communication. Presents terminology, research opportunities, and direct application of social cognition skills required to be a competent communicator in an ever-changing world. Competencies in the areas of critical thinking, identifying manipulation and influence, detecting deception, and managing conflict are addressed. Prerequisite: CA 109
    Course Syllabus

  • CA 320 Family Communication

    Introduces concepts and case studies of communication related to the family. Provides wide range of family communication models and theories related to functional families and positive communication. Competencies in the areas of conflict, interpersonal communication, ethics, and leadership are addressed. Prerequisite: CA 109
    Course Syllabus

  • CA 321 Communication and Critical Thinking

    This course builds critical thinking and communication skills through enhanced reading, writing, and oral communication practices. Through the development of stronger comprehension, compositional and multimodal communication skills, students will demonstrate increased abilities in critical thinking and metacognitive strategies.

  • CA 323 Public Relations

    Theory and practice of public relations processes and practices. Review and integration of case studies and direct application of theories through research and assessment. Addresses competencies in the areas of coordinating, managing conflict, planning and organizing, ethics, and public speaking. Prerequisite: CA 109
    Course Syllabus

  • CA 325 Organizational Communication

    Presents an overview of organizational communication. It is a foundational course for those interested in studying organizational communication. It provides a general survey of the topic for those interested in only one course on the topic. The course will be oriented to both theory and practice.
    Course Syllabus

  • CA 326 Introduction to Corporate Communication

    This course is designed to provide a foundation for understanding professional communication and for developing basic corporate communication skills. This course orients the student to essential features of communication and develops competencies in conceptualizing oral and written communication and problem solving. Prerequisite: CA 109
    Course Syllabus

  • CA 358 Communicating with Emotional Intelligence

    Introduces concepts and models dealing with the emotions as they relate to effective communication in a variety of social contexts. Presents terminology, processes, and case studies. Competencies in motivation of self, dealing with difficult others, managing conflict and emotional expression are addressed.
    Course Syllabus

  • CA 400 Managing Internal Communication

    This course introduces the practices and principles of communicating with internal stakeholders—specifically employees. The course emphasizes interactive employee communication programs, strategies and the manager’s role in establishing an environment that encourages dialogue and the flow of information. Prerequisite: CA 109
    Course Syllabus

  • CA 401 Professional Communication

    Provides instruction on strategies, techniques, and models of professional communication. Develops and applies speaking skills at various communication levels and in a variety of contexts. Integrates course material into workplace environments. Addresses competencies in the areas of persuasive speaking, organization of thought, planning and organizing, and ability to conceptualize.
    Course Syllabus

  • CA 404 Interviewing

    Provides instruction in effective interviewing techniques and strategies. Addresses models and concepts relevant to interviewing and introduces opportunities for direct application of course material. Addresses competencies in the areas of managing conflict, decision making, ethics, listening, interpersonal communication, and problem solving. Prerequisite: CA 109
    Course Syllabus

  • CA 426 Building Effective Organizations

    This course focuses on training the competent communicator to train others in the organization. The course also emphasizes developing the skills necessary to design and develop interventions. Competencies include problem solving, coordinating and visioning. Prerequisite: CA 109
    Course Syllabus

  • CA 450 Diversity and Communication

    Introduces theories, models, case studies, and processes relevant to the study of diversity and communication. Provides opportunity for direct application of course material to enhance communication skills with diverse others and in a variety of contexts. Competencies that are addressed include: critical thinking, leadership and influence, ethics, listening, managing conflict, and emotional intelligence. Prerequisite: CA 109
    Course Syllabus

  • CBAS 110 Managing a Windows Server Environment and Infrastructure

    This course introduces students to the basic knowledge and skills that are required to manage accounts and resources, monitor server performance and safeguard data in a Windows Server environment. Where possible, course materials are aligned with the Microsoft certification objectives for Windows Server.
    Course Syllabus

  • CBAS 140 Introduction to A+ Certification

    This course introduces students to knowledge and skills related to software, hardware and operating systems concepts. The course prepares students for the A+ Essentials certification exam from CompTIA.
    Course Syllabus

  • CBAS 150 Oracle Database Concepts

    This course introduces students to knowledge and skills related to the basics of installing and administering of an Oracle 10g database management system. Where possible, course materials are aligned with coursework that prepares students for the Oracle Certified Associate (OCA) certification exam.
    Course Syllabus

  • CBAS 211 Managing an Exchange Server

    This course introduces students to knowledge and skills related to the most current version of Microsoft Exchange Server. Students learn to configure and manage a scalable messaging environment that can be used to create, store, and share information. Where possible, course materials are aligned with the Microsoft certification objectives for Exchange.
    Course Syllabus

  • CBAS 212 Implementing Security on Microsoft Servers

    This course introduces students to knowledge and skills related to the basics of implementing security for wireless, IPSEC and certificate servers. It also discusses the configuration of an Internet Security and Acceleration (ISA) server. Where possible, course materials are aligned with coursework that prepares students for the Microsoft certification exam for Implementing and Administering Security in a Microsoft Windows Network.
    Course Syllabus

  • CBAS 220 Introduction to Server+ Certification

    This course introduces students to knowledge and skills related to installing, configuring, diagnosing, and troubleshooting servers, including server hardware, general storage, upgrades, maintenance, and disaster recovery. The course prepares students for the Server+ certification exam from CompTIA.
    Course Syllabus

  • CBAS 230 Introduction to Security+ Certification

    This course introduces students to knowledge and skills measured by the CompTIA Security+ examination. Students learn foundation-level skill and knowledge in General Security Concepts, Communication Security, Infrastructure Security, Basics of Cryptography, and Operational Security. Course materials are aligned with the CompTIA objectives for the Security+ certification.
    Course Syllabus

  • CBAS 240 SQL Server Installation and Administration

    This course identifies SQL Server 2008 components and management tools, and outlines the requirements for installing SQL Server 2008. It cover the steps required to complete a fresh installation of a SQL Server 2008 instance. Upgrading a SQL Server instance is also explored.
    Course Syllabus

  • CBAS 245 Designing and Maintaining a SQL Server Database Infrastructure

    In order to configure a SQL Server 2008 database to meet business requirements, administrators and developers must fully understand how to design, create, and configure there database objects for data retrieval. With the database Engine at its core, SQL Server 2008 offers integration, reporting, and analysis tools to access and process the data necessary to create business solutions. This course identifies these database objects and demonstrates the steps required to administer them within the SQL Server 2008 Management Studio tool. It also gives an overview of the importance of business intelligence in today's competitive market and introduces the capabilities provided by SQL Server 2008 Integration Services, Reporting Services, and Analysis Services.
    Course Syllabus

  • CBAS 250 Advanced Oracle Database Concepts

    This course allows students to explore advanced topics in database administration, including database security, backup and recovery activities, administering users, and database monitoring and maintenance. This course in conjunction with CBAS 150 prepares students for the Oracle Certified Associate (OCA) certification exam from Oracle. Prerequisite: CBAS 150
    Course Syllabus

  • CBAS 270 Installing, Configuring, and Administering MS Windows Operating Systems

    This course introduces students to knowledge and skills related to maintaining the most current version of the Microsoft Windows Operating System. Where possible, course materials are aligned with coursework that prepares students for the Microsoft certification exam for Installing, Configuring, and Administering MS Windows Operating Systems.
    Course Syllabus

  • CBAS 293 Planning and Maintaining an MS Windows Server Network Infrastructure

    This course introduces students to knowledge and skills related to maintaining the most current version of the Microsoft Windows network infrastructure. Where possible, course materials are aligned with coursework that prepares students for the Microsoft certification exam for Planning and Maintaining an MS Windows Server Network Infrastructure.
    Course Syllabus

  • CBAS 294 Planning, Implementing, and Maintaining an MS Windows Server Active Directory Infrastructure

    This course introduces students to knowledge and skills related to maintaining the most current version of the Microsoft Windows Active Directory infrastructure. Where possible, course materials are aligned with coursework that prepares students for the Microsoft certification exam for Planning, Implementing, and Maintaining an MS Windows Server Active Directory Infrastructure.
    Course Syllabus

  • CH 115 General Chemistry I

    Studies chemical reactions, stoichiometry, thermo chemistry, atomic and molecular structure, bonding, measurements, the periodic Table, solids, liquids, gases, and solutions. Also includes qualitative and quantitative analysis. For students majoring in science or in pre-professional programs or allied health fields. Prerequisite: High School Algebra (3 credit hrs lecture; 1 credit hr lab)
    Course Syllabus

  • CH 116 General Chemistry II

    Continuation of CH 115. Includes the study of acids, bases, chemical equilibrium, thermodynamics, kinetics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, hydrogen and its compounds, nonmetals, metalloids, and metals and their compounds. Prerequisite: CH 115 (3 credit hrs lecture; 1 credit hr lab)
    Course Syllabus

  • CH 210 Organic Chemistry I

    This course includes a study of the structure and functions of the many functional groups of organic chemicals includes: hydrocarbons, hybridization, nomenclature, N and O-containing organic compounds, stereochemistry, infrared, UV and light spectroscopy, NMR, mechanisms of reaction. Prerequisites: CH 115 and CH 116 or instructor permission (3 credit hrs lecture; 1 credit hr lab)
    Course Syllabus

  • CH 211 Organic Chemistry II

    Continuation of CH 210. Includes a study of addition, elimination, and substitution reactions, carbon-skeletal rearrangements, multi-step synthesis, polymers, SN1, SN2, E1, E2 mechanisms, biological molecules, noncovalent interactions between organic molecules, catalysis, and the molecular basis of drug action. (3 credit hrs lecture; 1 credit hr lab)
    Course Syllabus

  • CH 306 Biochemistry

    Fundamentals of modern biochemistry including such topics as molecular biology, the synthesis and metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, the study of energy metabolism, enzymes, genetic coding, and other topics in the field. Prerequisites: CH 210 and 211 or equivalent (4 credit hrs lecture; 1 credit hr lab)
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 101 Computer Concepts and Applications

    This course introduces the concepts of file management and the use of end-user application software. Lab projects include preparation of written documents with a word processing package, note-taking software, design and use of electronic spreadsheets in business problems, the use of a microcomputer Database Management System (DBMS) package, and presentation software.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 212 Communicating in a Digital World

    This course explores the practical application of technology tools that facilitate creating and communicating information in a digital environment. Topics include the creation of basic documents, spreadsheets, presentations, videos and web pages. This course also covers online meetings, social networks, digital research, online collaboration, communication etiquette, privacy, and security.

  • CIS 237 Elementary Web Scripting

    This course instructs students in the process of writing scripts which will be used to support a Web server environment. Web scripts may take advantage of several kinds of supporting applications, so the installation and configuration of those applications is covered during the early stages of the course. Students learn to create Web forms, collect and process information obtained from them, and to retrieve and update information contained in databases. Prerequisite: A working knowledge of HTML
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 240 Introduction to UNIX

    This course is designed to teach the fundamental concepts required for effective use of a UNIX operating system. During this course students learn to log in and out, navigate the file system, manipulate files, redirect and pipe the input and output of commands, hand file permissions, work with external devices, backup and restore of information, script in Bourne-again and C shells, and the configuring of network services. Hands-on demonstration and practical application play a prominent role in the course.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 242 Introduction to Programming Using Java

    This course introduces the concepts of structured programming using Java. The course covers the basics of the Java programming language syntax, to include designing, coding, documenting, and debugging programs. Additional topics covered will be elementary data structures, input/output statements, selection, iteration, methods, and one-dimensional arrays. Students will write programs using all of the before-mentioned topics.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 243 Introduction to Programming Using C#

    This course is designed to introduce the concepts of structured programming. How programs and programming languages work, and the purposes and practices of structured programming are discussed. Designing, coding, documenting, and debugging programs using elementary data structures, input/output statements, selection and iteration, functions, and one-dimensional arrays are covered in detail.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 248 Introduction to Web Design

    This course is open to all academic majors with an assumed lack of knowledge of the field of web design. Students shall learn the basics of creating, posting, and maintaining Internet web pages. Students shall use multimedia software, web authoring software, and scripting techniques to create the web pages. Also, the students shall evaluate web pages and web sites for technological, business, and artistic merit. This is an interdisciplinary class that allows students to combine computer, business, and creative skills.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 280 Web Server Software

    This course provides students with a hands-on introduction to the software which is most often used on web servers. Students will install and configure virtual machine servers, server operating systems, web-server software, extensions to web-server software, and database management systems.

  • CIS 302 Fundamentals of Mobile Application Development

    This course provides an introduction to the concepts associated with mobile technologies. Current mobile technologies are compared and contrasted. Topics include architecture, design, development, and deployment of mobile applications in order to introduce students to the fundamentals of mobile technologies and applications. Prerequisites: GAME 207 or CIS 242 or CIS 243 or instructor permission.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 303 Android Operating System Mobile Application Development

    This course provides an introduction to the Android Software Development Kit (SDK) Application Programming Interface (API) associated with mobile technology libraries for the Android operating system. Mobile applications are developed and tested using an Android emulator. Prerequisites: CIS 302
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 305 Management and Design of Database Systems

    The major focus of the course will be the relational model with a brief discussion of the hierarchical and network models. Database design using E-R Diagrams will be presented. Relational terminology and the theoretical concepts of the model, such as normalization, will be discussed. The Structured Query Language (SQL) will be used to manipulate the model. Students will prepare a small application using a Commercial Relational Database Management Systems.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 306 Advanced UNIX Administration

    This course teaches the principles of UNIX from an administrator standpoint. Hands on demonstration and practical application of UNIX system administration will be a significant feature of the course. Security, networking, application installation, file system configuration, mounting and un-mounting devices, printing, permission, auditing, ethics, and X Terminal administration are covered. Prerequisite: CIS 240
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 308 Intermediate Database and Database Connectivity

    The subject of database management will be approached in its role as the back end of client/server technology. The focus will be relational database theory and design with specific emphasis given to the use of relational database as an enabling technology in the area of Online Transaction Processing and Online Analytical processing. The use of the Structured Query Language (SQL) will be a significant subject. Issues of distributed databases including concurrency also will be covered. Prerequisite: CIS 305 or equivalent
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 310 Information Systems

    This course provides a foundation for the managerial considerations of acquiring and operating information systems. Students are introduced to existing and emerging information systems and their impact on competitive advantage, reengineering business processes, and decision making.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 311 Network Security

    This course provides an introduction to the goals, functional processes, tools, and techniques associated with network security. Discussion includes devices such as firewalls, intrusion detection mechanisms, and Virtual Private Networks (VPNs). Telecommunications and networks security protocols used to prevent, detect, and correct potential vulnerabilities associated with both the outsider and insider threat are also explored.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 313 Cryptography

    This course provides an introduction to the fundamental components of encryption. Topics include the history of cryptography, public key and private key systems, hashing, and digital signatures. Topics also include the development of the Advanced Encryption Standard, the use and functionality of Pretty Good Privacy, and the Secure Socket Layer.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 321 Structured System Analysis and Design

    This project-based course focuses on the use of tools and methodologies applied to structured system analysis and design. Emphasis is placed on the traditional approaches, for example, system flow charting and entity relationship diagrams. Students will complete a variety of analysis design specifications and a project implementation plan for a simulated business system.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 322 Object-Oriented Analysis and Design

    A project-based course which focuses on the use of tools and methodologies applied to object- oriented analysis and design. Emphasis is placed on the development of enterprise object models, class specifications, Use Cases, Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC) cards, and the use of tools specific to the Unified Modeling Language.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 328 Principles of Web Interface Design

    This course presents students with technologies currently in use in web development, with particular emphasis on the benchmarks, conventions, and standards used to measure the strength of web interfaces. The characteristics which help determine good web interfaces include navigability, bandwidth requirements, aesthetics, consideration for visitors with special needs, and compliance with industry standards.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 337 Web Scripting

    This course provides a broad coverage of Web tools needed to create well designed web sites. Students will learn the fundamentals of server-side scripting creating dynamic web pages that interface with a database while emphasizing vendor-neutral Web standards.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 338 Linux 1

    This course provides an in-depth study of basic Linux administrative tools and practices. It is based on the curriculum recommended by the Linux Professional Institute for certification at the LPIC-1 level, and can be used to prepare for certification exams 101 and 102. Topics covered in this course include Linux commands, shell scripts, file systems, networking, security, and troubleshooting.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 339 Linux 2

    This course consists of an advanced study of Linux servers, networking, administrative tools and practices. It is based on the curriculum recommended by the Linux Professional Institute for certification at the LPIC-2 level, and can be used to prepare for certification exams 201 and 202. Topics covered in this course include resource utilization, compiling the kernel, Linux Web, DNS, DHCP, email, file, print, and database servers, enterprise networking, shell scripts, file systems, networking, security, and troubleshooting. Prerequisite: CIS 338, or a current LPIC-1 certification, or two years documented experience as a Linux system administrator.

  • CIS 340A Business Telecommunications

    This course will explore the fundamental technical principles of telecommunications and computer networks and then examine the business challenges of managing communications resources.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 341A Cisco Networking

    This course introduces Internetworking through the study of Cisco routing and switching. Students will learn how to install, configure, operate, and optimize networks that use Ethernet, TCP/IP, Wide Area Network protocols, and Cisco network hardware. This course follows the Cisco curriculum leading to testing for the Cisco Certified Network Associate certification. Prerequisite: CIS 340A or CIS 351
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 348B Implementing and Managing Network Infrastructures

    This course covers Microsoft Windows networking from the perspective of a system or network administrator. The topics covered include network configuration, IP address assignment, name resolution, routing, Internet Protocol Security (IPSec) and certificates, remote access, and managing and monitoring network access of local and wide area networks.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 349B Implementing and Maintaining Active Directory Structures

    In this course students will plan, implement, and troubleshoot a Microsoft Windows Server Active Directory® services infrastructure. Students will work with a Windows Server directory service environment, including forest and domain structure, Domain Name System (DNS), site topology and replication, organizational unit structure and delegation of administration, Group Policy, and user, group, and computer account strategies. Students will learn how to manage computer services structures within an organization and become familiar with human to computer interaction.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 351 Networking Structures and Desktop Operating Systems

    This course provides a foundation networking concepts, describing networking hardware and communication terminology and contrasts the different types of networking structures. This class introduces the concepts of address, network traffic, and administration of local and wide area networks.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 352 Administration of SQL Databases

    This course provides the knowledge and skills required to install configure, administer, and troubleshoot the client/server database management system of Microsoft Structured Query Language (SQL) Server™. This class introduces the concepts of databases, database management systems, and administration of databases in local and wide area networks.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 353 Intermediate C# Programming

    This course builds upon an introductory programming class. Object-oriented design concepts and techniques are explored. Topics covered include classes, objects, function overloading, inheritance, sequential files in object-oriented programs, exception handling, GUI objects and controls, and debugging concepts. An applied, practical problem-solving approach is emphasized. Prerequisite: CIS 242 or CIS 243
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 355 Business System Programming

    This course builds upon an introductory programming class. Students will be immersed in language syntax and the interactive PC environment. Emphasis will be on solving problems by deriving and implementing appropriate algorithms using Object-Oriented concepts. Graduate Students will accomplish a programming project that will apply the concepts covered in the course.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 357 Operating System Administration

    This course provides the knowledge and skills required to administer small to medium-sized networks in server environments. Hands-on demonstration and practical application of administrative tools, utilities, and configurations in server environments will be the most significant feature of the course. Issues dealing with security, troubleshooting, and configuration will be presented, discussed, and applied by the students in the classroom.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 402A Intermediate Java Programming

    This course is designed to teach principles of Object-Oriented (OO) programming using Java. This course will cover the language syntax, OO concepts, and advanced features of the Java programming language. Prerequisite: CIS 242 or CIS 243
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 403 XML Programming

    This course instructs students in the skills associated with creating and utilizing the XML language for the storage and display of information. Prerequisite: CIS 248
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 404 Advanced Networking Using Java

    This course is designed to teach principles of programming for the World Wide Web using Java technologies. The Java Enterprise Edition (JEE) specification governing these principles will be examined in detail. Prerequisite: CIS 402A
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 405 E-Commerce

    This course is designed for both technical and business students. Students will explore the core technologies and business practices that support commerce using the Internet. The course equips the students with the knowledge necessary to understand and evaluate electronic commerce business models and projects.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 406 Information Security

    This course is designed to provide an introduction to information security. Current trends in information security will be explored. Students will be introduced to sources of threats and vulnerabilities as well as methods for optimizing system security. Legal and ethical issues associated with information security will be examined, as well as how those issues are addressed within the context of an organization.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 411 Assessments and Audits

    This course explores the principles of risk assessment, vulnerability analysis, and auditing. Discussion includes the use of these principles to evaluate the effectiveness of information security controls. Topics include threat and asset identification, countermeasures and safeguards, acceptable risks, and vulnerabilities. The auditing concepts of technical, physical, and administrative controls are also introduced along with how these controls are measured for effectiveness.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 412 Organizational Security

    This course explores the concepts of developing and implementing security policy; business continuity planning; disaster recovery; and education, training and awareness. Assigned projects include developing security policies, writing business recovery plans, and participating in a security awareness exercise. The topics of physical security and organizational structure are also considered.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 418 Social Computing

    This course examines leading social computing frameworks and applications in modern society including social network systems, social media and socially oriented web-based applications. Basic communication practices are related to a digital environment that often lacks collocation. Current domestic and international trends are presented along with actual business social computing implementations. Coverage also includes effective social media campaigns, creating a social computing strategy, and techniques to analyze social computing.

  • CIS 421 Enterprise Information Intelligence

    This course provides an introduction to the field of enterprise information intelligence at the tactical, operational, and strategic levels. Topics include the functional areas of enterprise intelligence, the value, regulation and protection of data as an organizational asset, data requirements, research, integrity, analysis and reporting, and other topics relevant to the field of business intelligence.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 422 Introduction to Business Intelligence

    This course provides an introduction to the broad range of skills necessary for successful collection, development, and management of Business Intelligence (BI) at the enterprise level. Topics include: business analytics, organization memory, information integration, insight creation, and presentation capability as well as additional issues germane to the current and future BI environment.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 423 Data Mining

    This course explores fundamental data mining strategies. Topics include recognizing patterns and making predictions from an applications perspective, and methods for visual presentation of complex data sets. Emphasis is placed on identification of patterns, trends and differences from data sets across categories, space and time. Coverage includes hands-on experimentation with data mining and visualization algorithms. Prerequisite: CIS 422

  • CIS 424 Web Analytics

    This course introduces key concepts, techniques and practices on Web analytics. Data analysis methodologies and Web analytics tools are explored with emphasis on strengthening a Web site's marketing presence and productivity, improving the customer experience, and promoting data-driven decision making. Coverage includes hands-on experimentation with Web analytics tools. Prerequisite: CIS 422
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 433 Information Technology Project Management

    This course provides students with an introduction to program management as it relates to Information Technology. Students develop formal project plans based on actual problems provided by industry. Emphasis is placed on the nine knowledge areas specified by the Project Management Institute (PMI) in the publication, A Guide to Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK®Guide). Both discover-based and team-based activities are used to focus on program management as a discipline.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 434 ASP.NET

    This course focuses on developing, debugging, and deploying data-driven server-side Web applications using the Microsoft Visual Studio® .NET environment and the Microsoft .NET platform to create an ASP.NET Web application that delivers dynamic content to a Web site. Prerequisite: CIS 355. Recommend familiarity with HTML.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 436 Ethics for IT Professionals

    This course discusses ethical issues inherent in the field of information technology. Topics covered focus on the balance between the individual and society, including computer privacy and security, computer crime, software piracy, intellectual property, patent and copyright law, and social issues such as free speech and expression, as well as netiquette. The course also discusses moral responsibility for computer professionals.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 451 Information Systems Strategy, Management and Acquisition

    This course focuses on the strategic role of information technology and information systems within an organization. Topics include managing and integrating information system, defining information infrastructure and system to support organizational structure, assessing the impact of information systems and emerging technologies, and creating management procedures and policies to protect business assets. The dynamic, increasingly globalized and technology intensive nature of business environments in today's society is explored from a management perspective.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 456 Service Component

    This course is designed to provide students with a monitored structure which can be used to apply the concepts and technologies acquired throughout their course of study to a real-world problem or situation that will be proposed and developed by each student. This can be accomplished by way of a faculty approved project, research study, certification or internship. The faculty sponsor will evaluate and approve a student’s proposal and objectives prior to any work being done. Each student will develop and prepare a plan for completion of the approved component and will document the attainment of the objectives by way of milestones, oral or written reports, specified deliverables or satisfactory reports on completion of objectives by the manager of an intern. Students may accomplish the Service Component when they have completed 24 credit hours of the required major courses.

  • CIS 468 Accounting for IT Professionals

    This course is designed to provide an introduction to business issues associated with Information Technology. The course includes an introduction to financial and managerial accounting concepts as they apply to IT issues, including budgeting, costing, budgeting control, and performance evaluation.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 480 Advanced Web Server Administration

    This course explores the configuration and management of Apache and IIS web servers. It covers web server installation, configuration, management, networking, active content support, and security.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 485 Internship in Computer Information Systems

    Designed to expand the learning environment to include the actual workplace. Successful performance in an internship program also can lead to follow-on full time employment. Students will spend time on-the-job equivalent to that spent in the classroom. The learning objectives to be met in the internship and the intern’s ability to meet those objectives must be evaluated and approved by a faculty sponsor and the work supervisor of the intern prior to the start of the internship. These objectives will be documented through oral or written reports as required by the faculty sponsor. An internship can be taken at any time after a student has completed 65 credit hours including 18 hours in CIS-related courses.

  • CIS 512 Survey of Information Technology Management

    This course provides an introduction to the broad range of skills necessary for successful management of information systems at the enterprise level. Topics include: accounting, communication, statistics, management principles, configuration management as well as additional issues topical to the current information systems environment.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 515 IT Infrastructure

    This course focuses on the fundamentals of telecommunications including data, voice, image, and video formats. Coverage includes the concepts, models, architectures, protocols, standards, and security for the design, implementation, and management of digital networks. Emphasis is on the IT infrastructure to serve organizational needs in a rapidly changing competitive and technological environment.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 520 Survey of System Development

    This course introduces the concepts for information systems analysis and design with an emphasis on structured development combined with an introduction to object-oriented analysis and design principles.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 525 Business System Programming

    This course builds upon an introductory programming class. Students will be immersed in language syntax and the interactive PC environment. Emphasis will be on solving problems by deriving and implementing appropriate algorithms using object oriented concepts. Students will accomplish a programming project that will apply the concepts covered in the course. Prerequisite: CIS 242 or CIS 243
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 535 Management and Design of Database Systems

    The major focus of this course is the relational model with a brief discussion of the hierarchical and network models. Database design using E-R Diagrams will be presented. Relational terminology and the theoretical concepts of the model, such as normalization, will be discussed. The Structured Query Language (SQL) will be used to manipulate the model. Students will prepare a small application using a Commercial RDBMS.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 537 Introduction to Cyber Ethics

    This course provides a brief overview of the field of ethics, computer privacy and security, computer crime and software piracy, intellectual property and information ownership, computers and gender, computers and social justice, and civil liberties in cyberspace. Additionally, ethical questions concerning professional codes of conduct and issues of moral responsibility for computer professionals are presented.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 540 Business Telecommunications

    This course provides an introduction to the fundamental technical principles of telecommunications and computer networks. The business challenges of managing communications resources are examined.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 599 Topics in Computer Information Systems

    In-depth exploration of special topics not treated or treated only briefly in other courses. Specific titles of courses offered under this heading will be listed in the course schedules for the sessions in which they are offered.

  • CIS 600E E-Commerce Enterprise

    This course explores how electronic commerce technologies are being used by organizations. It discusses issues of identifying opportunities for electronic commerce, strategies for conducting electronic business, and Internet technologies that thrive in the new economy in large and small companies alike. This course aims to integrate various electronic commerce development tools and technologies and develop strategies for their effective use through business organizations. It equips students with hands-on assignments, to evaluate and implement electronic commerce business models and projects.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 602A Intermediate Java Programming

    This course is designed to teach principles of Object-Oriented (OO) programming using Java. This course will cover the language syntax, OO concepts, and advanced features of the Java programming language. Prerequisite: CIS 242 or CIS 243
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 603 XML Programming

    This course provides an in-depth introduction to programming on the World Wide Web using the Extensible Markup Language (XML).
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 604 Advanced Networking Using Java

    This course is designed to teach principles of programming for the World Wide Web using Java technologies. The Java Enterprise Edition (JEE) specification governing these principles will be examined in detail. Prerequisite: CIS 602A
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 605 Advanced Database Management

    The subject of database management will be approached in its role as the back end of client/server technology. The focus will be on using a relational database as an enabling technology in the area of Online Transaction Processing and Online Analytical processing. The use of the PL/SQL as it relates to database administration and development will be studied. Issues of database security will be a secondary emphasis.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 607 Computer Forensics

    This course is designed as an overview of the investigative methods and tools associated with computer forensics. Topics include: processing crime and incident scenes, digital evidence controls, recovery of information, network forensics, data acquisition, and legal and ethical issues associated with investigations.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 608 Information Security Management

    This course addresses the issues relating to successful information security management. Topics include access control systems, network and software security, management practices, risk management, protection mechanisms, business continuity planning, and legal and ethical issues. The course allows for analysis of current security management models.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 610 Information Warfare

    This course is designed as an overview of the fundamental processes associated with waging war in an electronic age. Topics include strategic planning and tactical analysis for target identification, reconnaissance, and tool selection. The intent of this course is to focus on individual, corporate and national forms of warfare.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 611 Cloud Computing

    This course focuses on the architecture and security associated with cloud computing. Emphasis in placed on key drivers which lead to cloud computing adoption and issues associated with cloud computing governance. Additional topics will include infrastructure security, identity and access management, cloud services, data security and storage, and auditing and compliance. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 621 Applied System Development and Design

    This course addresses the complex and evolving issues of effective systems development. Extends concepts introduced to students in CIS 520 regarding all phases of the system development life cycle. Team-based and discovery-based learning methods are stressed. Development projects will reflect actual problems provided by local industry. A formal software project management plan and schedule will be developed for the implementation and integration phases.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 628 Managing Enterprise Data

    This course provides an introduction to the concepts, issues, and techniques involved in the design, implementation, use, and management of enterprise data systems. Logical data models, database administration, data warehousing, data mining, and data analysis are covered from a management perspective. Prerequisite: Recommended - CIS 520
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 629 Managing Emerging Technologies

    This course provides an exploration of emerging information technologies, including how to define them, how they evolve, their role in the technology life cycle, and their potential economic, social, and cultural relationships. Topics covered include disruptive technologies, successes and failures of past emerging technologies, and integrating emerging technologies into a sustaining technology system.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 633 Information Technology Project Management

    This course addresses the complex and unique issues related to effectively managing projects in an Information Technology context. Emphasis is placed on the nine knowledge areas specified by the Project Management Institute (PMI) in A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide). Team-based and discovery-based learning methods are stressed. Development projects reflect actual problems provided by industry. A formal software project management plan detailing the process groups of initiating, planning, executing, controlling, and closing will be developed.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 634 ASP.NET

    This course covers the development of enterprise-class server-based Web applications using Microsoft's ASP.NET application development platform, Model-View-Controller (MVC) pattern, the common language runtime (CLR), the .NET Framework namespace class libraries, and Microsoft Visual Studio® .NET. Prerequisite: Strongly Recommended: CIS 525 or knowledge of C# or VB programming and familiarity with HTML.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 635 Principles of Human Computer Interface Design

    The practice of effective Graphical User Interface (GUI) design will be a foundation of this course. Various GUI operating systems and environments will be explored. Visual front-end design tools will be discussed. The overall focus of this course will be the visual front-end portion of multi-tiered systems.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 636 Database Security

    This course is designed to introduce the concept of database security to include: Architecture, Password Policies, Virtual Private Databases, Auditing, Privileges, and Roles Administration. The course supplements other Information Security Classes and emphasizes those areas unique to database security. Students will be provided the opportunity to administer and secure a database.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 637 Information Resource Management

    In today’s business world, managing information resources is the responsibility of both business and information systems managers. This course provides an in-depth discussion of the management of information technology resources of organizations. Special emphasis is placed on information as a strategic resource and on its role in policy and strategic planning. The course identifies the principles of using information systems (IS) to create competitive advantages, examines alternative ways to match the IS functions to the structure and behavior of the organization, and explores the multi-disciplinary aspects of the field of Information Technology (IT) management. Topics related to pursuing advanced careers and leadership roles in IT and business management are also discussed in this course.

  • CIS 640 Advanced Telecommunications

    This problem solving course addresses design, system engineering, and integration issues associated with the development, deployment and use of systems which incorporate advanced and emerging telecommunication technologies. Typical problem scenarios will address increasing bandwidth needs, fiber optic technologies, new communications transfer modes, and mobile communications. Whenever possible, design problems will reflect real world problem situations provided by local industry. Prerequisite: CIS 540
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 644 Managing Project Risks

    This course is designed to teach the importance of risk management in projects and provide information about the tools needed to effectively assess and monitor risks throughout the project lifecycle. Emphasis is placed on managing risks associated with project changes and risks associated with information technology projects. Topics covered include recurring issues that lead to failure in IT projects, methods for addressing recurring issues, and assessing risk impact. Prerequisite: CIS 433 or CIS 633 or acceptance into the Master of Project Management (MPM) degree program.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 647 Network Systems

    This course explores network operating systems and network technologies using the latest products by Microsoft, Sun, Linux Project, and others.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 650 Accounting for IT Professionals

    This course is designed to provide an introduction to business issues associated with Information Technology. The course includes an introduction to financial and managerial accounting concepts as they apply to IT issues, including budgeting, costing, control, and performance evaluation.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 653 Enterprise Resource Planning

    This course explores the scope of Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) from a project management perspective. Fundamental issues of ERP implementation, operation, and management will be addressed. The course also identifies competitive advantages of using ERP systems.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 663 Project Communications Management and Leadership

    This course explores communication and leadership techniques in order to equip project managers with the skills they need to deal effectively with issues relating to resources, stakeholders, global teams, and changing technology. Topics covered will include learning how to manage conflict, creating a positive team environment, running effective meetings, and managing successful projects. Prerequisite: CIS 433 or CIS 633 or acceptance into the Master of Project Management (MPM) degree program.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 664 Project Management in Global and Virtual Workplaces

    This course provides a comprehensive overview of relevant topics in the area of global and virtual workplaces, challenges and issues in global project management, methods and tools for effective global project management and managing effective virtual teams. Students will engage in a virtual group project in order to experience key aspects of project management in a way that simulates real project management in a global organization. Prerequisite: CIS 633 or acceptance into the Master of Project Management (MPM) degree program.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 665 Defining and Managing Requirements and Project Success

    This course is designed to explain the process of gathering requirements with emphasis on the successful management of requirements and its relationship to project success. Topics covered include requirements gathering techniques, identifying success criteria, and common reasons for project failure. Prerequisite: CIS 433 or CIS 633 or acceptance into the Master of Project Management (MPM) degree program.
    Course Syllabus

  • CIS 699 Topics in Master of Science in Computer Information Systems

    In-depth exploration of special topics not treated or treated only briefly in other courses. Specific titles of courses offered under this heading will be listed in the course schedules for the sessions in which they are offered.

  • CIS 699A Independent Student in Master of Science in Computer Information Systems

    This provides an opportunity for students to customize their CIS experience by specifically studying other important topics
    Course Syllabus

  • CJUS 305 Theory and Practice of Criminal Justice

    This course will provide a foundation and overview of the diverse criminal justice system. The focus of the course will be on the different components of the criminal justice system and concepts and theories in criminal justice.

  • CJUS 315 The American Criminal and Civil Legal Systems

    This course will provide an examination of the Constitutional underpinnings of criminal and civil law as it applies to the criminal justice system. Special focus will be devoted to an overview of the American court system, specific elements of crime, the operation of civil jurisprudence, and a review of the policies and procedures that influence law in America.

  • CJUS 325 Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Criminal Justice

    This course will address ethical issues in criminal justice at both the theoretical and applied levels. Special emphasis will be given to an examination of the relationship between ethical principles, moral and normative judgments.

  • CJUS 335 Crime in America

    This course will provide a critical analysis of the nature and extent of crime in society. Special emphasis will be placed on offense types and crime trends, social and policy factors affecting crime, and the impact of crime on the operation of the criminal justice system.
    Course Syllabus

  • CJUS 345 Criminal Behavior and Victimology

    This course will focus on the underlying sociological, biological, and psychological explanations for criminal behavior and provide an overview of victimization patterns, causal factors and the consequences of victimization. Particular attention will be paid to an examination of deviant and criminal behavior characteristics, the treatment of victims by the criminal justice system and the relationship between offenders and victims.
    Course Syllabus

  • CJUS 405 Criminal Justice Organizations and Strategic Management

    This course will focus on the contemporary theories of operations management in criminal justice with an emphasis on strategic planning. Specific management concepts including resource management and interagency communication and collaboration will be explored.
    Course Syllabus

  • CJUS 415 Criminal Procedure and Public Policy

    This course will examine the impact of U.S. Supreme Court decisions on the policies and practices of criminal justice agencies. Rules of evidence, search and seizure, custodial rights, and the associated procedural laws will be emphasized.

  • CJUS 425 Justice and Contemporary Social Issues

    This course will focus on problems of social justice, the meaning of justice in a diverse society, and issues of social inequality. An emphasis will be placed on exploring the notion of social ills as precursors to criminal behavior and the possible prophylactic measures to alter those behaviors.

  • CJUS 435 Criminal Justice Problem Analysis

    The course will focus on a comprehensive analysis of the criminal justice system through the integration of case study, research, and critical thinking. Specific emphasis will be given to criminological theory, data analysis and integrity, understanding crime problems, urban issues, strategic planning and relevant literature review.

  • CU 100 An International Student’s Introduction to American Culture

    This course is a study of American culture for International students. It will examine some of the various aspects, beliefs, actions, and values of Americans.
    Course Syllabus

  • CU 101 Introduction to International Studies

    This introductory course provides an overview of international studies. This includes a combination of the religious, political, and cultural elements of countries, as well as the contributions of each to the global village.
    Course Syllabus

  • CU 110 European Union Culture

    This course focuses on the need to prepare students for an increasingly multicultural society; provides students with practical cultural and linguistic experience to meet general education requirements.
    Course Syllabus

  • CU 120 Latin American Culture

    An introduction to Latin American culture. Factors that cause cultural unity and those that cause cultural diversity are discussed.
    Course Syllabus

  • CU 301 Global Cultures and Contemporary Issues

    This course discusses the cultural metaphor for understanding and comparing cultures around the globe. The metaphor represents the underlying values expressive of the culture itself.
    Course Syllabus

  • CU 309 Cultures in Conflict

    This course investigates cultural causes and effects for strategically important conflicts with an emphasis on mutual understanding and conflict resolution. Participants gain an appreciation for the complexity of cultural disputes which have deep, varied, and often conflicting roots.
    Course Syllabus

  • CYBR 105 Evils of the Internet Exposed

    This course explores technologies and techniques for security information and computer systems. Topics include security PCs and mobile devices, privacy on the Internet, online ethics, and basic protection methodologies. Coverage also includes computer, network, and the Internet fundamentals. The course provides hands-on experience using various systems and tools to reinforce security concepts and theories.

  • CYBR 250 Introduction to Cyber Threats, Technologies and Security

    This course introduces information technologies and examines methods for protecting them against persistent and constantly evolving threats. Existing and emerging information technologies are discussed including operating environments, computer networking, and data management. Basic methods for managing information systems and technologies are presented from a standpoint of providing sufficient security protections.
    Course Syllabus

  • CYBR 320 Operational Security

    This course focuses on the skills required to operate a security program within an organization. Coverage includes the practical application of security practices in an operational environment. Topics include security structure, leading security projects, policy management, human factors of security, and physical security methods.
    Course Syllabus

  • CYBR 340 Operating Systems and Mobile Device Security

    This course focuses on the skills required to secure base operating systems on server, desktop, virtual, and mobile platforms. Coverage includes the practical application of security tools, utilities, and configurations for protecting computer operating systems at both the user and corporate level. Discussion also includes protecting stand-alone and virtualized servers, cloud computing security, and the protection of mobile platforms such as smart phones, tablets and handheld computers.
    Course Syllabus

  • CYBR 350 Web, Commerce and Application Security

    This course explores securing core technologies that support Internet applications and commerce. Processes for creating and administering Internet web sites to ensure proper protections are introduced. The course also addresses securing applications on Internet websites and mobile platforms, and introduces basic methods for secure development.
    Course Syllabus

  • CYBR 410 Data/Database Security

    This course focuses on the protection of data at rest. Coverage includes the identification, ownership, and protection of data – whether residing in files, folders, or databases. This course also introduces the concept of database security to include: Architecture, Password Policies, Auditing, Privileges, and Roles Administration. Emphasis is placed on areas unique to data and database security.
    Course Syllabus

  • CYBR 420 Cyber Investigations and Forensics

    This course examines basic methods of investigation, information acquisition, and management of Internet and computer forensic cases. Topics include record-searching, note taking and report writing, and using scientific methodology in Cyber investigations. Coverage also includes basic tools and techniques for forensic analysis of computers, networks systems, and mobile devices.
    Course Syllabus

  • CYBR 433 Cybercrime and Business

    This course focuses on security risk management through the use of real-world security problems, issues, and situations found in businesses today. Particular attention is directed to identifying business risks in cyber systems and managing business policies and practices in the areas of Finance and Accounting in order to comply with cybersecurity laws, regulations, and standards. This course is suitable for students majoring in Cybersecurity, Information Systems or Business, or anyone interested in managing security risks in an organization.
    Course Syllabus

  • CYBR 436 Security for Healthcare

    This course explores the management of security and privacy in the healthcare industry. Coverage includes an extensive study of HIPAA and other applicable laws, and methods for compliance with those laws. Discussion also includes the security of health information systems. This course is suitable for students majoring in Cybersecurity, Information Systems or Healthcare, or anyone interested in learning more about security and privacy in the healthcare industry.
    Course Syllabus

  • CYBR 450 Advanced Cybersecurity Concepts

    This course provides a monitored structure for application of the skills and knowledge acquired throughout the Cybersecurity program. Emphasis is placed on the use of real-world security problems, issues, and situations. Course assignments will require the use of protection, detection, deterrence, and response techniques in addressing threats, vulnerabilities, and risks found in businesses today.
    Course Syllabus

  • CYBR 510 Physical, Operations, and Personnel Security

    This course presents an examination of effective security methodologies based on comprehensive assessment of threats and implementation of a layered system of physical and electronic protection. Threat identification, countermeasures, and prevention are explored.
    Course Syllabus

  • CYBR 515 Security Architecture and Design

    This course provides an introduction to the fundamental components of security architecture. Topics include computer organization; hardware, software and firmware components; open and distributed systems; and protection mechanisms. Discussion also includes certification and accreditation; formal security models; and evaluation criteria. Assigned projects include designing a model secure system.
    Course Syllabus

  • CYBR 520 Human Aspects of Cybersecurity

    This course provides an exploration of the human aspects of Cybersecurity. Topics include human behavior and interaction; motivation and influence; and social engineering. Emphasis on the human element of cyber incidents in relation to protecting information and technology assets.
    Course Syllabus

  • CYBR 525 Ethical Hacking and Response

    This course provides a technical study of offensive and defensive techniques for protecting cyber assets. Topics include security testing, risk mitigation techniques, and threat response. Discussion also includes penetration testing theory, techniques, and tools; network, systems, and application vulnerability scanning; risk analysis and response; and intrusion detection and response. Emphasis is placed on identification of system vulnerabilities and threats and techniques for preventing attacks.
    Course Syllabus

  • CYBR 545 White Collar Crime

    This course explores common techniques, tools, and technologies for committing white-collar cyber crimes. Topics include fraud prevention, anti-money laundering, investigative methodologies, and protecting privacy. Case students will demonstrate real-world scenarios of white collar crimes, how to prevent or deter them, detection methods, and response techniques.
    Course Syllabus

  • CYBR 610 Risk Management Studies

    This course provides an exploration of how organizations manage risks to information technology assets. Discussion includes the application of methodologies and models for managing such risks. Topics also include recognition of security threats and vulnerabilities and the analysis of associated risks. A systematic approach for acquiring and analyzing information to support decision-making in the protection of assets and the allocation of security resources is presented.
    Course Syllabus

  • CYBR 613 Control System Security

    This course explores risks associated with industrial control systems within and across critical infrastructure and key resource sectors. Topics include a comparative analysis of IT and control system architecture, security vulnerabilities, and mitigation strategies unique to the control system domain. This includes activities to reduce the likelihood of success and severity of impact of a cyber attack against critical infrastructure control systems through risk-mitigation activities.
    Course Syllabus

  • CYBR 615 Cybersecurity Governance and Compliance

    This course explores the concepts of governance and how it applies to information systems. Discussion includes the importance of compliance with laws, regulations, policies, and procedures as a means of minimizing risk through mandated security and control measures. Through this course, students also gain an understanding of Information Technology (IT) Auditing processes and principles.
    Course Syllabus

  • CYBR 625 Business Continuity Planning and Recovery

    This course provides the student with an opportunity to identify the processes associated with business continuity planning and disaster recovery. Business continuity topics such as project scope and planning, assessing risk, developing policy and procedures, conducting business impact analyses, recovery strategies, recovery plan development, and implementation are explored. Disaster recovery will be discussed in terms of recovery plan development, implementation, and restoration.
    Course Syllabus

  • CYBR 650 Current Trends in Cybersecurity

    This course presents an in-depth study of current trends in Cybersecurity threats. Discussion includes the identification and management of threats and vulnerabilities within an effective enterprise security program. Prior Cybersecurity education is synthesized through projects and assignments.
    Course Syllabus

  • EC 201 Macroeconomics

    This course is a study of the behavior of the macroeconomy, including the causes and consequences of inflation, unemployment, and the business cycle. Monetary, fiscal, and “supply side” policies for dealing with macroeconomic problems are examined. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or permission of the instructor.
    Course Syllabus

  • EC 202 Microeconomics

    This course is an investigation of the economic behavior of consumers, businesses and government. Emphasis is placed on price and output determination under various market structures and on the entrepreneurial competitive process. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and an understanding of basic math or permission of the instructor.
    Course Syllabus

  • EC 301 Money and Banking

    This course is a study of the theory and history of money and banking. Emphasis is placed on analyzing the Federal Reserve System and the U.S. Treasury and their role in money creation, inflation, business cycles, and international finance. Prerequisites: EC 201 or EC 202
    Course Syllabus

  • EC 332 Comparative Economic Systems

    Analysis of systems for organizing economic activity. Socialist methods of economic management are compared with the operation of the free-market economy and of government intervention into market relationships. Marxian thought also is analyzed in-depth. Not offered every year.
    Course Syllabus

  • EC 333 History of Economic Thought

    This course surveys the development of modern-day economic ideas and doctrines beginning with Adam Smith and his famous work, An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations. The ideas and traditions covered include the British Classical School founded by Smith, the Glut theorists of Thomas Malthus, Karl Marx and his communist ideology, John Maynard Keynes and the rise of macroeconomic demand management, Milton Friedman and Monetarist economics, the Supply Side economics of incentives, and Austrian economics of Mises, Hayek, Hazlitt, Rothbard and Sennholz. Prerequisites: EC 201 or EC 202, or permission of the instructor
    Course Syllabus

  • EC 334 Economics from a Biblical Perspective

    This course examines the literature and debate over the legitimacy of Biblical Economics, the methodology and premises that form its paradigm, and numerous Biblical passages that produce a unified body of thought consisting of interdependent economics and moral principles. These principles will be applied to contemporary economic issues to reveal a distinct set of conclusions for public policy that is uniquely Judeo-Christian. Prerequisites: EC 201 or EC 202, or permission of the instructor
    Course Syllabus

  • EC 399 Topics in Economics

    In-depth exploration of particular economic subjects on issues not treated or treated only briefly in other courses. Specific titles offered under this heading will be listed in the course schedule for the session in which they are offered.
    Course Syllabus

  • ECPM 300 Quality in Early Childhood Programs

    This course provides you with an overview of effective early childhood programs and practices. This course will provide a fundamental standard of early childhood education programs based on the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) standards. The role that leadership plays in high-quality educational settings will also be studied.
    Course Syllabus

  • ECPM 310 Essentials of Management

    This is an introductory course designed as an overview of the theory and practice of management. The course covers the process of achieving desired results through efficient utilization of human and material resources. The concept of management is presented as a discipline as well as a process, covering the basic functions of management: planning, organizing, delegating, leading and controlling, as well as the developing issues of teams, empowerment, and change management.
    Course Syllabus

  • ECPM 320 Principles of Leadership

    This course introduces leadership by focusing on definitions of leadership, fundamental leadership theory, roles of leaders in various contexts, and an overview of foundational skills required for successful leadership.
    Course Syllabus

  • ECPM 330 Human Resource Management

    This course is an introduction to human resource management and exposes you to issues affecting the management of human resources such as basic legal concepts governing human resource management and fundamental practices such as job analysis, writing a job description, and defining job specifications. In addition, the course covers diversity management, training and development, testing, selection, compensation, and benefits.
    Course Syllabus

  • ECPM 400 Finance Management

    This course exposes you to funds management. You will learn how to compute financial ratios and conduct a financial analysis of a company. The financial analysis will include a company analysis of balance sheets, financial statements, and annual reports.

  • ECPM 410 Fund Raising and Revenue Generation

    This course provides you with the knowledge and skills necessary to develop proposals that are based upon clearly defined needs analysis and project goals. You will also examine budget development, financial accountability, and relations with funding sources.
    Course Syllabus

  • ECPM 420 Legal and Ethical Considerations

    This course will help you develop a foundation in ethical principles. You will be challenged to assess your own principles by evaluating the human, ethical, and legal considerations of various human services scenarios in this course. Emphasis is on ethical approaches to problem solving, communication, managing people, and privacy and accuracy of information.

  • ECPM 430 Community and Family Advocacy

    This course exposes you to the best practices of developing effective partnerships with families. This course focuses on the significance of family diversity and the needs in early care and education. Advocacy though professional development which supports young children and their families will be highlighted.

  • ECPM 440 Capstone Portfolio

    You are asked to demonstrate competency from diverse knowledge of early childhood professional settings and roles. You will conduct in-depth research of a topic for Early Childhood Program Management field as well as prepare material designed to aid you in your career.

  • EMGT 300 Introduction to Emergency Management

    This course examines the principles, systems and components involved in Emergency Management by providing a comprehensive overview of the subject. The cycle of Mitigation, Preparedness, Response and Recovery will also be explored.
    Course Syllabus

  • EMGT 310 Natural Disasters

    This course examines atmospheric and earth hazards that rapidly develop without significant warning and ways to mitigate damage caused by these incidents. Floods, wildfires, hurricanes, tornadoes, blizzards and earthquakes are examples of incidents that will be covered.
    Course Syllabus

  • EMGT 320 Terrorism

    This course examines the history, causes, methods and tools of terrorism, which will enable students to critically assess terrorism and terrorist incidents. The course will also cover emerging terrorist threats and counter-terrorism techniques.
    Course Syllabus

  • EMGT 330 The National Incident Management System

    This course examines the concepts of the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and the Incident Management System (ICS), and how these concepts can be implemented. Multiagency Coordination Systems and the National Response Framework will also be covered.
    Course Syllabus

  • EMGT 340 Emergency Communications

    This course examines the key role of communications during a disaster. Students will learn how an emergency manager will work with the media for clear communications with both the private and public sectors.
    Course Syllabus

  • EMGT 400 Emergency Planning

    This course examines the various methods, procedures and strategies of emergency planning. This includes methodology concepts with the use of maps and analytical techniques as well as specialized planning.
    Course Syllabus

  • EMGT 410 Exercise Design

    This course examines the design and direction of Discussion Based exercises (e.g., Workshops, Table Top Exercises) and Operation Based exercises (e.g., Drills, Full Scale Exercise). The utilization of the Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program (HSEEP) will also be covered.
    Course Syllabus

  • EMGT 420 Legal Issues in Emergency Management

    This course examines the law regarding emergency management incidents. The course will also examine constitutional, public health and liability issues.
    Course Syllabus

  • EMGT 430 Capstone Project

    This course will allow students to demonstrate the culmination of skills and knowledge which have been learned throughout the program. Students will plan, develop, implement, and assess a situational scenario for the final project.
    Course Syllabus

  • EN 100 Introduction to English

    This course includes an intensive review of the fundamentals of English composition and focuses on the writing of paragraphs and short essays. This preparatory course is designed for those students whose skills in English usage and writing require strengthening.
    Course Syllabus

  • EN 101 Composition I

    This course offers instruction in the principles of written communication and practice in writing, with emphasis on paragraph construction and the essay form.
    Course Syllabus

  • EN 102 Composition II

    This course offers instruction in three basic modes of composition: summary, critique, and synthesis. It also examines the methodology of research and applies summary, critique, and synthesis in the construction of a research-based essay. Prerequisites: EN 101
    Course Syllabus

  • EN 110 Introduction to Literature

    Study of the fundamentals of literature and literary critical approaches, including discussions of the short story, poetry, and drama, and the essay.
    Course Syllabus

  • EN 203 The Short Story

    History and craft of the short story, with emphasis on both classic and modern stories from around the world.
    Course Syllabus

  • EN 220 Introduction to Film

    History and craft of film through examination of works of major filmmakers, including Griffith, Einstein, Welles, Hitchcock, Bergman, Truffaut, Fellini, Spielberg, Scorsese, Tarrentino, and Campion.
    Course Syllabus

  • EN 235 American Literature I

    Study of the development of American literary thought, from Native American and Puritan literature through Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Emerson, Whitman, and Thoreau.
    Course Syllabus

  • EN 236 American Literature II

    Study of American literature from the Civil War to the present, including such major writers as Dickenson, Twain, Crane, Chopin, Cather, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, Ellison, Bellow, and Momaday.
    Course Syllabus

  • EN 260 Comedy on Stage and Screen

    The purpose of this course is to reveal the serious art that lies behind every successful comedy. The course analyzes the genre of comedy in its most hilarious and original manifestations in the theater, in movies, and on television. Classic and contemporary works are examined.
    Course Syllabus

  • EN 321 Business Communication: Professional Writing, Speaking, and Research

    This course offers students practical application of the best principles of workplace communication, including the many different types of writing required in the modern business environment, professional presentations, and research. Prerequisites: EN 101 and EN 102
    Course Syllabus

  • EN 340 Stephen King

    This course examines the novels of Stephen King as part of the Gothic and horror traditions in literature.
    Course Syllabus

  • EN 341 The History of Horror

    This course offers a chronological historical survey of horror fiction, examining its Gothic precursors and its origin in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and the stories of Edgar Allan Poe. The course examines major works and major types of horror fiction, such as the mad scientist story, the vampire story, the ghost story, and the supernatural horror story.
    Course Syllabus

  • EN 342 The Horror Film

    This course examines horror film as a major type of popular cinema, with its roots in the German expressionist and psychological realist traditions of cinematic art.
    Course Syllabus

  • ES 200 Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship

    Designed to cover all of the major steps that must be mastered for successful startup of a new business venture. The course emphasizes the development of an entrepreneurial perspective to assess, evaluate and act on market opportunities, and the creation of a business plan.
    Course Syllabus

  • FBUS 335 Enterprise Economic Management

    This course focuses on the analysis and measures for managing the economic health of the enterprise. Focus will be placed on utilizing business information systems in a global context.

  • FBUS 345 Resource and Risk Management

    This course focuses on the allocation of enterprise resources when and where they are needed. Emphasis will be placed on how to integrate all facets of the enterprise for greater efficiency and productivity.

  • FBUS 445 Enterprise Systems and Management of Information

    This course addresses the use of systems and information within the enterprise environment. The process of developing and utilizing information within various systems of an enterprise will be examined. The course will focus on issues including the use of social media, record keeping, and data mining to achieve consistent enterprise operations.

  • FBUS 465 Enterprise Accounting and Finance

    This course focuses on managerial accounting and financial decision-making through analyzing the economic welfare of an enterprise to make data-driven decisions. Emphasis will be placed on cost concepts, long and short-term strategic and operational planning, and control of cost.

  • FBUS 485 Supply Chain Management

    This course provides an introduction to the functions of supply chain management and covers the practical application for the enterprise. The relationships of supply chain will be addressed to include key decisions within operations management.

  • FFHU 321 Communication and Critical Thinking

    This course builds critical thinking and communication skills through enhanced reading, writing, and oral communication practices. Through the development of stronger comprehension, compositional and multimodal communication skills, students will demonstrate increased abilities in critical thinking and metacognitive strategies.

  • FFPS 311 Applied Problem Solving

    This course emphasizes problem solving and reasoning skills. The concepts and applications will reinforce and enhance a student’s abilities to effectively make judgments, inferences, analyses, forecasts, and assessments. A variety of essential problem solving techniques will be utilized and applied to the problem solving processes.

  • FFPS 418 Social Computing

    This course examines leading social computing frameworks and applications in modern society including social network systems, social media and socially oriented web-based applications. Basic communication practices are related to a digital environment that often lacks collocation. Current domestic and international trends are presented along with actual business social computing implementations. Coverage also includes effective social media campaigns, creating a social computing strategy, and techniques to analyze social computing.

  • FFSS 414 Enterprise Information Intelligence

    This course provides an integrative foundation in the field of enterprise information intelligence at the tactical, operational, and strategic levels. Topics such as the functional areas of enterprise intelligence, developing skills applicable to real-world issues and solutions, business process analysis and design will be covered, along with other topics relevant to the field of information intelligence.

  • FFSS 421 Transformative Global Interdependence

    This course analyzes from a global perspective the causes, nature, and effects of globalization and how the world is becoming more interconnected and interdependent across all levels: international, national, local, and personal. Topics include compelling contemporary issues with a focus on the economic, political, social and cultural impacts. The course also includes the application of ethical principles in guiding solutions with the challenges that face our society and world and an emphasis on processing and producing primary source and original scholarship material.

  • FLX 100 Flexxive Orientation

    This course provides students the opportunity to explore the Flexxive? course structure and format. Students will gain a better understanding and become acclimated to the Flexxive? learning environment, course navigation, and student and instructional team expectations. This foundation will help students focus on the course content, allowing them to be more productive and successful in their academic endeavors.

  • FMFG 445 Manufacturing Systems and Management of Information

    This course addresses the use of systems and information within the manufacturing environment. The process of developing and utilizing information within various systems will be examined. The course will focus on issues including the use of social media, record keeping, and data mining to achieve consistent manufacturing operations.

  • FMFG 455 Project Management in the Manufacturing Enterprise

    This course focuses on the increasing use of projects to accomplish important manufacturing enterprise goals. A variety of projects, organizational settings, and issues will be investigated. Emphasis will be placed on how project management concepts are used in today’s manufacturing environment.

  • FMFG 465 Manufacturing: Special Topics

    This course focuses on a specific sector of manufacturing based on the student’s interest or current employment area. Students will examine the vital aspects of manufacturing associated with their industry, and learn to discover and apply best practices in their sector.

  • FMFG 475 Manufacturing Management and Organizational Dynamics

    The course focuses on organizational dynamics with an emphasis on developing an understanding and managing the issues, problems, and the practical implications of various theories of human behavior within the manufacturing enterprise.

  • FMFG 485 Supply Chain Management

    This course provides an introduction to the functions of supply chain management and covers the practical application for the manufacturing enterprise. The relationships of supply chain will be addressed to include key decisions within operations management.

  • FMFG 495 Business Marketing

    This course provides an introduction to the functions of marketing and covers current marketing concepts and the practical application for the manufacturing enterprise. Additional emphasis will be given to global markets, the Internet, social media, and multicultural marketing.

  • FMGT 305 Communicating in the Enterprise

    This course focuses on the practical application of communication within the enterprise. Emphasis will be placed on learning how to write, speak, and act in the enterprise, including an introduction to professional presentations.

  • FMGT 315 Solving Problems in the Enterprise

    This course focuses on the application of concepts to solve enterprise problems. Emphasis is placed on identifying and analyzing weaknesses and threats, and investigating potential responses and solutions.

  • FMGT 325 Formulating Data-Driven Decisions

    This course focuses on the skills needed to produce and understand how data is used in the enterprise. Emphasis is placed on demonstrating a systematic and methodical approach to decision-making.

  • FMGT 355 Managing the Global Enterprise

    This course focuses on the inherent issues of the modern global enterprise. Economic and operational influences will be examined in relation to overall strategic management in the enterprise.

  • FMGT 455 Project Management in the Enterprise

    This course focuses on the increasing use of projects to accomplish important enterprise goals. A variety of projects, organizational settings, and issues will be investigated. Emphasis will be placed on how project management concepts are used in today’s enterprise environment.

  • FMGT 475 Enterprise Management and Organizational Dynamics

    The course focuses on organizational dynamics with an emphasis on developing an understanding and managing the issues, problems, and the practical implications of various theories of human behavior within the enterprise.

  • FMGT 495 Business Marketing

    This course provides an introduction to the functions of marketing and covers current marketing concepts and the practical application for the enterprise. Additional emphasis will be given to global markets, the Internet, social media, and multicultural marketing.

  • GAME 101 Introduction to Game Design

    This course explores the practice and form of Games Design. Topics include introduction to interaction design, history of game theory, introduction to methodologies of rule-based systems, collaborative production work-flows, meaningful play and introduction to interactive narrative design. No prerequisites.
    Course Syllabus

  • GAME 102 Introduction to Game Development

    This course further explores the development and practice of Game Design and how it applies to interactive art. Topics include introduction to interactive narrative design, the basics of video game programming and computer-mediated interactive systems, collision management, version control, interface design and exporting. Prerequisite: GAME 101
    Course Syllabus

  • GAME 103 Introduction to Digital 2D Design

    This course provides beginning through intermediate concepts and practice in digital 2D design. Topics covered include fundamentals of digital color theory, digital imaging, selection tools, layering, digital painting tools, and photo retouching. Students will incorporate basic design principles in their texture designs and compositions. No prerequisites.
    Course Syllabus

  • GAME 104 Introduction to Digital 3D Design

    This course provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts of 3-dimensional design for digital contexts. Topics covered include fundamentals of volume, space, proportion, weight, mass, digital modeling tools, extrusion, meshes, polygon modeling and curves. Prerequisite: GAME 102 or 103
    Course Syllabus

  • GAME 205 Beginning Portfolio Development

    This course focuses on designing an industry quality portfolio and cultivating and maintaining an industry network. The portfolio started in this course will be built upon in subsequent courses and will be used in internship applications. Prerequisites: GAME 102, 104
    Course Syllabus

  • GAME 206 Intermediate Digital Design

    This course further examines the principles of 2D and 3D visual design for games. It places an emphasis on using digital tools to produce concept art and pre- and post-production materials for portfolios and personal projects. Students will explore the processes of asset, interface and environment design. Prerequisites: GAME 102, 104
    Course Syllabus

  • GAME 207 Introduction to Game Programming

    This course explores structured programming in game development. Course topics include languages, programming techniques, algorithms, game testing, game logic, real-time 3D rendering, asset control, and pipeline management. Students will program and complete several games. Prerequisite: GAME 205
    Course Syllabus

  • GAME 208 Level Design

    This course explores the layout and content design of analog and digital interactive spaces. Students will complete a combination of exercises, individual and collaborative projects that address the creation of interactive spaces as emotional feedback systems, reward systems, narrative systems and others. Prerequisite: GAME 205
    Course Syllabus

  • GAME 209 Interactive Narrative Design

    This course examines the role of narrative in interaction design. Course topics include electronic narrative, including principles and techniques of segmentation, navigation, juxtaposition, encyclopedic storylines, and multiple points of view, approaches to non-linear narrative design. Prerequisite: GAME 207
    Course Syllabus

  • GAME 310 Animation

    This course investigates the fundamental principles of digital animation. This course will survey the historical development of the animated film and develop basic skills in preproduction, digital modeling, simulated movement, perception and the basics of digital animation. Additional topics covered include the relationships among; anatomy, motion, weight, and timing through a combination of individual and group projects. Prerequisites: GAME 205, 206 or GCAS 104, 205
    Course Syllabus

  • GAME 311 Interactive Sound Design

    This course provides an in-depth study of sound effect design and development within interactive contexts. Topics covered include the history of sound in games, the development of MIDI, audio production process, and approaches to non-linear sound design in games through a combination of individual and group projects. Prerequisite: GAME 205, 206
    Course Syllabus

  • GAME 312 Intermediate Portfolio Development

    This course focuses on refining the professional-grade portfolio started in GAME 205. Topics covered include occupational social-networking, industry-profiles, visibility and presentation. Prerequisite: GAME 206 and GAME 207
    Course Syllabus

  • GAME 313 User-Experience/User-Interface Design (UX/UI)

    This course provides an in-depth study of game interactivity, including the psychology of user interaction and methods for designing and developing effective interfaces. Combining their previous knowledge of game design and digital imaging with the concepts in this class, students will create portfolio-quality interface designs. Prerequisite: GAME 312
    Course Syllabus

  • GAME 314 Serious Games and Critical Play

    This course examines games and play as used for political, aesthetic and social purposes. Topics covered include the history and contemporary practice of games as performative objects, subversive play, and games for change. Prerequisite: GAME 312 or CGAS 312
    Course Syllabus

  • GAME 415 Advanced Digital Design

    This course is an advanced examination of the mastery of 2D and 3D visual design for games. It places an emphasis on using digital tools to produce visual asset art and pre- and post-production materials for portfolios and personal projects. Topics covered include the demonstration of a mastery of asset, interface and environment design. Prerequisite: GAME 313, 314
    Course Syllabus

  • GAME 416 Advanced Portfolio Design

    This course focuses on further refining the professional-grade portfolio started in GAME 105 in preparation for GAME 417 Internship/Final Project. Topics covered include jobs-research, interview strategies and presentations. Prerequisites: GAME 313 and GAME 314
    Course Syllabus

  • GAME 417 Internship/Thesis

    This course is the culmination of the program. Students are expected to acquire and successfully complete an internship with a game development studio. If an internship cannot be found, students will work on a final project supervised by the instructor. Prerequisite: GAME 415, 416

  • GD 100 Print Design Applications

    This course will provide the skills necessary to utilize the software commonly found in print design. Prerequisites: Basic computer literacy
    Course Syllabus

  • GD 105 Web Design Applications

    This course will provide the skills necessary to utilize the software commonly found in web design. Prerequisites: Basic computer literacy
    Course Syllabus

  • GD 112 Photoshop

    This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the bitmap software application Adobe Photoshop®. Through the use of exercises and projects, students will develop an extensive understanding of the tools and methods associated with the software. Real-world issues will be addressed to build problem solving and critical thinking skills necessary for advanced coursework.
    Course Syllabus

  • GD 116 Problem-solving and Idea Generation

    This course explores methods for generating original solutions to the creative problems faced in graphic design. The importance of research and research methods will also be emphasized.
    Course Syllabus

  • GD 210 Design Basics

    This course analyzes fundamental elements and principles of design necessary to solve graphic design problems. Topics including grids, hierarchy, contrast, balance, and color will be applied to print- and web-based projects. Problem solving and critical thinking skills will be further developed.
    Course Syllabus

  • GD 215 History of Contemporary Graphic Design

    This course examines the history of contemporary graphic design. Students evaluate and discuss contemporary design issues with emphases on the evolution of visual communication and its impact on contemporary design.
    Course Syllabus

  • GD 220 Fundamentals of Print Design

    This course examines the basic fundamentals specific to print design. The topics explored include typography, grid implementation, layout, white space, and color. Students will learn how a project goes from an initial idea to a final printed product.
    Course Syllabus

  • GD 230 Fundamentals of Web Design

    This course provides a theoretical overview of issues relating to web design. Topics include web standards, design problems, accessibility/usability, and hosting. Projects are based on research and presentations rather than technical applications.
    Course Syllabus

  • GD 260 Typography

    This course analyzes how typography is used properly and effectively in graphic design. Students gain skill with typographic terminology as the typographic relationship among graphic elements in symbolic communication is explored with various print- and web-based projects. Prerequisite: GD 116, GD 210 and GD 215, AND proficiency in current version of Adobe Creative Suite software
    Course Syllabus

  • GD 320 Single Page Design

    This course applies the fundamental concepts of graphic design through the creation of projects ranging from posters to business stationery and from one-color to multiple color projects with real-world specifications and issues. The use of project appropriate software will be established. Prerequisites: GD 220 and GD 260
    Course Syllabus

  • GD 332 Interactivity Basics

    This course provides and in-depth study of interactivity, including the elements of user experience and methods for designing and developing effective interactive interfaces. The fundamentals of design as related to interactivity and user experience will also be covered. Prerequisite: Proficiency in current Adobe Creative Suite Software and GD 230
    Course Syllabus

  • GD 339 Web Communication Methods

    This class will demonstrate how the grassroots journalism movement has taken hold, what the rules are, and how to communicate effectively in this arena.
    Course Syllabus

  • GD 350 Branding

    This course focuses on brand identity. Processes will be explored by designing print- and web-based projects related to brand strategy development and implementation. Research methods specific to design problem solving will be utilized. Presentation techniques are stressed and developed. Prerequisite: GD 260
    Course Syllabus

  • GD 355 Identity Design

    This course will focus on the creation of effective identity solutions (logos, logotypes and marks), typographic sets, and color palettes. Research of the client’s needs, the stakeholders and the audience will be utilized to establish solutions. Prerequisite: GD 350
    Course Syllabus

  • GD 420 Publication Design

    This course explores advanced methods and techniques with a focus on page layout and publication design. The full range of industry standard hardware and software will be utilized. Projects ranging from brochure to book design and layout will enable students to further develop their problem-solving skills and critical thinking abilities. Prerequisite: GD 320
    Course Syllabus

  • GD 430 Web Page Design

    This course covers the specific design needs and issues found in web design, such as color, contrast, placement and navigation. Prerequisite: GD 260 and GD 332
    Course Syllabus

  • GD 435 Website Development

    This course covers the skills and project-based experience needed for entry into web design and development careers. Prerequisite: GD 430

  • GD 490 Portfolio

    This is the capstone course for Graphic Design majors. Preparation for future employment or graduate study through a finished portfolio (both print- and web- based) of work for potential employment in the graphic design industry is emphasized. Resume development and self-promotion is also covered. Prerequisite: This course should be taken after all other major course work has been completed.
    Course Syllabus

  • GE 101 World Regional Geography

    Regional geographic study of humankind, the geopolitical world, global issues, and physical geography; discussion of fundamental principles of human and physical geography.
    Course Syllabus

  • GE 120 Geography of Tourism

    This course addresses the tourism potential of regional geographic areas, focusing on basic concepts of tourism, travel economics, perceptions of the world, and unique physical and cultural aspects of each region.
    Course Syllabus

  • GE 312 World Economic Geography

    Examination of world resources, industries, infrastructure, trade, and current economic and business trends from geographic perspective.
    Course Syllabus

  • GL 105 Physical Geology

    Development of a model of Earth’s internal structure and evolution through time, as well as the theory of plate tectonics (the unifying theory in geology), through geochemical and geophysical principles, the study of minerals and rocks, and the analysis of external and internal Earth processes.
    Course Syllabus

  • GL 204 History of the Earth

    Investigation of chronology of biological and geological events comprising 4.6 billion years of Earth history; discussions of the nature of the fossil record, development of the geologic time scale, interpretation of sedimentary rocks and their structures, and the evolution of life.
    Course Syllabus

  • HHP 109 Golf I

    This course will examine basic fundamental skills and mechanics in executing proper performance, terminology, scoring, and practical applications (practice) in the game of golf. This activity class has a course fee. (1 credit hr)
    Course Syllabus

  • HHP 112 Zumba Fitness

    This course provides an opportunity to participate in moderate exercise that combines Latin dancing with interval and resistance training. Dynamic routines, featuring unique moves and cominations, seek to build muscle tone and cardiovascular endurance for participants. No dance experience is necessary. (1 credit hr) HHP 112 is a six-week course.

  • HHP 117 Weight Training I

    This course provides an opportunity to participate in weight training activities designed toward improving muscular strength, endurance, and power. Instruction and practice in fundamental skills and proper techniques are offered to participants. No prior knowledge of weight training is necessary. (1 credit hr) HHP 117 is a six-week course.
    Course Syllabus

  • HHP 119 Varsity Sports

    These courses are designed to help the student/athlete learn team conduct, sportsmanship and academic standards at Bellevue University, these attributes will be beneficial for leadership development.

  • HHP 120 Varsity Sports

    These courses are designed to help the student/athlete learn team conduct, sportsmanship and academic standards at Bellevue University, these attributes will be beneficial for leadership development.

  • HHP 121 Varsity Sports

    These courses are designed to help the student/athlete learn team conduct, sportsmanship and academic standards at Bellevue University, these attributes will be beneficial for leadership development.

  • HHP 122 Varsity Sports

    These courses are designed to help the student/athlete learn team conduct, sportsmanship and academic standards at Bellevue University, these attributes will be beneficial for leadership development.

  • HHP 125 Sports Officiation

    This course is designed to provide students an overview of the rules, skills and techniques needed to officiate team sports such as baseball, basketball, football, soccer, softball and volleyball. Students will have the opportunity to apply concepts gained in the course through practical experiences.
    Course Syllabus

  • HHP 204 Wellness for Life

    This course examines the importance of lifetime wellness and nutrition. Topics include the value of nutrition, weight management, stress management, and exercise. An emphasis is placed on learning how to evaluate and improve current wellness patterns.
    Course Syllabus

  • HHP 205 Foundations of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation

    This course is designed to provide students an overview of the health and human performance fields. Elements related to physical activity such as fitness, sport and physical education will be examined. Students will be introduced to various career opportunities within the health and human performance industry and have the opportunity to explore those careers further through off-campus experiences.
    Course Syllabus

  • HHP 210 Sport Psychology

    This course addresses psychological aspects of sport performance such as learning, motivation, leadership, team interactions, and mental training. Application of these concepts will further enhance understanding and development of techniques leading to improved performance.
    Course Syllabus

  • HHP 230 Functional Anatomy

    This course will focus on the functional anatomy of the human body. As a foundational course, emphasis will be placed on the musculoskeletal system with relationship to the cardiac, nervous, and respiratory systems. Material will be presented with a practical approach.
    Course Syllabus

  • HHP 252 American Red Cross: Responding to Emergencies

    This course provides the citizen responder with the knowledge and skills necessary in an emergency to help sustain life and minimize pain and the consequences of injury or sudden illness until medical help arrives. Upon completion of this course the option to receive an American Red Cross First Aid Card and Adult, Child, and Infant CPR Card is provided. Automated External Defibrillator certification also is included.
    Course Syllabus

  • HHP 260 Athletic Coaching Theory I

    This course is designed to provide both practical and theoretical insights into the coaching and administrative aspects of organized sport. Emphasis is placed on developing a philosophical foundation for athletic coaching.
    Course Syllabus

  • HHP 270 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries

    This course addresses the responsibilities and skills of the athletic trainer, including health and wellness strategies for teams, evaluation and care of injuries, and applications of taping techniques to prevent injuries. Prerequisite: HHP230 or BI201
    Course Syllabus

  • HHP 300 Organization and Administration of Physical Education

    This course introduces students to practical management strategies for instructors in physical education programs at the elementary and secondary levels.
    Course Syllabus

  • HHP 310 Exercise Physiology

    This course provides students with an understanding of how the human body responds to exercise and exercise programs. Emphasis will be placed on the impact of exercise on the circulatory, respiratory, nervous, and skeletal systems of the body. Students will have the opportunity to apply effective exercise physiological concepts to a specific activity. Prerequisite: HHP230 or BI201
    Course Syllabus

  • HHP 320 Adapted Physical Education

    This course provides students with the knowledge and understanding of adaptive aspects in both the education and sport environments. Students will apply concepts in program organization and individual adaptations.
    Course Syllabus

  • HHP 350 Kinesiology and Body Movement

    This course explores the dynamics of human movement in an active setting. The opportunity to apply this knowledge to specific physical movements will be included. Prerequisite: HHP230 or BI201
    Course Syllabus

  • HHP 360 Athletic Coaching Theory II

    This course is designed to provide an application based approach to the coaching and administrative aspects of organized sport. Emphasis is placed on collegiate coaching and the application of various aspects of coaching such as budgeting, practice planning, and recruiting.
    Course Syllabus

  • HHP 375 Motor Learning

    The course addresses perceptual-motor development, fundamental motor patterns, and provides opportunities for students to facilitate movement learning and growth activities. The application of motor learning principles and theories will enhance understanding of the human motor system.
    Course Syllabus

  • HHS 255 Medical Terminology and Documentation

    This is an introduction to medical language and its documentation via a systems approach to terminology. Students will learn the essentials of documentation in a medical setting including the SOAP notes, basic record keeping, coding and reimbursement, HIPAA regulations and more.
    Course Syllabus

  • HHS 310 Skilled Nursing Care Management

    In this course the student will learn how to develop and implement services consistent with the resident’s needs and preferences by exploring the following: medical and nursing practices, activities of daily living, nutrition and food services, physical care and safety, customer service concepts, resident rights and civil liberties, documentation of services and meeting the psychosocial and spiritual needs of the residents.
    Course Syllabus

  • HHS 315 Normal Aging and Disease Changes

    The student will contrast the normal changes of aging against those caused by disease or injury. This will include psychosocial changes and the effect of societal and economic pressures on the elderly.
    Course Syllabus

  • HHS 320 Human Resource Management

    The student will develop policies that include federal, state, and local laws as they relate to resident care and employee interactions. They will analyze the aspects of planning, implementing and evaluation of recruitment, performance appraisal, training, marketing, confidentiality, and cultural diversity for healthcare employees.
    Course Syllabus

  • HHS 321 Client or Patient?

    Students will develop and implement services consistent with the diverse needs of people in a continuum of care including independent living, assisted living, adult day care, and residential care (unskilled). They will construct a model of needs, services, manpower, housing, food services, physical care and safety, resident's rights and liberties, ethics, documentation considerations, and basic regulatory and financial considerations.
    Course Syllabus

  • HHS 325 Home and Hospice Care

    The student will develop and implement services consistent for patients in a home and/or hospice care setting by exploring the following: medical and nursing practices, activities of daily living, nutrition and food services, physical care, security and safety, customer service concepts, transportation, ethics, documentation of services and the meeting the psychosocial and spiritual needs of the patients.
    Course Syllabus

  • HHS 330 Environment of Care (EOC) Management

    In this course the student will investigate three facets critical to long term healthcare facility management: Safety, Finance, and Patient Care including federal, state and local inspections and regulations.
    Course Syllabus

  • HI 101 History of Western Civilization I

    This course examines the evolution of Western Civilization from ancient times to 1715. It seeks to provide a comprehensive background for subsequent studies through emphasis on the social, political, economic, intellectual, and cultural development of Western Civilization.
    Course Syllabus

  • HI 102 History of Western Civilization II

    This course examines the evolution of Western Civilization from 1715 to the present. It seeks to provide a comprehensive background for subsequent studies through emphasis on the social, political, economic, intellectual, and cultural development of Western Civilization.
    Course Syllabus

  • HI 151 American History to 1877

    This course examines the major developments in America from the founding of the early colonies through the Reconstruction Era. Primary focus is placed on those concepts that have shaped the nation such as Constitutionalism, slavery, individualism, and Covenant among others.
    Course Syllabus

  • HI 152 American History from 1877

    This course examines the major developments in America from the period of the Industrial Revolution through modern times. Primary focus is placed on those concepts that have shaped the nation such as the free market, civil rights, Cold War, the role of government, and conformity among others.
    Course Syllabus

  • HI 313 Era of the American Revolution

    Detailed examination of the critical era between 1763 and 1789, when Americans severed their ties with the British Empire and launched an experiment in self-government. Primary emphasis is placed upon the conflict with Britain and the emergence of a unique philosophy of government.
    Course Syllabus

  • HI 314 Ancient History

    Survey of Western Civilization from the dawn of civilization in the Near East to the fall of the Roman Empire. Topics studied include Egyptian and Mesopotamian civilization, Ancient Greece, Hellenism, the Roman Republic, and the Roman Empire. Special emphasis on the thought systems involved in analyzing ancient history.
    Course Syllabus

  • HI 323 Civil War and Reconstruction

    This course provides an in-depth examination of the sectional conflicts which resulted in the Civil War, the War itself, and the period of Reconstruction which followed. Primary emphasis will be placed on the causes and impact of the War and the problems associated with the post-war settlement.
    Course Syllabus

  • HI 324 Medieval History

    Examines the era from the Fall of Rome to the Fall of Constantinople. Emphasis on medieval institutions such as the Papal Monarchy, Feudalism, the Crusades, and the Church. Additional attention is directed to Church-State conflict and the rise of Royal Authority.
    Course Syllabus

  • HI 334 Renaissance and Reformation

    This course examines the broad political, economic, social, intellectual, and cultural developments in Europe from the invention of the printing press to the end of the Thirty Years War. Key topics covered will include the Secularization of Culture, the Rise of Protestantism, and the Counter Reformation.
    Course Syllabus

  • HI 343 The Jazz Age and the Great Depression

    This course provides a detailed study of the primary developments in America between the end of World War I and American involvement in World War II. Primary emphasis will be on cultural conflict, the disillusionment of the wartime generation, isolationism, the Jazz Age, the collapse of American capitalism, and the emergence of the welfare state.
    Course Syllabus

  • HI 348 The French Revolution

    Explores the French Revolution as the central political event of modern European history. The forces it unleashed would be crucial in determining the next two centuries of change in Europe and in much of the rest of the world as well.
    Course Syllabus

  • HI 353 America Since 1945

    This course provides a detailed study of the significant developments in America from the end of World War II to the end of the Cold War. Primary emphasis will be placed on the Cold War, McCarthyism, the Civil Rights Movement, Viet Nam, and the Counter Culture.
    Course Syllabus

  • HI 355 Contemporary History of Western Civilization

    This course will examine the modern history of Western Civilization since the end of the Cold War. Its goal is to further develop the ability of students to apply historical methodologies and research programs to their understandings of recent history from the perspective of Western Civilization. Key events and topics that will be discussed are the end of the Cold War, the rise of US hegemony, post-Cold War conflict, the global economic recession, and 9/11 and the Global War on Terror.

  • HI 356 The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich

    Examines cultural, ideological, and political origins of National Socialism in Germany; the career and ideas of Adolf Hitler; the National Socialist state system; and the place of the Holocaust in historical and contemporary thought.
    Course Syllabus

  • HI 366 The Holocaust in History

    This course provides an in-depth analysis of the attempt to exterminate an entire people. Significant attention is directed to the Holocaust experience, the context of that experience, the response to the Holocaust, and its implications for our understanding of the human condition.
    Course Syllabus

  • HI 367 The Holocaust in Film

    Examines the ways in which the Holocaust has been represented, portrayed, examined and understood through the medium of film. Focuses on the difficulties faced by filmmakers in dealing with this topic and the difficulties faced by audiences in responding to the visualization of the experience.
    Course Syllabus

  • HI 375 The Second World War

    This course provides an intensive examination of World War II from an international perspective. The course focuses on such topics as collaboration, resistance, economic mobilization, social change, diplomatic relations, the Holocaust, and the course of the War. Greater emphasis is placed on the European theater.
    Course Syllabus

  • HI 380 America in Film

    The movies are an important part of the culture of the United States. The films that are made and that we choose to see both reflect and influence the way we perceive our lives, our relationships, our nation, and the world around us. Through the viewing and analysis of movies produced over the last three quarters of a century, HI 380 provides the opportunity to examine American history through the lens of Hollywood’s motion picture industry.

  • HI 384 Baseball and the American Experience

    Examination of the development of professional baseball and the role it has played in the American experience. The course asks students to examine a feature of American sport/entertainment/business as a means of understanding societal and cultural developments in general.
    Course Syllabus

  • HI 386 Gettysburg

    Drawing on Michael Shaara’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, The Killer Angels, and the epic film, Gettysburg (adapted from Shaara’s novel), this course chronicles the clash of Union and Confederate arms at Gettysburg July 1-3, 1863. The roles of notable participants such as Lee, Longstreet, Chamberlain, Meade, and Buford are examined, as is the outcome of this critical battle and its influence on the destinies of the Nation.
    Course Syllabus

  • HI 387 The Great Commanders

    Examination of military commanders, via a six-part video series. The series focuses on the following leaders: Alexander, Caesar, Napoleon, Nelson, Grant, and Zhukov. Student examine the life and exploits of each commander and focusing on a key battle investigate military command in a world where war proves to be just as much a part of life today as it has been throughout history. (Self-Study available)
    Course Syllabus

  • HI 389 The Great War (World War I) and The Shaping of the 20th Century

    This course looks at how “the war to end all wars” shaped the 20th Century. Students examine through an excellent video series and textbook, how weapons such as the machine gun and lethal gas were put to use on World War I battlefields, gauge the depth of suffering through autobiographical accounts of those at Verdun and the Somme, and assess the horror of the war through contemporary paintings and poetry.
    Course Syllabus

  • HI 411 Social and Political Movements in Western Civilizations

    This course is designed to introduce students to the broad social and political movements that have helped shaped the evolution of Western civilization. The class will include examination of industrialization, the enlightenment, and the technological revolution, with a focus on their impact on social and political development. Concepts such as democratization, gender and race relations, the social contract, and the Just War Tradition will also be explored.

  • HI 413 Economic Traditions in Western Society

    The study of international political economy is critical to understanding broader historical trends in western society. This course seeks to develop a firm understanding of how economics has intertwined with politics and international relations to develop a rich history within Western civilization. Concepts and issues examined will include capitalism, free trade, sustainable development, the Bretton Woods institutions, and orthodox vs. alternative development strategies.

  • HI 414 Political Systems in Western Society

    This course is designed as a critical study from a historical perspective of the variety of political systems that exist in Western societies. Systems to be examined include democracy, socialism, fascism, and dictatorships. While the philosophical foundations of these regime types will also be examined, the primary focus will be on the development and interactions of these systems viewed from a historical perspective.

  • HI 416 Hegemony and US Foreign Policy

    This class will examine the rise and current state of the US hegemonic position in international affairs. It will specifically focus on US foreign policy theories and philosophies since the end of WW II and how they have impacted the development of the national interest. Current US policies and behaviors will be critically compared to those of historical hegemons in order to ground the “US Century” in a broader historical context, and allow for direct analysis of the future of the US position.
    Course Syllabus

  • HI 418 Senior Thesis

    This course culminates in a major research paper in a subject matter of historical interest. Research leads to the production of a research proposal, an abstract, and with direction and consultation provided by the instructor through the course of the term, a polished draft of a major paper. This course is offered only as an Independent Study and has a prerequisite of 27 hours of history.
    Course Syllabus

  • HISC 298 Technology and Social History

    Study of societal development through technological changes. Inventions and processes in a historical timeline are studied to evaluate the influence each has had on humanity, culture, and social institutions.

  • HS 250 Statistics for the Human Services

    This course is designed to familiarize the student with the proper use of statistics and computers in the analysis of human services research data and the evaluation of practice and human services. Emphasis will be placed upon the appropriate use of various statistical procedures, the interpretation of data, and statistical analysis currently used in the profession of human services.
    Course Syllabus

  • HS 311 Introduction to Human Services

    Each of the many professions involved in human services approaches client and community needs from its own specialized perspectives and uses tools for assessment and treatment that vary from uses of media to prescription medications. Professional skills development in the interaction with social workers, counselors, psychologists, psychiatrists, and other professionals will be explored.
    Course Syllabus

  • HS 314 Social Deviance and Psychopathological Perspectives

    This course will explore evidence-based conceptualizations of both normal and disordered mental states, together with an examination of the etiology, development, manifestation, and potential treatment of mental disorders in infants, children, adolescents, and adults. The function and use of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-IV) is reviewed.
    Course Syllabus

  • HS 321 Research and Data Analysis

    All human services professionals must be able to find and accurately utilize information published in journals and scholarly books. This course puts emphasis on learning to recognize and analyze research types relevant to human services to extract key information. This course also will facilitate learning of basic descriptive statistics, graphing techniques, and standardized scores in measurement. The evaluation of ethical research will also be explored.

  • HS 338 Multicultural Perspectives in Human Services

    Addresses cultural, social, religious, and economic factors applicable to cultural, ethnic, and minority populations; both from the perspective of the culturally diverse client, and the counselor. Experiential methods of learning will be emphasized, including the development of self-awareness in the counselor. Traditional counseling theories, as well as more recent approaches to counseling diverse groups, will be analyzed for ethical and practical implications. The counselor’s role in addressing advocacy and justice will be explored.
    Course Syllabus

  • HS 339 Counseling Theories

    Counseling theories are useful guides for human services professionals as they identify key factors in assessment and treatment. This course introduces the “traditional” theories of psychodynamic, humanistic, and cognitive behavioral. Specialized counseling theories and techniques focused on ethnic identity issues, family problems, and recovery from substance abuse will be explored.

  • HS 412 Counseling Microskills for Human Service Professionals

    This course provides opportunities to practice a basic set of interviewing and helping skills commonly used in individual and group counseling. The course will explore the ethics and integrative applications of major counseling approaches and how to assimilate these into a sequential process that maximizes the possibility of facilitating change in patients. The course examines the concepts of “self” wellness as well to ensure safe and appropriate patient interactions.
    Course Syllabus

  • HS 421 Applied Human Growth and Development

    A comprehensive understanding of the nature and needs of persons at all the developmental levels and in multicultural contexts. Individual and family developmental theories and transitions, as well as theories of learning and personality development including knowledge about neurobiological behavior and resiliency are emphasized. Knowledge about human behavior as it relates to developmental crises, trauma-causing events, addiction, psychopathology, disability, and other factors that influence normal and abnormal behavior will be presented.
    Course Syllabus

  • HS 442 Treatment Strategies and Ethical Considerations

    Within the framework of professional ethics, a range of validated methods are analyzed in areas including clinical assessment and interventional procedures. The course will evaluated the gathering, interpretation, and application of treatment strategies with review of provider-patient interaction and an emphasis on appropriate professional behavior and protection of patient rights and responsibilities for all populations.

  • HS 451 Leadership and Management in Human Services

    This course emphasizes how a student will assess and develop personal management and leadership skills in the human services domain. This will include a focus on personal and corporate ethics and administrative challenges specific to the realm of human services organizations. In addition, the course will address employee assistance and evaluation, diversity, fundraising needs, organizational culture, and group/team dynamics within an agency.

  • HS 452 Positive Models of Self-Determination and Happiness

    This course addresses the topics of self-determination and happiness within the theoretical area of psychology referred to as “positive psychology.” Students explore issues such as how managing the quality of one’s emotional life is a foundation for self-determination. Traditional developmental and personality theories are integrated with positive psychology strategies to support efforts to apply the theoretical and empirical models of self-determination and happiness to their own lives.
    Course Syllabus

  • HS 453 Positive Models of Achievement and Performance

    This course addresses the topics of achievement and performance within the theoretical area of psychology referred to as “positive psychology.” Traditional trait or aptitude theories of achievement are contrasted with theories grounded in attitude and performance changes that involve active pursuit of important life goals. Performance quality is analyzed as the foundation of achievement and a strengths based perspective is used to guide students’ applications of the positive psychology, theoretical, and empirical models of performance and achievement to their own lives.
    Course Syllabus

  • HS 454 Positive Models of Creativity and Wisdom

    This course addresses the topics of creativity and wisdom within the theoretical area of psychology referred to as “positive psychology.” Traditional trait or personality theories of creativity and wisdom are contrasted with theories of active skill development. A strengths-based perspective is used to guide students’ applications of the positive psychology theoretical and empirical models of creativity and wisdom to their own lives.
    Course Syllabus

  • HS 460 Internship

    Consists of field placement in an agency, business, or industry environment related to the academic major. The placement should provide firsthand experience which allows students to apply, develop or strengthen classroom theories and skills. Work expectations for each intern are contracted with the faculty sponsor and placement supervisor. See Student Internship Program Guidelines for further details. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing (60 credit hours completed) and 2.5 GPA in the major – Permission of Director of Internships required.
    Course Syllabus

  • HU 101 Introduction to the Humanities

    This course focuses on basic concepts in the Humanities as they relate to everyday life and affect our choices and personal decisions. It examines how artists and thinkers make and convey meaning, how humans make sense of their life experiences, and how we define and shape values in relation to others.
    Course Syllabus

  • HU 105 Experiencing the Humanities through the Arts

    Introduces the Humanities through experiences in the fine arts. This class involves attending performances or presentations of the fine and performing arts. There is a student fee for tickets.
    Course Syllabus

  • HU 110 Western Humanities I

    Historical survey of humanities from the beginning of civilization to the Middle Ages. Designed to help students appreciate the humanities as they developed within cultures, integrating history, philosophy and the arts (particularly literature, sculpture, architecture, painting, and music).
    Course Syllabus

  • HU 120 Western Humanities II

    Historical survey of the humanities from the Renaissance to the present through the arts and philosophy, emphasizing the relationships between the arts and the ideas which defined western cultures and affected the lives of human beings. The course helps students comprehend values derived from reason and emotions in a world of increasing intellectual uncertainty. The arts studied include literature, music, painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, and film.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 102 Using Critical Thinking with Mathematics and Statistics

    This course examines how the power of numbers can help explain our lives and the world around us, from scheduling delays, to amortization schedules, from compound interest to car loans, chance, voting patterns, gambling odds, and modern physics.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 110 Audience Connections

    Provides instruction in research, including audience analysis, and the effective adaptation of speeches to audience and situation.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 111 Great Speakers and Speeches in History

    Analyzes speakers and speeches in historical context with emphasis on communicating ethically, credibility, and reasoning and logic.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 160 Introduction to Virtue Ethics

    An introduction to that branch of ethics known as virtue ethics, this course focuses on the development of character through the cultivation of classical virtues. The insights of classical philosophy about the concepts of virtue, vice, character, the good, happiness, love, and justice are compared and contrasted with the insights of more contemporary philosophers.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 201 The Wisdom of the Simpsons (and the End of Western Civilization!)

    This course uses the television program, The Simpsons, to ask basic questions about the meaning of human life, about society, and about contemporary values. It examines changes in our culture and thinking.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 202 Using Critical Thinking to Understand Western Civilization

    This course provides critical perspectives on Western Civilization and Culture. Besides examining the contributions of the Greeks, Romans, and Medieval and Renaissance Europeans, this course also investigates the Age of Science and Reason, the growth of democracy, modern capitalism and technology, and the Post-Modern world. Key concepts examined in the course include Western views of society, reason, mathematics, faith, science, religion, property, wealth, capitalism, progress, rights, democracy, and the state.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 206 The Anatomy of Health

    This course will be a survey of basic anatomy and physiology in health and illness with practical tips on prevention and first aid.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 211 From Socrates to Seinfeld: The Development of Human Thought

    This course investigates the major philosophical achievements from the Greeks to a twentieth century television program about “nothing.” It focuses primarily but not exclusively on moral and ethical ideas.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 216 Do No Harm

    This course will explore the progression of Hippocrates’ phrase, Do Not Harm, through the centuries and how philosophy has impacted the patient—provider relationship we have today.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 220 Using Critical Thinking to Understand Human Behavior

    This course applies critical thinking skills to human behavior. Topics include the self in society, truth versus beliefs, human nature and its origins, love, sex, and friendship, personal and social morality, learning and creativity, work and recreation, law, government, democracy, change and progress, war and peace, thought about God, and hope for the future.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 221 Real Morals for Real People

    This course examines the moral issues arising from the ongoing conflict between popular culture and serious traditional cultures. It does this by analyzing examples raised by an overview of the television programs, The Simpsons and Seinfeld, and the writings of the great philosophers.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 224 The Do’s and Don’ts of Investigations and Information Gathering

    This course will examine the history of the modern fact-finder and investigative decision-maker. It will cover leadership, team-building, and management strategies. It includes crucial aspects of the field, such as community liaison, witness issues, and working with the media.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 226 Bacterial Warfare: An Ancient Art

    This course will examine the impact of germs on history and analyze their continued impact on world events, populations and economies using examples of polio, smallpox, HIV, H1N1, and others.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 230 Digital Storytelling

    This course examines the processes and tools used in combining digital imagery and narration into a visual story. The application of storyboards, introductory level software, and the development of a personal voice will be used to develop a concept into a finished project.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 231 One World- Many People

    This course is an introduction to the many peoples and cultures of the world. Special attention will be given to the geography and identity of the major human communities on the planet.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 232 One World- Many Stories

    This course is an introduction to the variety of experiences and stories of the world’s people. Special attention will be given to autobiographical accounts of individuals as they deal with the traditions and lifestyles of their unique cultures.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 233 One World-Many Faiths

    This course is an introduction to the major religious faiths of the world. Special attention will be given to the beliefs, practices, stories, writings, and ethics of the world’s largest religious traditions.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 234 From Case Management to Court Room: Enhancing Case Prosecution

    This course will cover the basic methods of maritime security: investigation, emphasizing physical and electronic surveillance, interviewing, database and record-searching. It will also cover the use and essential role of the internet and technology in modern investigations in terms of how it can ultimately help, and if not done properly, hinder a case. Proper and thorough documentation, note-taking and report-writing is emphasized.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 235 Current Health Issues

    In this course the student will learn about the population of healthcare consumers noting the cultural, educational, environmental, and social factors impacting health. The students will also analyze the dynamic changes in health education for both the consumer and the providers of healthcare in the United States.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 244 Security and Law Enforcement – The Constitutional Umbrella

    This course will examine how important formal law is in terms of security in general and maritime security in particular. It will give an overview of fundamental constitutional rights and procedures while giving grounding in crucial maritime security duties.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 245 Health Education Across the Lifespan

    In this course the students will investigate the diversity of both the consumers and providers of healthcare and how that effects education and communication challenges. Students will explore age specific concerns, the disadvantaged population, and the mental health population and propose solutions to specific public health issues.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 250 China Yesterday

    Students examine the rich history of China to gain insights into the political, social, economic, and cultural challenges facing the Chinese people during their dramatic transformation today.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 251 China Today

    Students investigate important issues in contemporary Chinese politics, the economy, and social life, with a special emphasis on strategic challenges connected to China's changing role in international affairs.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 252 Chinese Philosophies and Religions

    Students examine the basic beliefs and practices of Taoism, Buddhism, and Confucianism, with a special emphasis on the roles of these traditional religions and philosophies in the dynamic culture of modern China.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 255 A Healthcare Dialogue

    In this course the students will review the age specific concerns of the elderly and how they will impact healthcare as a whole in the United States. They will explore leadership roles and responsibilities for consumer and provider communication on a variety of issues including ethics within their facilities. Finally, students will complete a project that involves communication solutions for a concern in their individual workplace.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 292 Temperament and Intelligence

    This course examines temperament and intelligence as they relate to learning and future success. It uses temperament analysis, multiple intelligences, and distinctions between types of minds and neurobiology to contrast active and passive living.

  • IGEN 293 Journeys of the Human Spirit in the Arts

    This course examines literature and artwork representative of the varying journeys of the human spirit. It will emphasize the triumph of the spirit even in the face of bleak and desolate external landscapes.

  • IGEN 300 Heroes and Anti-Heroes in Business

    This course analyzes the nature of heroism in the business world and examines a number of specific business heroes and anti-heroes.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 301 The Origins of American Consumerism

    Explores the origins of American consumerism—how our nation achieved one of the world’s highest standards of per capita wealth by the time of its founding and today enjoys the highest standard of living in the world. The course identifies and analyzes economic, intellectual, historical, and philosophical influences that have shaped our consumer culture.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 302 The History of Love and Sex

    Examines the differing manners in which love and sex have been viewed throughout recorded history.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 307 Music and the American Experience

    This course explores the role of music in shaping people’s perceptions about their place in society and in framing their responses to major historical events such as wars and social and political change.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 310 Heroes and Anti-Heroes in Popular Culture

    This course analyzes the nature of heroism in popular culture and examines a number of specific popular culture heroes and anti-heroes.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 311 The New Consumer Culture: The Department Store and the Dawn of Modern Advertising

    Traces the development of the new consumer culture from the Industrial Revolution to the birth of the department store, modern advertising, and the modern consumer economy. Investigates the story of this transformation of American culture by examining the historical, economic, philosophical, religious, and literary record.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 312 Love and Sex in the Arts

    Examines the depictions of love and sex in movies, television, the visual arts, and works of literature.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 314 Recent African History

    This interdisciplinary course examines African history since 1600 with an emphasis on sub-Saharan Africa. Students use cultural studies and works of modern literature to help explore the historical complexities of this diverse continent.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 317 Working Towards a Culture of Inclusion

    As organizations move toward inclusion as a means of leveraging diversity, it is imperative that employees understand the importance of inclusion, as well as the ways in which culture and identity influence our perceptions and behaviors in the workplace. Important skills include self- and cultural awareness, viewing issues from multiple perspectives, and managing bias.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 318 Leading a Diverse Workforce

    An effective organization must create a culture which embraces diversity. Business leaders need to promote and communicate inclusive attitudes and policies in order to capitalize on a diverse labor force. Important skills include welcoming a pluralistic workforce, mentoring potential talents, evaluating performance objectively, and resolving cultural conflicts in the workplace.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 319 Creating Value from Diversity in the Workplace

    Globalization has increased competitive pressures and opened up new opportunities. Organizations must monitor political, legal, economic, and demographic trends which can alter the workplace environment for entire industries. At the organizational level, leaders need to gauge the impact of diversity initiatives and adjust strategies appropriately based on evidence from established metrics.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 320 Heroes and Anti-Heroes in Philosophy and the Arts

    This course analyzes the nature of heroism in philosophy and the arts and examines a number of specific philosophers and artists who are heroes and anti-heroes.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 321 A Nation of Consumers: The “Malling” of America

    Investigates the shopping mall as an economic reality, as well as a transformational agent of American culture. The course traces the origins and growth of the American shopping mall as an agent and response to our vital consumer culture and examines the story of the shopping mall in the light of historical, economic, philosophical, and literary texts.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 322 Sex Sells: Advertising and the Erotification of the American Mind

    Examines the ways in which sexual imagery has been used in advertising to sell many different products and what this reveals about our cultural values.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 324 African Cultures

    This interdisciplinary course examines major cultural groups and modern societies of sub-Saharan Africa. Students use case studies, works of fiction, and historical analysis to gain a deeper appreciation for the challenges faced by African people in post-colonial times.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 330 Societies in the Information Age

    The information age has brought fundamental changes in how people live, work, and play. This course provides students with a much-needed framework for understanding the ways in which technologies transform and are transformed by societies. Students will explore the impact of technologies, both past and present, on our human relationships and cultural institutions.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 331 Ethics, Privacy, and Quality of Life in a Digital World

    Technological innovations should prompt us to pause and consider questions of ethics, privacy, and quality of life before the innovations are embraced or rejected at home or at work. Accordingly, classroom activities, discussions, and assignments will prompt students to connect professional codes of ethics to the use of current and emerging technologies and reflect on the ethical and social issues being raised.
    Course Syllabus

  • IGEN 334 Modern African Literature

    Students investigate African cultures and recent African history through literary works of Africa’s best modern writers.
    Course Syllabus

  • INVS 305 Theory and Practice of Investigations

    This course will provide a foundation and overview of the diverse field of investigations. The focus of the course will be on the investigative process and concepts and theories in investigations.

  • INVS 315 The American Criminal and Civil Legal Systems

    This course will provide an examination of the Constitutional underpinnings of criminal and civil law as it applies to the field of investigations. Special focus will be devoted to an overview of the American court system, specific elements of crime, the operation of civil jurisprudence, and a review of the policies and procedures that influence law in America.

  • INVS 325 Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Investigations

    This course will address ethical issues in investigations at both the theoretical and applied levels. Special emphasis will be given to an examination of the relationship between ethical principles, moral and normative judgments.

  • INVS 335 Information Gathering and Case Management

    This course will examine basic methods of investigation, information acquisition, and managing and prioritizing caseloads. Particular attention will be paid to database and record-searching, interviewing and interrogating, note taking and report writing, using logic and scientific methodology in investigations and case management approaches.

  • INVS 345 The Criminal Mind

    This course will focus on behavioral analysis and criminal offenders. Special focus will be devoted to forensic psychology, criminal behavior rationalization, deviant behavior, and crime causation theories.

  • INVS 405 Crime Scenes, Clues, Forensics and Evidence

    This course will cover the investigative process as it relates to crime scenes and evidence processing. Rules of evidence, types of evidence including latent fingerprints, fibers and other trace particle, firearms, tool marks, bloodstain patterns and DNA analysis will be emphasized.

  • INVS 415 Investigating Crimes Against Property and the Private Sector

    This course will examine the roles, responsibilities, and strategies of the professional in conducting investigations into crimes against property as well as the personal attributes of the private sector investigator. Investigations into the crimes of burglary, auto theft, fraud, and identity theft will be the focus, as well as private sector investigations into harassment, discrimination, and threats of violence in the workplace, workers’ compensation, asset protection, loss prevention, employee background checks, and theft of intellectual property.

  • INVS 425 Investigating Crimes Against Persons

    This course will examine the roles, responsibilities, and strategies of the Federal, State, and Local law enforcement personnel responsible for conducting criminal investigations into crimes perpetrated directly against individuals. Areas of focus will include the investigations into homicide, sexual assault, robbery, child abuse, and domestic violence.

  • INVS 435 Investigating Public Order Crimes

    This course will examine the roles, responsibilities, and strategies of the Federal, State, and Local law enforcement personnel responsible for conducting criminal investigations into crimes against society. Areas of focus will include narcotics trafficking, prostitution, hate crimes, terrorism, and other prevalent public order crimes.

  • ISPS 250 Triumph of the Nerds: An Irreverent History of the PC

    A self-study, video course (based on the PBS series) in which students explore the history and development of the PC; learn about the key players, companies, and technologies; appreciate the market forces at play; and identify and analyze the effects of computers on people and society. The course is designed for both technical and nontechnical students.
    Course Syllabus

  • ISPS 290 Money and Morality

    An interdisciplinary course, topics include postmodernism, consumerism, free market economics, Keynesianism, Marxism, shopping malls, whistle blowing, insider trading, corporate responsibility, and more.
    Course Syllabus

  • ISPS 393 Conservative Economics

    The course focuses on the principles and processes of economic activity based on private ownership, entrepreneurship, free markets and U.S. Constitutional government. Textbooks include the classic works of Nobel laureate Friedrich Hayek, Henry Hazlitt, Thomas Sowell, Nobel laureate Milton Friedman, and other authors in the conservative economic tradition. The course also seeks to analyze the processes and principles of socialism and hampered market economies. Prerequisites: Junior status or permission of the instructor
    Course Syllabus

  • ITOP 300 IT Infrastructure

    This course provides an overview of IT infrastructure issues from a systems perspective. Topics related to both computer and systems architecture and communication networks are addressed, with an overall focus on the services and capabilities that IT infrastructure solutions enable in an organization. Topics also include IT as a service organization, assessing IT infrastructure capabilities and limitations within an organization, and building a business case.
    Course Syllabus

  • ITOP 320 Leadership and Team Building

    This course examines the critical roles and functions of leadership and focuses on exploring individual leadership style. Topics include assessing leadership abilities, building effective teams, and communicating as a leader. Emphasis will be placed on evaluating the effects of individual and organizational influences on team processes and performance.
    Course Syllabus

  • ITOP 340 Business Communications

    This course provides an introduction to forms, styles and methods used in business communication. Coverage includes practice of oral communication, listening skills, and written correspondence. Topics include project proposals and status updates, meeting dynamics, communicating change, performance reviews, and the presentation of technical and quantitative information.
    Course Syllabus

  • ITOP 360 Foundations of Fiscal Management

    This course explores the key elements of finance and accounting used by managers to support long- and short-term decisions, including balance sheets, income statements, cash flow, budgeting, activity-based costing, performance measures, and compensation issues.

  • ITOP 400 IT Systems Management

    This course explores the management of IT systems. Topics include system availability, performance and tuning, production acceptance, change management, problem management, storage management, network management, configuration management, capacity planning, security, and business continuity.

  • ITOP 420 Managing Emerging Technologies

    This course explores the latest technologies and addresses the impact, benefit and challenges of adapting and introducing emerging technologies into an organization. Evaluating and planning for the integration of emerging technologies is explored.

  • ITOP 440 IT Project Management

    This course provides a foundation for project management in the context of information technology projects. Coverage includes initiating, planning and executing strategies that lead to completion of successful projects. Scenario-based case studies will be incorporated with emphasis on the importance of making strategic changes that can create competitive advantage.

  • ITOP 460 Managing Vendors and Contracts

    This course applies leadership and management concepts to the process of managing vendors and contracts. It includes a focused study of the methodologies used to select and manage vendors. It also examines the selection process used for technology sourcing options (custom development, standard package purchase, outsourcing, etc.,) as well as Request for Information (RFI), Request for Quote (RFQ) and Request for Proposal (RFP); types of contracts, contract selection, vendor selection and vendor relationships

  • ITOP 480 IT Strategy, Management and Delivery

    This course focuses on the strategic role of information technology within an organization. Topics include managing and integrating information systems, defining information infrastructure and systems to support organizational structure, assessing the impact of emerging technologies, and protecting business assets. Students will complete a project which synthesizes the material presented throughout the previous courses.

  • JLS 305 Theory and Practice of Justice, Law and Security

    This course will provide a foundation and overview of the diverse but interrelated disciplines of justice, law and security. The focus of the course will be on the development of justice and law, concepts and theories in criminal justice, and the security of our nation.
    Course Syllabus

  • JLS 315 The American Criminal and Civil Legal Systems

    This course will provide an examination of the Constitutional underpinnings of criminal and civil law as it applies to the fields of criminal justice, law and security management. Special focus will be devoted to an overview of the American court system, specific elements of crime, the operation of civil jurisprudence, and a review of the policies and procedures that influence law in America.
    Course Syllabus

  • JLS 325 Professional Responsibility and Ethics

    This course will address ethical issues in justice, law and security at both the theoretical and applied levels. Special emphasis will be given to an examination of the relationship between ethical principles, moral and normative judgments.

  • LA 102 Online Student Success Program

    This course provides information and builds skills that will enhance the student’s success in the online learning environment. Students are introduced to the online classroom, online communication and community, strategies for effective reading and writing, learning skills and resources. (2 credit hours)

  • LA 105 Success in Higher Education

    This course provides information and skills for the student’s success in college and learning, in general. Time management, active learning and reading and writing skills are taught and modeled by different departments at the university and practiced by students. (1 credit hr)
    Course Syllabus

  • LA 106 Academic Excellence

    This course is designed to assist students with the refinement of academic skills in preparation for maximum academic performance. The objective of this course is to apply strategies learned to other courses taken in the concurrent semester.

  • LA 400 American Vision and Values

    Focuses on the political and philosophical traditions of the western world, especially as they are found in the American vision and embedded in the values, traditions, documents, and institutions of the United States.
    Course Syllabus

  • LA 410 Tradition and Change

    Begins with world traditions and investigates how social, economic, intellectual, and moral forces of change act against them. The course focuses on the tensions between tradition and change in the production of intellectual, social, and cultural progress. The course emphasizes intense student involvement in a comprehensive learning experience, culminating in a formal written thesis that confronts the values of limited government, popular rule, entrepreneurial processes, and reflective inquiry.
    Course Syllabus

  • LA 420 Freedom and Responsibility

    Focuses on the institutions and traditions of Western civilization that are found at the core of American democracy. Central focus is on the balanced relationship between freedom and the responsibilities involved in the ongoing maintenance of freedom in a just and productive society.
    Course Syllabus

  • LA 440 Study Abroad - Perspectives on the Kirkpatrick Signature Series

    This multi-national course takes students to England, Scotland, and the border lands of Wales to see the sights, locations, tombs and documents of the men whose writings are the foundations of the Kirkpatrick Signature Series. During the day, students will walk in the footsteps of Lennon and Marx as well as Locke, Mills, Smith, Franklin and others that influenced America’s founders. Sights include Stonehenge, Oxford, Parliament and Buckingham Palace. In the evenings, students can explore more contemporary aspects of English life. Prerequisite: Successful previous completion of the KSS is required.

  • LGLS 305 Theory and Practice of Law

    This course will provide a foundation and overview of the legal discipline. The focus of the course will be on the development of justice and law, on constitutional concepts and theories and on the political and judicial systems in our country.

  • LGLS 315 The American Criminal and Civil Legal Systems

    This course will provide an examination of the Constitutional underpinnings of criminal and civil law as it applies to the fields of criminal justice, law, investigations and security management. Special focus will be devoted to an overview of the American court system, specific elements of crime, the operation of civil jurisprudence, and a review of the policies and procedures that influence law in America.

  • LGLS 325 Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Law

    This course will address ethical issues in law using the various state codes of professional responsibility. Special emphasis will be given to an examination of the relationship between ethical principles, and moral and normative judgments.

  • LGLS 335 The U.S. Legal System and the Judicial Process

    An examination of the origins of the American system of jurisprudence will include a comparative analysis with prominent international legal systems. This course will provide an overview of the structure of the American court system and will define the complex notion of jurisdiction.

  • LGLS 345 Legal Research, Analysis and Writing

    This course explores the myriad resources available for legal research and reporting, case-law analysis and the repositories for statutory, administrative, and judicial rule and decision-making. Extensive practical writing applications for legal briefs, memoranda and professional communication will utilize a case-study methodology.

  • LGLS 405 Constitutional Law, Liberty and Emerging Policy

    In depth examination of the historic underpinnings of the Constitution and Bill of Rights will focus on the role of the judiciary in the creation of public policy and the expansion of civil liberties. Critical analysis will focus upon developing predictive models for judicial decision-making and the ongoing debate about the role of the judiciary in America.

  • LGLS 415 Judicial and Administrative Practices: Civil and Criminal Procedure

    Practical application of the rules of civil and criminal procedure will be examined with a focus on the impact of these rules on the administration of the court system. Special attention is devoted to service of process, disclosure, discovery, search and seizure and confrontation rules as well as an examination of minimum sentencing guidelines and trends in civil and criminal penalties.

  • LGLS 425 Legal Applications for Contemporary American Business and Social Organizations

    Critical analysis of the application of laws impacting the operation of modern capitalist structures, businesses and social organizations. In depth examinations of the role and restrictions of tort law, products liability, principles of contract and the Uniform Commercial Code will be conducted. Human resource regulation, bankruptcy, securities regulation and priority interest analysis will be applied using case study methodology.

  • LGLS 435 The Rule and Role of Law in Matters of Life and Death

    This course will provide concrete analysis of the application of law to the administration of property rights, real estate, risk assessment, tax and investment policy formulation. Special emphasis will be provided for an assessment of the societal impact of probate, estate and gift taxation and regulation, and a review of laws applied to schools, foundations, philanthropy and other social organizations.

  • LITC 297 Literature and the Marketplace

    Explores economic themes in English and American literature, using critical approaches (Marxist, feminist, post-structural, psychoanalytical) to come to terms with the texts. The course includes such works as Shakespeare’s Merchant of Venice, Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, Henry James’ Washington Square, and Arthur Miller’s Death of a salesman.

  • LITC 298 Literature and Technology

    Explores the constructive and destructive potentials of technology and the manager’s ethical responsibilities as liaison between technical and humanistic constituencies. The course includes such works as Mary Shelly’s Frankenstein, Kurt Vonnegut’s Cat’s Cradle and Player Piano, Anthony Burgess’ Clockwork Orange, and Jerzi Kosinski’s Being There.
    Course Syllabus

  • MA 100 Introduction to Algebra

    Development of mathematics skills needed for practical problem solving important in our society today. Students also have the opportunity to acquire and demonstrate skills needed for follow-on courses in algebra or descriptive statistics. Topics include: arithmetic and problem solving, basic units of measure, geometric applications and elements of algebra. MA 100 does not apply to General Education Core Curriculum requirement for the major, but does apply to minimum graduation requirements.
    Course Syllabus

  • MA 101 Intermediate Algebra

    Development of basic algebraic skills. Includes the real number system; operations for polynomials and rational expressions; solutions and applications of linear and quadratic equations; and the solution of inequalities, systems of linear equations and radical equations. Prerequisite: MA 099 or MA 100, or satisfy MPE
    Course Syllabus

  • MA 102 College Algebra

    Expansion and follow-up of intermediate algebra including higher order polynomials and nonlinear inequalities, and use of matrices and determinants to solve systems of equations. Introduction to function, inverse function, theory of equations and exponential and logarithmic functions. Prerequisite: MA 101 or satisfy score on mathematics placement exam (MPE)
    Course Syllabus

  • MA 200 Calculus for Management, Social, and Life Sciences

    Differential and integral calculus and application to solutions of real problems involving rate of change, optimization, revenue, cost, marginal analysis, demand and profit functions, and economic growth rate. Application of calculus in social and life sciences includes population growth, learning curves, work curves, marginal utilities, bacterial growth, and the spread of epidemics. Prerequisite: MA 102
    Course Syllabus

  • MA 240 Applied Statistics

    Provides the theoretical basis and the problem solving experience needed to apply the techniques of descriptive and inferential statistics, to evaluate such daily inputs as organizational reports and to improve decision making over a wide range of areas. Topics include: Descriptive Measures; Distribution Shapes; Concepts of Probability of Discrete and Continuous Random Variables; Hypothesis Testing of One, Two Samples; Chi-Square and F-Test; Regression; Anova; Using Excel, Minitab, TI 83+ or SPSS for Solving & Interpreting Statistical Problems. Prerequisite: MA101 (4 credit hrs)
    Course Syllabus

  • MAQC 620 Project Management

    In this course, students will learn to interpret the role of professional responsibility in project management and evaluate the application of the proper project management tools and techniques to create a project plan. The course also will allow students to determine the necessary components to create a project schedule including critical path, PERT, and Gantt charts. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610
    Course Syllabus

  • MAQC 660 Business Decision for Contracting

    This course focuses on the pre-award business and contracting knowledge necessary to process complex procurement with an emphasis on the following topics: business relationship, strategic sourcing, risk management, contract financing, subcontracting plans, source selection, and contractor responsibility. Students can apply the knowledge learned to practical exercises involving acquisition planning, source selection, and award of technical support service contracts. Additional topics include service case communication, teaming and leadership, customer analysis, spend analysis, multiple award IDIQ, and formal source selection. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610
    Course Syllabus

  • MAQC 670 Legal Considerations in Contracting

    This course focuses on the legal considerations in the procurement process with an emphasis on contract law, fiscal law, protests, assignment of claims, subcontracting, dispute and claims, fraud, debt, and terminations. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610
    Course Syllabus

  • MAQC 675 Cost Analysis and Negotiation Techniques

    This course focuses on cost analysis and negotiation techniques and topics including cost analysis, quantitative techniques, indirect cost, accounting and est. systems audits, FCCM, profit analysis, and negotiations of acquisition planning, cost analysis, negotiation, and contract administration. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610
    Course Syllabus

  • MBA 600 Survey of Accounting

    This course is designed to provide students with an overall understanding of the manner in which a business gathers, processes, and uses information. Students are introduced to basic accounting and computer concepts and procedures through case studies and computer projects. Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of basic accounting processes and principles, on data management in a computerized environment, and on basic financial statements. Students also are expected to develop an appreciation of the needs for internal controls in a business. Issues relating to internal control procedures, computer security, privacy issues and ethics will be introduced through readings and case studies. Prerequisite: Graduate standing
    Course Syllabus

  • MBA 605 Human Capital: Self-Development and Communication

    This course explores the development of human capital, including self-diagnostics, learning management, cognitive and metacognitive strategies, and the acumen necessary to communicate with and influence various stakeholders in a complex and interconnected global business environment. Students will practice using knowledge gathering and knowledge sharing tools for effective decision making; and will begin to master business communication skills including writing, speaking and presenting. Prereq: Graduate Standing
    Course Syllabus

  • MBA 606 Critical Thinking & Applied Problem Solving

    This course examines the use of critical thinking methods, mental models, and qualitative and quantitative decision making and problem solving methods to shape successful organizations. Emphasis is placed on the role of judgment development and how experience, research, knowledge, and group dynamics can lead to quality business analysis and shape effective decisions. Prereq: Graduate Standing
    Course Syllabus

  • MBA 608 Capitalism & Economic Reasoning

    This course reviews the history of capitalism, with a focus on the modern implications of American Capitalism to business and policy decision-making today. It also explores competing systems and compares the economic, political, and personal freedoms that define our market-based system in relation to others. The course will use both focused and integrative analyses of key micro- and macroeconomic, accounting, finance, and marketing concepts, and their role in shaping the creation and growth of American business enterprises, and in defining and measuring their success. Students will begin the journey of learning how to reason like an economist and understand system impact in their analysis, decision making, and judgment making. Prerequisite: MBA 605 and MBA 606. For MSBAN students – No prerequisite required.
    Course Syllabus

  • MBA 610 Applications of Data Analysis for Effective Decision Making

    This course is about the art of analyzing and summarizing data, and converting it into useful information for the purpose of solving business problems and making sound business decisions. Graphs, tables, number summaries, correlation, and regression are among common tools which enable a manager to explore patterns in the data and discover relationships among variables, all of which are major focus in this class. Additionally, students learn about random variables and various distributions, as well as their relevance to business decisions such as stock prices, waiting lines, inventory control, project management, and quality decisions. Finally, to put course content into perspective and demonstrate its relevance to the business environment, students learn specifically how to use time-series data and graphical tools to make forecasting and quality management decisions, as well as use visual and numerical tools to manage time and cost of projects. Prerequisite: MBA 605, MBA 606, and MBA 608
    Course Syllabus

  • MBA 611 Economics

    This course presents fundamental micro and macroeconomic concepts relevant to managers and other policymakers in business and government. Students are challenged to recognize, apply, and assess these concepts to decision making in business management and public policy. Students address the applicability of economic concepts to themselves, businesses, and society. Concepts and implications fundamental to the market supply and demand economic framework are addressed with an emphasis on their application to the firm and individual. Additionally macro-economic concepts, including an overall aggregate model of the economy are addressed. Students are encouraged to take a holistic view of how economic concepts impact the firm. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610
    Course Syllabus

  • MBA 612 Financial Strategy

    Fundamental principles and practices relevant to a firm’s financial strategy are addressed. Emphasis is on conceptual foundations and analysis of how financial fundamentals impact corporate financial strategies and the efficient allocation of wealth resources. Topics include: key elements of financial environments, market efficiency, financial analysis, cash flow, incentive theory and practice, agency problems, time value of money, security valuation, risk analysis, portfolio theory and practice, capital budgeting, capital structure, dividend policies, options, global financial concerns, and contemporary financial issues. Prerequisites: MBA 600, 605, 606, 608 and 610. For MSBAN students – MBA 600, MBA 608, and MBA 610 or BAN 600.
    Course Syllabus

  • MBA 613 Healthcare Finance

    This course is an introduction to financial management in the healthcare industry. The course includes general accounting principles, analysis of financial statements, financial planning, and variance analysis as well as an introduction to the economics of today’s healthcare environment including fund flows, markets and marketing, productivity, strategic planning, cost effectiveness, and capital finance/structure. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610
    Course Syllabus

  • MBA 621 Healthcare Organizational Design and Delivery Systems

    This course introduces students to healthcare organizational structures with an emphasis on the topics of governance, structure, networks, and employee performance. The issues of healthcare costs, access, and quality, within managed care systems and collaborated networks will be addressed.
    Course Syllabus

  • MBA 626 Operations Management Strategies in a Global Context

    This course explores the operations function and the role it plays in attaining and maintaining a competitive edge in the domestic and global markets. It is an overview of how the operations function interfaces with marketing and finance functions to ensure demand for the organization's goods and services. Emphasis is placed on how to acquire and manage necessary resources, and how to plan and control the transformation of those resources into goods and services. Applications in both service and manufacturing organizations are included. Prerequisites: MBA 600, 605, 606, 608, and 610. For MAQC students - MBA 600 and MBA 610. For MSBAN students – MBA 600 and BAN 600.
    Course Syllabus

  • MBA 633 Advanced Organizational Behavior

    This course encourages the application of advanced conceptual and theoretical perspectives to the analysis and control of behavior in organizations. Students will practice diagnosing and resolving behavioral and organizational problems related to management functions, individual differences, group and interpersonal conflict, and work/life interface. Includes emphasis on perception, motivation, leadership, influence, work/family conflict, stress, decision making, diversity, organizational learning, ethics, global issues and change. Prerequisites: For MAQC students - MBA 600 and MBA 610.
    Course Syllabus

  • MBA 634 Advanced Organizational Management and Theory

    This class encourages the application of advanced conceptual and theoretical perspectives to the design of organizations and the linkage mechanisms that organizations must develop to manage their environments. Students will practice diagnosing and resolving organizational problems related to the growth, survival, and decline of organizations. Research emphasis will be placed on how size, structure, technology, and organizational culture impacts operations, strategic contingencies, and competitive advantage. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610
    Course Syllabus

  • MBA 639 Strategic Management

    The purpose of the capstone experience is to reinforce the knowledge, skills and abilities gained from the program. The student will take the knowledge gained from the other courses in the program and apply it to the development and execution of an organization’s business strategy. It will also provide opportunities for students to strengthen their portfolios with material developed throughout the program and to focus on particular needs that may have come to light during the program. Prerequisites: 33 hours in major and taken during last term of coursework
    Course Syllabus

  • MBA 642 Managerial Accounting

    This course provides an understanding of management information systems used in decision making processes. It is designed with a hands-on approach, encourages participation and interaction through the use of computer projects, case studies, and classroom discussions. Topics include basic cost accounting concepts and terminology, product costing and pricing, planning and controlling a business operation through budgets and variance analysis, and managerial decision-making using such techniques as cost volume-profit analysis and variable costing. Computers and appropriate computer software will be used. Prerequisites: MBA 600, 605, 606, and 608
    Course Syllabus

  • MBA 652 Marketing Strategy

    This course examines the key concepts and issues in developing and selecting a marketing strategy. Developing and implementing dynamic marketing strategies that are adaptable to changing conditions are emphasized. It examines processes that enable the domestic and/or international organization to continually learn from competitors, customers and other stakeholders with the objectives of developing marketing strategies that are essential to both obtaining and sustaining a competitive advantage. Students can gain career experience in marketing by analyzing various corporate dilemmas and developing strategies throughout the course along with creating marketing plan. Prerequisite: MBA 605, 606, and 608. For MSBAN students – MBA 608.
    Course Syllabus

  • MBA 664 Marketing Research

    This course is designed to provide students with a means to obtain information for more effective marketing decision making. The essential concepts of marketing research and methods used to conduct research to help solve marketing problems will be emphasized. Both quantitative and qualitative research methods will be covered in the course and how these two approaches are best utilized to address a variety of marketing problems. Students are expected to obtain marketing research data and apply it to a variety of actual marketing problems. Prerequisites: MBA 600, MBA 610, and MBA 652
    Course Syllabus

  • MBA 665 Advanced Law

    This course is a comprehensive study of law and its application in business operations and examines the influence of political, social, and regulatory issues on the formation and interpretation of the law. Topics include contracts, negotiable instruments, bankruptcy, agency and employment relationships, and property concepts. Emphasis is placed on applying these concepts to business decisions while considering both ethical and global perspectives. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610
    Course Syllabus

  • MBA 667 Regulation and Ethics for International Business

    This course is an examination of the basic categories of regulations and laws to develop the framework within which organizations operate in the global economy. The international framework will be contrasted with the one constraining domestic operations. Skills in making ethical, strategic decisions within this framework will be developed through comprehensive international case problems. Ethical and moral analysis will examine issues in human rights, environmental considerations, investment, and social responsibility considerations. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610
    Course Syllabus

  • MBA 668 Legal and Regulatory Compliance Issues in Healthcare

    This course provides an overview of federal and state regulations that affect and influence the healthcare industry. Topics include Medicare, Medicaid, privacy laws, medical malpractice, licensure and certification, institutional and personal liability, and ethical issues. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610
    Course Syllabus

  • MBA 670 Essentials of Supply Chain Management in a Global Environment

    This course examines classical and contemporary issues in managing supply chains in domestic and global environments. The capabilities that a supply chain must have to support a firm’s business strategy are studied. Students learn to analyze and assess the strategic role of the supply chain and the fundamental issues in managing them. Methodologies for designing and planning a supply chain are introduced and methods to apply them in supply chain activities are learned. Prerequisites: For MAQC students – MBA 600 and MBA 610
    Course Syllabus

  • MBA 672 Models in Supply Chain Management

    This course introduces models to frame, structure, and solve decisions which pertain to various aspects of supply chain management. Students can learn how to apply these models and how to use the solutions in decision-making from a cross-functional business perspective. Through the examination of various models and benchmark cases, students will learn to recognize, structure, analyze, and develop decisions which have supply chain implications.
    Course Syllabus

  • MBA 674 Emerging Topics in Supply Chain Management

    With the business environment constantly changing, new strategies and topics in supply chain management emerge continuously. This course is devoted to bring such topics to the foreground. It examines the emerging issues by evaluating their immediate and long-term impact on traditional supply chain management theories as well as other business disciplines and practices. Contemporary readings and guest speakers supplement traditional academic literature and textbooks as the topics are fluid and very dynamic.
    Course Syllabus

  • MBA 676 Information Technology Practices for Managing the Supply Chain

    This course examines the importance of various technology-driven practices which affect the performance of supply chains, such as timely information sharing, reducing lead times, and reducing inventory levels, are examined. Software and products used in managing supply chains, such as Vendor Managed Inventory (VMI), are introduced. The advantages and disadvantages of each are analyzed, and students learn how they benefit the enterprise and how to propose choices for various industries.
    Course Syllabus

  • MBA 677 Logistics Management

    The course provides students with a thorough overview of the Logistics Management concepts and their interface with other functional areas. Students will learn about activities involved in moving and storing materials and information through the supply chain. Course activities include developing and integrating models of procurement, transportation, warehousing, materials handling and information storage. Problem solving projects and assignments require basic knowledge of Excel and Access. Prerequisites: For MAQC students – MBA 600 and MBA 610
    Course Syllabus

  • MBA 685 Internship in Business Administration

    This course provides an opportunity for students to expand their learning by gaining experience in the workplace. The learning objectives and specific program of study must be developed in consultation with the College of Business (CoB). These objectives will be documented through oral or written reports as required by the faculty sponsor. The internship application must be approved in advance of registering for the course. Contact the CoB office for details. Prerequisites: 1. Graduate students must have earned a minimum of 18 credit hours in the CoB. 2. No current grade below a C. 3. Cumulative GPA of 3.0.
    Course Syllabus

  • MBA 699 Topics in Business Administration

    This course provides an opportunity for students to customize their business administration degree curriculum by pursuing advanced work in topic areas not addressed or only briefly addressed in other business courses. Specific programs of study must be developed in consultation with a full-time College of Business faculty member. Emphasis will be placed on advanced research in current business issues.
    Course Syllabus

  • MCAP 658 Measurement and Evaluation of Human Capital

    Many management programs fail because of poor metrics. We have mastered the art of ROI with regards to tangible investments, but often times fall short when trying to measure human performance. This course introduces participants to the concept behind designing a system that can measure performance and ROI. Prerequisites: MCAP 549 OR MBA 522, and MBA 541

  • MCC 500 Helping Relationships

    This course guides students through the core elements of the helping relationship process. The major focus of this course is on the attending behaviors and interviewing skills utilized in the helping relationship. This course will also orient you to the graduate school process as well as encourage the development of a professional mindset, counselor characteristics, and an attitude of lifelong learning as a human service professional.

  • MCC 501 Helping Relationships and Orientation to the Counseling Profession

    This course assists the student in obtaining and demonstrating proficiency in basic helping skills associated with the practice of professional counseling and helping relationships. Students explore how these skills relate to their roles as members of interdisciplinary emergency management teams, including providing crisis intervention, disaster relief, and psychological first aid within the communities they serve. This course further explores the history, philosophy, and trends associated with the field of professional counseling. Personal characteristics influencing the helping process, as well as self-care strategies of the professional counselor are addressed.

  • MCC 502 Introduction to Counseling Theories

    This course addresses major theoretical perspectives, practices, and their applications commonly associated within the field of professional counseling. Students explore applying counseling theory based on an examination of client factors, issues, and presenting concerns within a multicultural context. This course further explores the history, philosophy, and trends associated with the field of professional counseling.

  • MCC 503 Statistics and Quantitative Research Methods

    This course orients the student to statistical concepts and measurements including scales of measurements, distributions, central tendency, validity, and reliability. Quantitative research method design is addressed. Students explore the role of research as it relates to evidenced-based practice as professional counselors.

  • MCC 504 Qualitative Research Methods and Program Evaluation

    This course integrates and expands upon the content in MCC 503 addressing qualitative research methods, single-case design, action oriented, and outcome-based research. Needs assessment and program evaluation techniques are addressed, including their role in program development, improvement, and modification for clinical mental health programs. Prerequisite: MCC 503

  • MCC 505 Counseling Practicum

    In the counseling practicum, students demonstrate knowledge of and skills in personal/social, academic, and career development domain assessments and individual and group interventions appropriate to a variety of adult counseling settings. Course includes a minimum of 100 clock hours of practicum. At least 40 hours of the practicum experience involved direct client contact. Prerequisites: Foundation Courses.

  • MCC 506 Counseling Practicum

    In the counseling practicum, students demonstrate knowledge of and skills in personal/social, academic, and career development domain assessments and individual and group interventions appropriate to a variety of adult counseling settings. Course includes a minimum of 100 clock hours of practicum. At least 40 hours of the practicum experience involved direct client contact.

  • MCC 510 Research Methods

    In this course students will explore research models in the human services. Standard research design issues and procedures will be addressed including experimental, program evaluation, quasi-experimental, qualitative, and case study designs. Skills in reading empirical reports, evaluating the quality of such reports, and integrating research evidence into practice will be emphasized.

  • MCC 512 Program Evaluation

    An introduction to the basic concepts and models of program evaluation as applied to the human services. Topics include: planning an evaluation, evaluation designs, selecting criteria and setting standards, basic measurement principles and tools, ethical considerations in conducting a program evaluation, and preparation of a program evaluation proposal. (MSFYS degree only)

  • MCC 513 Theories of Psychopathology

    This course will explore evidence-based conceptualizations of both normal and disordered mental states, together with an examination of the etiology, development, manifestation, and potential treatment of mental disorders in infants, children, adolescents, and adults.

  • MCC 515 Professional Orientation, Ethics and Legal Issues

    This course provides an opportunity for students to consider theoretical and practical ethical standards for working with individuals in a variety of human service settings. Students will self-assess their values and professionalism and prepare for future professional growth in a variety of counselor roles including supervision, advocacy, and crisis response. Emphasis will be on ethical codes of professional organizations and credentialing bodies relevant to mental health counseling.

  • MCC 516 DSM Diagnosis for Children, Adolescents and Adults

    The taxonomy and nosology of psychopathology will be reviewed using the structure of the current edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM); examining the disorders of infancy, childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Normal, developmental, stress induced, and pathological states will be explored. The emphasis will be placed upon the process of differential diagnosis for the purposes of case formulation, treatment planning, and/or referral along the continuum of care using the multiaxial model. Prerequisite: Foundation Courses.

  • MCC 520 Human Development Throughout the Lifespan

    This course surveys theories, scholarship, and research on human development throughout the lifespan. Students examine biological, neurological, cognitive, emotional, and social-cultural factors influencing individual development within a multicultural framework. The reciprocal influences of crises; transitions; normal and abnormal development; psychopathology; and familial and community relationships are addressed. Particular attention on the application of these concepts to the work of professional counselors is explored.

  • MCC 521 Human Growth and Development

    This course provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the nature and needs of persons at all the developmental levels and in multicultural contexts. Individual and family developmental theories and transitions, as well as theories of learning and personality development, including knowledge about neurobiological behavior will be emphasized. Knowledge about human behavior as it relates to developmental crises, trauma causing events, psychopathology, disability, and other factors that influence normal and abnormal behavior will be presented. Theories and etiology of addictions, knowledge about assisting optimal development and wellness, and resilience across the life span will be explored. A framework for understanding and developing interventions for extraordinary capabilities will be introduced.

  • MCC 524 Group Process and Facilitation

    This course is an experiential study of group dynamics, processes, and application within a legal and ethical framework. Group stages, tasks and skills of group members and leaders, and the importance of developing an understanding of the therapeutic value of group, are covered. This course involves role-played participation in a group designed to closely resemble a real-life group experience as leaders and group members. Prerequisite: Foundation Courses

  • MCC 528 Applied Counseling Theory

    This course focuses on learning to integrate insights and principles from counseling theories to clinical applications commonly encountered in human services roles. Content includes major traditional counseling theories, including psychoanalytic, cognitive/behavioral, humanistic/ existential, and family systems. Contemporary approaches include Dialectical Behavior Therapy, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, and Functional Analytic Psychotherapy. Students learn to evaluate selected research that supports and enhances the validity and application of each theory, and they gain insights into how to apply each theory in a manner appropriate to the complexity of problems presented by clients. Multi- and cross-cultural implications and adaptations are addressed, as well as ethical and risk assessment methods.

  • MCC 530 Ethical, Legal and Professional Issues in the Practice of Counseling

    This course addresses ethical, legal, and professional issues commonly associated with the practice of professional counseling consistent with Council on Accreditation for Counselor and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) standards and the American Counseling Association’s (ACA) Code of Ethics. National, regional, state licensure, and credentialing issues are addressed. This course identifies the systematic processes of identifying, implementing, and resolving ethical dilemmas mindful of various stakeholder concerns, including acting in the best interests of the client. The course explores personal and professional value systems, standards of practice, and legal issues in terms of how they impact decision-making processes and professional behavior.

  • MCC 531 Assessment

    Introduces the development of standardized and non-standardized assessment, including behavioral observation, clinical interviewing, and a variety of referenced instrumentation. Students will learn the basics of statistics applied to testing and measurement theory and applications. Special attention will be given to issues of validity and reliability, paying special attention to concerns regarding ethics and applications to multicultural populations. Learning will focus on the use and interpretation of common assessment methods. Prerequisite: Foundation Courses.

  • MCC 536 Medical and Psychosocial Aspects of Alcohol/Drug Use

    This course addresses the physiological, psychological, and sociological impact of alcohol/drug use, abuse and dependence including signs, symptoms, and behavior patterns. The basic classifications and pharmalogical action of drugs on human body systems will be covered as well as the etiological, behavioral, cultural, and demographic aspects and belief systems associated with alcohol/drug use. Prerequisite: Foundation, Framework, and Professional Practice Courses.

  • MCC 538 Social and Cultural Diversity

    This course addresses cultural, social, religious, and economic factors applicable to cultural, ethnic, and minority populations; both from the perspective of the culturally diverse client, and the counselor. Experiential methods of learning will be emphasized, including the development of self-awareness in the counselor. Traditional counseling theories, as well as more recent approaches to counseling diverse groups, will be analyzed for ethical and practical implications. The counselor’s role in addressing advocacy and justice will be explored. Prerequisite for MSCC: Foundation Courses. Prerequisite for MSCC & MSFYS: Foundation Courses

  • MCC 540 Assessment

    This course explores the history, development, and effective use of various types of assessment tools for evaluation and diagnosis purposes within a variety of professional counseling settings and applications. Students explore the ethical use and interpretation of standardized and non-standardized assessment tools including conducting behavioral observations, clinical interviewing, mental status examinations, symptom inventories, suicidal assessments, and personality assessments. Students further examine various factors influencing the use of assessment tools with multicultural and diverse populations. Prerequisite: MCC 501, MCC 502, MCC 504, and MCC 520.

  • MCC 546 Family Therapy

    The goal of this course is to help students comprehend the theoretical concepts and intervention techniques in the field of family therapy. Patterns of developmental and societal changes that impact families will also be studied, including addictions and trauma-causing events. Theories and models of couple and family resilience, as well as optimal development and wellness over the family life span will be introduced. Knowledge of a systems perspective which will provide an understanding of family and other systems theories and models of family and related interventions will be emphasized. Prerequisite: Foundation Courses.

  • MCC 549 Applied Neuroscience and Psychopharmacology

    This overview and introduction to the role and function of the Central Nervous System in psychopathology, and its pharmaceutical treatment, will prepare the mental health professional to both have a basic understanding of psychopharmacology, and to work with prescribing physicians to maximize the effectiveness of medication, and to quickly detect adverse effects. Prerequisite: Foundation, Framework, and Professional Practice Courses.

  • MCC 550 Theories of Psychopathology

    This course will explore evidence-based conceptualizations of both normal and disordered mental states, together with an examination of the etiology, development, manifestation, and potential treatment of mental disorders in infants, children, adolescents, and adults. Prerequisite: MCC 540.

  • MCC 560 Internship Fieldwork

    This internship course is designed for the Master of Arts in Human Services 36-credit hour program (or for students from previous catalogs in the 36-credit MS programs). Students apply their knowledge in a supervised human services context. The supervisor for the 300 clock hours required need not be licensed or certified; however, the supervisor must have appropriate professional skills and be approved by the University. The setting need not involve a comprehensive service program or a clinical practice setting.

  • MCC 585 Career Development

    This course introduces students to the theories of career development as well as the assessment tools and counselor practices associated with helping clients achieve congruence in their career development pattern. Students will explore interrelationships between factors such as age, gender, family, life roles, and multicultural issues as they relate to career and educational planning. Prerequisite: Foundation and Framework Courses.

  • MCC 600 Diagnosis of Mental and Behavioral Disorders

    The taxonomy and nosology of psychopathology will be reviewed using the structure and guidelines of the current editions of both the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) and the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) Manual. This course examines the disorders of infancy, childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Emphasis will be placed upon differential diagnosis for the purposes of case formulation and treatment planning. Prerequisite: All Foundation Courses

  • MCC 610 Group Processes and Facilitation

    This course is an experiential study of group dynamics, processes, and application within a legal and ethical framework. Group stages, tasks and skills of group members and leaders, and the importance of developing an understanding of the therapeutic value of group, are covered. This course involves role-played participation in a group designed to closely resemble a real-life group experience as leaders and group members. Prerequisite: All Foundation Courses

  • MCC 612 Counseling Practices and Psychotherapy

    Integration of the knowledge and skills needed for effective counseling including interviewing, clinical data gathering, diagnosis, treatment planning, treatment delivery, and clinical recording will be covered in this course. Self-awareness and self-assessment will be emphasized as a basis for professional growth and ethical practice. Knowledge and skills are directly applied to evidence-based counseling methods in the assessment, diagnosis and treatment of adult mental health disorders. Prerequisite: Foundation and Framework Courses

  • MCC 615 Clinical Internship

    The internship is an arranged, supervised opportunity for the student to perform all the activities that a regularly employed clinical mental health counselor would be expected to perform. The internship requires a minimum of 300 clock hours on site each semester with a minimum of 180 clock hours in direct service work. Direct service work includes: (a) individual counseling, (b) group counseling, (c) family counseling, (d) psycho-educational groups, and (e) consultation. Prerequisites: Foundation and Framework Courses with a grade of B or higher; students must provide proof of professional liability insurance.

  • MCC 620 Advanced Clinical Internship

    The internship is an arranged, supervised opportunity for the student to perform all the activities that a regularly employed clinical mental health counselor would be expected to perform. The internship requires a minimum of 300 clock hours on site each semester with a minimum of 180 clock hours in direct service work. Direct service work includes: (a) individual counseling, (b) group counseling, (c) family counseling, (d) psycho-educational groups, and (e) consultation. Prerequisites: MCC 615 with a grade of B or higher; students must provide proof of professional liability insurance; and permission of instructor required.

  • MCC 625 Advanced Clinical Mental Health Internship

    The internship is an arranged, supervised opportunity for the student to perform all the activities that a regularly employed clinical mental health counselor would be expected to perform. The internship requires a minimum of 300 clock hours on site each semester with a minimum of 180 clock hours in direct service work. Direct service work includes: (a) individual counseling, (b) group counseling, (c) family counseling, (d) psycho-educational groups, and (e) consultation. Prerequisites: MCC 620 with a grade of B or higher; students must provide proof of professional liability insurance; and permission of instructor required.

  • MCC 628 Sustainable Funding

    Ensuring sustainable funding is necessary for successful non-profit/human service (NP/HS) organizations will be the focus of this course. This course presents a number of ways to ensure funding from public and private sources. Areas of emphasis include researching public policy, industry trends; grant writing incorporating legal and ethical considerations.

  • MCC 630 Treatment of Child and Adolescent Disorders

    Treatment methods for children and adolescents, both historical and those that are well established and/or based upon evidentiary support are reviewed. The applications of specific techniques are examined with respect to specific diagnoses, and practice in their application is provided. Included are cognitive-behavioral therapy, behavior modification, token economy programs, habit reversal and control, parent training programs, and play therapy. The pros and cons of “manualized treatment” for children and adolescents will be examined, as will be concerns regarding ethics and multicultural issues with respect to children and adolescents. Prerequisite: Foundation, Framework and Professional Practice Courses.

  • MCC 635 Non-Profit Administration

    This course introduces non-profit administrative theories, principles, and required knowledge and skills. The course includes research and analysis of financial, human resources and project management constructs in non-profit/human services (NP/HS) administration. Compliance with federal, state and local regulations is incorporated.

  • MCC 638 Social and Cultural Diversity

    This course explores how cultural factors, such as race, ethnicity, gender, sex, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, religion, and disability status, shape, inform, and impact minority populations, marginalized populations, diverse groups, and dominant culture. Experiential methods of learning will be emphasized, including the development of self-awareness in the counselor, along with an appreciation for the experiences of others from different backgrounds and experiences. Traditional counseling theories, as well as more recent approaches to counseling diverse groups, will be analyzed for ethical and practical implications including their integration into assessment, diagnosis, and treatment issues. The counselor’s role in addressing advocacy and justice will be explored including issues of power and privilege. Prerequisite: All Foundation Courses

  • MCC 640 Medical and Psychosocial Aspects of Alcohol/Drug Use

    This course addresses the physiological, psychological, and sociological impact of alcohol/drug use, abuse and dependence including signs, symptoms, and behavior patterns. The basic classifications and pharmacological action of drugs on human body systems will be covered as well as the etiological, behavioral, cultural, and demographic aspects and belief systems associated with alcohol/drug use. Prerequisite: All Foundation Courses

  • MCC 645 Career Development

    This course introduces students to the theories of career development as well as the assessment tools and counselor practices associated with helping clients achieve congruence in their career development pattern. Students will explore interrelationships between factors such as age, gender, family, life roles, and multicultural issues as they relate to career and educational planning. Prerequisite: All Foundation Courses

  • MCC 650 Couples and Family Counseling

    This course introduces students to a broad range of theoretical approaches and interventions in the field of couples and family counseling with an emphasis on the systemic and relational components commonly associated in working with couples and families. The impact of societal changes, trauma, and mental health disorders on the family system will be studied. Theories and models of couple and family resilience as well as the promotion of wellness over the family life span will be introduced. Knowledge of how to effectively counsel couples and families, including problem identification, treatment planning, intervention, family wellness education, and relapse prevention will be emphasized. Prerequisite: All Foundation Courses

  • MCC 661 Applied Neuroscience and Psychopharmacology

    This overview and introduction to the role and function of the central nervous system in psychopathology, and its pharmaceutical treatment, will prepare the mental health professional to both have a basic understanding of psychopharmacology, and to work with prescribing physicians to maximize the effectiveness of medication, and to quickly detect adverse effects. This course is one of three elective courses that can be used to meet clinical counseling degree requirements. Prerequisite: All Foundation Courses

  • MCC 662 Treatment of Child and Adolescent Disorders

    Treatment methods for children and adolescents, both historical and those that are well established and/or based upon evidentiary support are reviewed. The applications of specific techniques are examined with respect to specific diagnoses, and practice in their application is provided. Included are cognitive-behavioral therapy, behavior modification, token economy programs, habit reversal and control, parent training programs, and play therapy. The pros and cons of “manualized treatment” for children and adolescents will be examined, as will be concerns regarding ethics and multicultural issues with respect to children and adolescents. This course is one of three elective courses that can be used to meet clinical counseling degree requirements. Prerequisite: All Foundation Courses

  • MCC 663 Human Sexuality

    This course is designed for counseling and human service professionals whose work will bring them into contact with clients experiencing problems and concerns with their sexuality. Information about human sexuality across the lifespan will be included. The course is designed to develop: a) students’ knowledge base related to human sexuality, b) an understanding of the varied sexuality issues which may be encountered in professional counseling practice, c) students’ skills in assessment and intervention techniques with sexuality issues, and d) increased awareness of one’s personal perceptions, attitudes and affect related to sexuality issues. Course participants will become more effective in identifying, assessing and intervening with human sexuality related clinical counseling issues. Prerequisite: All Foundation Courses

  • MCC 670 Advanced Counseling Skills, Techniques, and Practices

    This course builds upon foundational and advanced coursework reinforcing the applied aspect of counseling skills, techniques, and evidenced-based intervention. Topics include case conceptualization, assessment, diagnosis, treatment planning, termination, and documentation. Students examine and discern how personal counselor characteristics, belief systems, bias, and attitudes influence the overall therapeutic process; and, students discuss effective strategies for monitoring and managing these issues. Students demonstrate the successful use of counseling skills and techniques appropriate for varying client issues, needs, and situations. Prerequisite: All Foundation Courses, MCC 600, MCC 638, and MCC 640.

  • MCC 691 Clinical Internship I

    The internship is an arranged, supervised opportunity for the student to perform all the activities that a regularly employed clinical mental health counselor would be expected to perform. The internship requires a minimum of 300 clock hours on site each semester with a minimum of 180 clock hours in direct service work. Direct service work includes: (a) individual counseling, (b) group counseling, (c) family counseling, (d) psycho-educational groups, and (e) consultation. Prerequisites: Foundation Courses with a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher; students must provide proof of professional liability insurance. Director of Internship approval, or their designee, is required before being enrolled in this course. Prerequisite: All Foundation Courses, Program Director approval, and a 3.0 GPA.

  • MCC 692 Clinical Internship II

    The internship is an arranged, supervised opportunity for the student to perform all the activities that a regularly employed clinical mental health counselor would be expected to perform. The internship requires a minimum of 300 clock hours on site each semester with a minimum of 180 clock hours in direct service work. Direct service work includes: (a) individual counseling, (b) group counseling, (c) family counseling, (d) psycho-educational groups, and (e) consultation. Prerequisites: Foundation Courses with a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher; students must provide proof of professional liability insurance. Director of Internship approval, or their designee, is required before being enrolled in this course. Prerequisite: All Foundation Courses, Program Director approval, and a 3.0 GPA.

  • MCC 693 Clinical Internship III

    The internship is an arranged, supervised opportunity for the student to perform all the activities that a regularly employed clinical mental health counselor would be expected to perform. The internship requires a minimum of 300 clock hours on site each semester with a minimum of 180 clock hours in direct service work. Direct service work includes: (a) individual counseling, (b) group counseling, (c) family counseling, (d) psycho-educational groups, and (e) consultation. Prerequisites: Foundation Courses with a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher; students must provide proof of professional liability insurance. Director of Internship approval, or their designee, is required before being enrolled in this course. Prerequisite: All Foundation Courses, Program Director approval, and a 3.0 GPA.

  • MCL 650 Ethical and Professional Principles of Executive Coaching

    This course covers the ethical guidelines for professional coaches and professional practice standards. Topics covered include record keeping, dual relationships, and the current professional context and dynamics of the coaching field. Requirement - Must be taken concurrently with 1 credit hour of either MCL 654, 655, or 656.

  • MCL 651 Executive Coaching Communication Skills and Assessment

    This course addresses the academic theories upon which executive coaching is founded. These include the coaching relationship process and associated communication skills. It will also cover various assessment tools utilized in executive coaching. Requirement - Must be taken concurrently with 1 credit hour of either MCL 654, 655, or 656.

  • MCL 652 The Role and Relationship Dynamics of Executive Coaching

    This course will cover the role of executive coaches, as well as coaching relationship dynamics. A general model of executive coaching will be introduced and utilized throughout the course. Requirement - Must be taken concurrently with 1 credit hour of either MCL 654, 655, or 656.

  • MCL 653 Executive Coaching Internship

    This course provides an opportunity for students to expand their learning by gaining experience in the actual workplace. The learning objectives and specific program of study must be developed in consultation with and approved by the course instructor and the site supervisor of the intern prior to the start of the internship. Requirement - One credit hour must be taken concurrently with each of MCL 650, 651 and 652.
    Course Syllabus

  • MCL 654 Executive Coaching Internship Performance

    This course provides an opportunity for students to expand their learning by gaining guided executive coaching performance development in the actual workplace. The learning performance objectives and specific program of study must be developed in consultation with and approved by the course instructor and the site supervisor of the intern prior to the start of the internship. Requirement – One credit hour must be taken concurrently with one of these three courses: MCL 650, 651 and 652.

  • MCL 655 Executive Coaching Internship Skills

    This course provides an opportunity for students to expand their learning by gaining executive coaching skill development experience in the actual workplace. The learning skills objectives and specific program of study must be developed in consultation with and approved by the course instructor and the site supervisor of the intern prior to the start of the internship. Requirement – One credit hour must be taken concurrently with one of these three courses: MCL 650, 651 and 652. Prerequisite: MCL 654.

  • MCL 656 Executive Coaching Internship Competencies

    This course provides an opportunity for students to expand their learning by gaining guided executive coaching competency development experience in the actual workplace. The learning competencies objectives and specific program of study must be developed in consultation with and approved by the course instructor and the site supervisor of the intern prior to the start of the internship. Requirement – One credit hour must be taken concurrently with one of these three courses: MCL 650, 651 and 652.* Prerequisite: MCL 654 and MCL 655.

  • MFA 511 Art and Value Creation

    This course presents an investigation of artistic ideas pertaining to value creation. Topic areas include: artistic development, creativity and the creative process; economic value creation; systematic thinking related to small enterprise models and legal structures; and development of creative artistic projects through individualized planning. Note: Artistic Development Plans will be refined between students and mentors in each subsequent course of the program.

  • MFA 512 Art Market Awareness and Creative Planning

    This course offers development of tools to understand the dynamics between arts, sciences, and market expressions and related application of creativity. Topic areas include: myths associated with creativity; divergent thinking; entrepreneurial ventures and artistic creations; and identifying markets, structure, demand, and sustainability. Prerequisite: MFA 511

  • MFA 521 Art, Creativity, and Small Enterprise Basics

    This course covers basic enterprise structures and strategies creatively applied to artistic endeavors. Some topic areas include: market planning using creative techniques; arts sponsorships and creative financing; value of creative collaboration; accounting basics and business structures; and synthesizing aspects of creativity and market savvy to create a foundation for blending arts and enhancing artistic value chain market success. Prerequisites: MFA 511 and MFA 512

  • MFA 522 Art Refinement, Entrepreneurial Planning, and Markets

    This course focuses on marketplace basics and planning within the context of entrepreneurial behaviors and arts concepts. Topic areas include: creativity, innovation and inventions; dreaming and creativity; connections between art expressions and intellectual property rights; the art of practice; multiple expressions of primary and secondary art forms; entrepreneurial behaviors; and deliberate ethics. Prerequisites: MFA 511, MFA 512, and MFA 521

  • MFA 581 Virtual Residency

    Virtual residencies span five days and are based on artistic problem solving within the context of an actual entrepreneurial endeavor. Every virtual residency will have a different entrepreneurial endeavor to resolve.

  • MFA 582 Virtual Residency

    Virtual residencies span five days and are based on artistic problem solving within the context of an actual entrepreneurial endeavor. Every virtual residency will have a different entrepreneurial endeavor to resolve.

  • MFA 583 Virtual Residency

    Virtual residencies span five days and are based on artistic problem solving within the context of an actual entrepreneurial endeavor. Every virtual residency will have a different entrepreneurial endeavor to resolve.

  • MFA 584 Virtual Residency

    Virtual residencies span five days and are based on artistic problem solving within the context of an actual entrepreneurial endeavor. Every virtual residency will have a different entrepreneurial endeavor to resolve.

  • MFA 591 On-Campus Residency

    Pre-assigned readings and videos prepare students for participation in on-campus residencies that span five days. Residencies include seminars, lectures, and panel discussions on a variety of topics relating to art, creativity, and entrepreneurship. Topics will vary with each residency and will also provide student with opportunities for networking.

  • MFA 592 On-Campus Residency

    Pre-assigned readings and videos prepare students for participation in on-campus residencies that span five days. Residencies include seminars, lectures, and panel discussions on a variety of topics relating to art, creativity, and entrepreneurship. Topics will vary with each residency and will also provide student with opportunities for networking.

  • MFA 593 On-Campus Residency

    Pre-assigned readings and videos prepare students for participation in on-campus residencies that span five days. Residencies include seminars, lectures, and panel discussions on a variety of topics relating to art, creativity, and entrepreneurship. Topics will vary with each residency and will also provide student with opportunities for networking.

  • MFA 594 On-Campus Residency

    Pre-assigned readings and videos prepare students for participation in on-campus residencies that span five days. Residencies include seminars, lectures, and panel discussions on a variety of topics relating to art, creativity, and entrepreneurship. Topics will vary with each residency and will also provide student with opportunities for networking.

  • MFA 611 Art, Creativity, and Technology

    This course covers creative integration of elements of technology to reflect target markets and aid sustainability, growth, and the art itself. Topic areas include: technology as a means to promote enterprise growth and showcase artistic products; art, new media and entrepreneurial planning using creative problem solving; perceptions of success and failure; risk assessment in the marketplace and artistic design. Prerequisites: MFA 511, MFA 512, and MFA 521, and MFA 522

  • MFA 612 The Art of Empathy, Networking, and Securing Value

    This course covers the inter-relationship of markets, people, planet, and art in relationship to assessing value. Topic areas include: art management utilizing technology; creative use of technology; integrate new media and new art; creativity in a structured environment; value of enterprise and portfolios; creativity in the context of leadership, culture and productivity; strategic and exit planning. Prerequisite: MFA 511, MFA 512, MFA 521, MFA 522, and MFA 611

  • MFA 621 Multiple Perspectives of Art, Enterprise Strategy, and Self-Reflection

    This course encompasses creative thinking applied to enterprise strategies, art, and self-reflection. Topics include: connections between art, expressions, and intellectual property rights; creativity and strategic planning; emerging creative class; creation and delivery of an enterprise pitch; entrepreneurial behaviors; enterprise scale structures; deliberate ethics; and applying pedagogy to teaching creativity, art, and value creation to others. Prerequisites: MFA 511, MFA 512, MFA 521, MFA 522, MFA 611, and MFA 612.

  • MFA 622 Thesis, Project Completion, and Presentation

    This course includes completion of a thesis based on research that is applied to a final artistic project. A mentor team and the program director must approve the draft and presentation. Specific requirements listed within the course syllabus. Prerequisites: MFA 511, MFA 512, MFA 521, MFA 522, MFA 611, MFA 612, and MFA 621

  • MGTC 309 Managerial Communications

    This course helps students create a foundation of knowledge and skills related to the types of managerial communication activities that managers are likely to face in a business environment. The course work focuses primarily on practicing written analysis, evaluation, and explanation of information in different formats including developing formal presentations. Students will have multiple opportunities to learn how to appropriately accept and apply feedback to improve their communication skills. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.
    Course Syllabus

  • MGTC 319 Decision Making in the Business Environment

    In this course, students learn how managers apply various critical-thinking processes to make effective business decisions in order to positively impact organizational goals, including, but not limited to, ensuring the financial viability of the enterprise. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.
    Course Syllabus

  • MGTC 329 Fiscal Management

    In this course, students learn how managers obtain and utilize financial data to make sound business decisions. Students are introduced to basic accounting terminology and practices, as well as learn about the types of business information systems used to produce and analyze financial information. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.
    Course Syllabus

  • MGTC 413 Management Skills

    This course provides an overview of the theory and practice of management. Management is presented as a discipline as well as a process, covering the basic functions of planning, organizing, delegating, and leading. Also addressed are building employee empowerment and change management strategies. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the College of Business’ Bachelor of Science in Management accelerated degree program and the successful completion of RCBC 310, RCBC 320, RCBC 330, and RCBC 340
    Course Syllabus

  • MGTC 423 Organizational Behavior

    This course provides a global perspective of organizational behavior. This course examines the managerial role to include creating, maintaining and changing organizational culture; decision making, power and influence, coaching, empowerment, and performance appraisals. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the College of Business’ Bachelor of Science in Management accelerated degree completion program and successful completion of RCBC 310, RCBC 320, RCBC 330, and RCBC 340
    Course Syllabus

  • MGTC 426 Global Management

    This course provides students with an understanding of global management theories and practices in relation to strategic business activities and topics, such as economic theory, marketing, developing teams, and effective communication. Students learn about the roles the manager plays in strategic business activities. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.
    Course Syllabus

  • MGTC 433 Economics for Capitalism

    This course focuses on both macroeconomic and microeconomic theories and terminology. The subject matter focuses primarily on U.S. economic issues with a discussion of how information is applied to business transactions. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the College of Business’ Bachelor of Science in Management accelerated degree program and successful completion of RCBC 310, RCBC 320, RCBC 330, and RCBC 340
    Course Syllabus

  • MGTC 436 Management Skills

    This course provides students with an overview of managerial theories and practices. Management is presented as a discipline, as well as a process that includes basic job functions including: planning, organizing, and delegating. Students also learn about leading by facilitating individual employee development through empowerment, coaching, and performance appraisals. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.
    Course Syllabus

  • MGTC 443 Strategic Management

    This course focuses on effective application of strategic planning through case studies to better understand similarities and differences in companies across industries. It also provided an analysis of businesses to translate the concept of strategic management into global sustainability. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the College of Business’ Bachelor of Science in Management accelerated degree program and successful completion of RCBC 310, RCBC 320, RCBC 330, RCBC 340, MGTC 413, MGTC 423, and MGTC 433
    Course Syllabus

  • MGTC 446 Organizational Behavior

    In this course, the learning focus is on the manager's roles related to creating, maintaining, and modifying the organization's culture through appropriate use of power and influence, effective decision making, and actively and consistently engaging employees. Students also analyze the factors that facilitate the success or failure of organizational change. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.
    Course Syllabus

  • MGTC 456 Economic Capitalism

    This course focuses on both macroeconomic and microeconomic theories and terminology. The subject matter focuses primarily on U.S. economic issues with a discussion of how information is applied to business transactions. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.
    Course Syllabus

  • MGTC 466 Ethical Management

    This course introduces students to the principles and practices of ethical behaviors at individual, organizational, and social levels. Students study the effects of ethical and unethical behaviors and decisions on organizational success. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.
    Course Syllabus

  • MGTC 476 Management Capstone

    The management capstone is an opportunity for the student to showcase knowledge and/or skills that were obtained and/or developed during the MGTC program. Students are able to opt to complete a capstone project or a formal paper focusing on one or more of the following with the instructor's permission: 1) Further study of a topic of interest that was presented in any of the courses in the MGTC program, 2) Study of a topic related to management that was not covered in the MGTC program, or 3) a practical application of knowledge and skills gained in the MGTC program related to the students' employment or career goals. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.
    Course Syllabus

  • MHA 602 Health Information Technology and Administration

    This course examines the integration and application of health information technology (HIT) for improved organizational and patient outcomes. The course focuses on current changes for State and Federal mandates for HIT, leadership and administration of HIT, as well as specific HIT applications for individual healthcare organizations and patient care modalities.
    Course Syllabus

  • MHA 606 Applied Data Management

    This course examines descriptive and inferential statistical methods used for practical applications in healthcare administration. The course presents a variety of statistical methods, along with their intended applications, and introduces the use of metrics for process improvement and evidence-based decision making.
    Course Syllabus

  • MHA 611 Research Methods for Healthcare Administrators

    Healthcare administrators are frequently required to evaluate and apply evidence-based research on various healthcare topics. The purpose of this course is two-fold. First, it introduces the principles of healthcare administration and evidence-based research. Second, it provides the context in which to apply this knowledge through the development of a research project proposal. This proposal may or may not be carried out in MHA 691 Capstone Project.
    Course Syllabus

  • MHA 624 Legal, Ethical, and Compliance Issues

    This course examines the multitude of laws, legal entities and compliance issues associated with administration within healthcare organizations. The complexity of ethical issues, both administrative and biomedical, is discussed in various applied medical settings.

  • MHA 626 Organizational Design and Delivery Systems

    This course provides students with a foundational view of healthcare delivery systems in the United States. Students discuss the formal structure of healthcare organizations and how costs, access and quality impact the delivery of care. Emphasis is placed on healthcare as a system of care delivery.

  • MHA 631 Quality Management

    A general systems perspective and introduction to the administrative skills necessary to integrate quality management strategies are explored in this course. The course examines best-practice research and practical methods for assisting organizations with responding to healthcare quality challenges.

  • MHA 648 Leadership and Team Development in Healthcare

    The critical role that leaders face in dynamic and complex healthcare organizations is a focus in this course. The knowledge, skills and behaviors that are critical to effectively leading positive outcomes for healthcare organizations are explored. In this course, the development of multidisciplinary teams within the healthcare environment is examined.
    Course Syllabus

  • MHA 661 Healthcare Finance

    An introduction to healthcare finance, including management control processes, financial statement analysis, ratio analysis, variance analysis, and capital structure is the focus of this course. A foundational background of the economics of today's healthcare environment is examined.
    Course Syllabus

  • MHA 671 Operations Management

    This foundational course is about finding the best processes and systems for the management of complex healthcare organizations. Operational planning issues include process design, systems theory, project management, facilities and supply-chain management, and health information systems throughout multi-level administrative positions.
    Course Syllabus

  • MHA 673 Strategic Management for Healthcare Organizations

    The application of strategic management principles for leading healthcare organizations is the focus of this course. Emphasis is placed on aligning resources with strategic organizational outcomes. Students will conduct an internal and external analysis of their healthcare organization in order to make recommendations regarding its competitive position and opportunity for improved performance.
    Course Syllabus

  • MHA 676 Human Resource Management

    An overview of human resource management practices in healthcare organizations are provided in this course. The course examines how changing work force demographics, work design, emerging technologies, and employment law and regulations impact the role of healthcare administrators.

  • MHA 691 Capstone Project

    This is the culminating experience of the MHA program. The capstone project provides students with an opportunity to demonstrate application of learning to a practical, real-life issue within their respective healthcare organizations. Capstone projects will consist of a project proposal, implementation and review of results. Final capstone project presentations will be evaluated by the faculty member and representative(s) from the organization. Prerequisite: Completion of 27 hours in the MHA program and MHA 611. (the grading structure for MHA 691 will be a Pass/No Pass)
    Course Syllabus

  • MHI 604 Introduction to Innovation

    This course explores the role of innovation in the healthcare related setting. It addresses the required skills and abilities to influence and challenge the status quo within healthcare and to offer creative, compelling vision for other alternative solutions. Students will examine the types of intelligence, leadership styles, and characteristics of innovative thought leaders. It will also examine the individual development of innovators assessing their ability to take risk, influence others and ability to advance innovation in a healthcare setting.

  • MHI 606 Applied Data Management

    This course examines descriptive and inferential statistical methods used for practical applications in healthcare. The course presents a variety of statistical methods, along with their intended applications, and introduces students to using metrics for process improvement and evidence-based decision making.

  • MHI 610 Systems Thinking and Innovation

    This course will focus on systems thinking and the innovative process. This course will examine the current American healthcare system at the local, state and federal levels. Current healthcare issues and care delivery systems will be discussed. Students will discuss the role of complexity science and systems theory as it relates to healthcare systems and develop skills in systems assessment, health care system design interventions, and managing system innovation. Prerequisite: MHI 604

  • MHI 614 Evidenced Based Practices and Decision Making

    This course will develop students understanding of evidence based practice and using EBP to develop quality healthcare services through innovative strategies. Students will examine the relationship between innovation and evidence based practices. This course will examine the role of innovation leadership and the how to use current evidence to support innovative practices within healthcare. Prerequisite: MHI 604

  • MHI 628 Advanced Principles and Concepts in Innovation

    This course will advance students understanding of system theory in the healthcare setting and examine essential elements of applying innovation, implementation of innovation, managing challenges, overcoming obstacles and facilitating successful innovation initiatives in the healthcare setting.

  • MHI 632 Financing for Healthcare Innovation

    This course will explore financial resources for innovation, future and anticipated financial aspects of innovation, financial constructs to support innovation sustainability as well as developing models for financing. Cost effectiveness, return on investment, stewardship, and organizational and community benefit will be explored. Prerequisite: MHI 604

  • MHI 640 Healthcare Policy and Innovation

    This course will explore the role of innovation and healthcare policy, activism and healthcare reform. Examination of state, local and national healthcare policy issues specific to research and innovation will be addressed. Students will identify barriers and opposition to innovation as well as agencies in support of healthcare innovative strategies. Students will develop skills in developing healthcare reform initiatives to advance innovation. Prerequisite: MHI 604

  • MHI 646 Interdisciplinary Collaboration and Innovation

    This course will assist students in working in interdisciplinary teams and group to develop innovative interventions and initiatives within the healthcare setting. It will discuss essential functions of effective, collaborative teams. Prerequisite: MHI 604

  • MHI 672 Communication and Innovation

    This course will assist student in developing key skills and abilities that are required in communicating in the role of innovator. Active skills in mediating, negotiating, authentic dialogue techniques will be discussed and explored. Prerequisite: MHI 604

  • MHI 678 Healthcare Entrepreneurship

    This course will examine the entrepreneur and “intrepreneurs” roles available as healthcare innovators. This course will analyze entrepreneur constructs, methods for developing new technology, start -up organization or new products and services within a healthcare organization. Prerequisite: MHI 604, MHA 606, MHI 632

  • MHI 684 Outcomes, Results and Measurement

    This course will identify, examine, analyze and measure infrastructures, processes and outcomes specific to the work of innovation. Prerequisite: MHI 604, MHA 606, MHA 628

  • MHI 692 Capstone Innovation Project

    This course applies the constructs learned in the MHI program and presents evidence of key principles, application, implementation and evaluation of an innovation project in a healthcare organization. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all MHI courses.

  • MHRC 309 Foundation of Business Communication

    This course focuses on the practical application of business communication. Emphasis will be placed on learning the different types of writing required in the modern business environment including an introduction to professional presentations. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.
    Course Syllabus

  • MHRC 319 Fundamentals of Human Resource Management

    This course addresses the critical concepts related to human capital management and human resource management administration. Concepts addressed include, but are not limited to: (a) overview of Human Resource functions, (b) influence of the legal/economic conditions on human resource functions, (c) decision making, and (d) strategy Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.
    Course Syllabus

  • MHRC 329 Recruitment, Selection and Placement of Human Resources

    This course addresses critical issues in the selection and placement of human resources. Concepts addressed include, but are not limited to: (a) legal and regulatory factors affecting selection and placement of human resources, (b) recruiting practices, selection practices, (c) job analysis and related processes, (d) impact of various economic conditions on recruitment efforts, (e) evaluation. Current topics will also be addressed, such as the changing nature of recruiting practices. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.
    Course Syllabus

  • MHRC 413 Fundamentals of Human Resource Management

    This course addresses the critical concepts related to human capital management and human resource management administration. Concepts addressed include, but are not limited to: (a) influence of the law on personnel functions, (b) law and the personnel function in the new millennium, and (c) job analysis, job description, job specifications, and job evaluation. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the College of Business’ Bachelor of Science in Management of Human Resources accelerated degree program and successful completion of RCBC 310, RCBC 320, RCBC 330, and RCBC 340
    Course Syllabus

  • MHRC 423 Recruitment, Selection, and Placement of Human Resources

    This course addresses critical issues in the selection and placement of human resources. Concepts addressed include, but are not limited to: (a) legal and regulatory factors affecting selection and placement of human resources, (b) recruiting practices, selection practices, (c) interviewing skills, and (d) equal employment opportunity/affirmative action practices. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the College of Business’ Bachelor of Science in Management of Human Resources accelerated degree program and successful completion of RCBC 310, RCBC 320, RCBC 330, and RCBC 340
    Course Syllabus

  • MHRC 426 Training and Development of Human Resources

    This course looks at training and development as avenues to strategic competitive advantage. Concepts addressed include, but are not limited to: (a) legal and regulatory factors affecting training, (b) training needs analysis, (c) budgets, and (d) evaluation of training and development programs. Current topics will also be addressed, such as the growing utilization of various types of e-training programs and economic considerations. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.
    Course Syllabus

  • MHRC 433 Training, Development and Employee Relations

    This course addresses human capital management from a training and development perspective and also from a performance management perspective. These functions are explored and analyzed from a strategic/competitive advantage stand point. Concepts addressed include, but are not limited to: a) legal and regulatory factors affecting training, employee rights and discipline, b) training needs analysis, c) training and development practices and evaluation and performance management, and d) labor relations and discipline/terminations. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the College of Business’ Bachelor of Science in Management of Human Resources accelerated degree program and successful completion of RCBC 310, RCBC 320, RCBC 330, and RCBC 340
    Course Syllabus

  • MHRC 436 Employee and Labor Relations

    This course addresses critical concepts involved with employee and labor relations. Concepts addressed include, but are not limited to: (a) legal and regulatory factors affecting employee rights, discipline, and performance management, (b) legal and regulatory factors affecting labor relations, unfair labor practices, and collective bargaining practices. Current topics will also be addressed, such as the economy and political climates in relation to unionization and overall workforce management. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.
    Course Syllabus

  • MHRC 443 Compensation and Benefit Administration

    This course addresses critical concepts involved with development and administration of compensation and benefits of human capital within organizations. Concepts addressed include, but are not limited to: a) legal and regulatory factors affecting compensation and benefit plans, b) types, characteristics, and advantages of compensation and benefit strategies, c) the strategic nature of compensation and benefit strategies, and d) the interconnectivity between compensation and benefit initiatives and performance management. Knowledge from this course as well as from prior courses will be applied to final activities for individual development portfolios. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the College of Business’ Bachelor of Science in Management of Human Resources accelerated degree program and successful completion of RCBC 310, RCBC 320, RCBC 330, RCBC 340, MHRC 413, MHRC 423, and MHRC 433
    Course Syllabus

  • MHRC 446 Compensation Administration

    This course addresses critical concepts involved with development and administration of compensation. Concepts addressed include, but are not limited to: a) legal and regulatory factors affecting compensation plans strategies, b) types, characteristics, and advantages of compensation strategies, c) the strategic nature of compensation strategies, and d) performance management. Current topics will also be addressed, such as executive compensation, pay for performance and overall compensation practices relative to the changing nature of the economy. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.
    Course Syllabus

  • MHRC 456 Benefits Administration

    This course addresses critical concepts involved with development and administration of benefits. Concepts addressed include, but are not limited to: a) strategic nature of benefits, b) mandated vs. voluntary benefits, c) controlling benefit costs. Current topics will also be addressed, such as new healthcare legislation and strategies for managing benefit costs. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.
    Course Syllabus

  • MHRC 466 Business Operations and HR Strategy

    This course focuses on the practical application of various aspects of business operations from a Human Resource perspective. Concepts address, but are not limited to: (a) basic accounting and financial concepts, (b) business information systems/human resource information systems (HRIS), (c) global Human Resource Management and (d) strategic business decisions and partnerships. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.
    Course Syllabus

  • MHRC 476 Human Resource Management Capstone Project

    This course is designed to incorporate all aspects of Human Resource Management into a comprehensive project. In addition, students will conduct in-depth research of the Human Resource field as well as prepare material designed to aid them in their careers. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.
    Course Syllabus

  • MIDD 500 Introduction to Instructional Design and Development

    This course introduces students to the cognitive and experiential content of the MIDD program, which include key ideas, concepts, and writings in the field of instructional design.
    Course Syllabus

  • MIDD 510 Foundations of Active Learning

    Students examine the principles of active learning, including the usage of resources such as Bloom’s Taxonomy in contemporary curriculum.
    Course Syllabus

  • MIDD 520 Project Management

    Students construct a project management document through MS Project that outlines the tasks and timelines needed to complete MIDD 650. This document includes a Project Charter, work breakdown structures, project phases, and proper project planning tools and procedures. (1 credit hr)
    Course Syllabus

  • MIDD 530 Instructional Strategies for the Online Classroom

    Students assess the various methods of how people learn, and then formulate an appropriate process for transferring those methods to an online learning environment.
    Course Syllabus

  • MIDD 540 Developing Learning Products

    In this course, students integrate active learning applications such as games, simulations, cooperative student projects, and interactive case studies into practical curriculum.
    Course Syllabus

  • MIDD 550 Developing Digital Assets

    Students develop digital assets in the form of text, image, audio, and video files for usage in completing MIDD 650. Emphasis is placed on the importance of organizing and storing digital assets through a Digital Asset Management System. (1 credit hr)
    Course Syllabus

  • MIDD 600 Evaluating Online Technologies

    In this course, students investigate modern techniques in online teaching and learning pedagogy, while incorporating evaluative strategies specific to the online learning environment.
    Course Syllabus

  • MIDD 610 Best Practices for Online Facilitation

    Students combine interactive online learning elements, modern technologies, and student expectations with the multiple roles of a facilitator.
    Course Syllabus

  • MIDD 620 Developing Enhanced Programs

    Students design and integrate face-to-face or synchronous activities to augment an online course, thereby producing a blended learning experience. This course will be integrated into MIDD 650. (1 credit hr)
    Course Syllabus

  • MIDD 630 Assessment of Student Learning

    Students analyze the extent to which knowledge is learned and applied through curriculum design, while considering the importance that external stakeholders comprise in the academic assessment process.
    Course Syllabus

  • MIDD 640 Performance Support Systems

    Students evaluate the various systems used by their target audience in performing their daily work to identify opportunities for improvement in the systems or in their instructional designs.
    Course Syllabus

  • MIDD 650 Instructional Design and Development Final Project

    Students develop a project based on their prior work in MIDD 520, 550, and 620. The focus of the project is to allow students to investigate areas of personal and professional interest through a project of their own design as agreed upon with the instructor. (1 credit hr)
    Course Syllabus

  • MISC 303 Strategic Management

    Students will be introduced to the most current strategic management theories and practices. The course will cover world-class organizations, the guerrilla view of competitive advantage, online communities, data mining, real options theory, and several others. Students will analyze the concepts of strategic management such as competitive advantage, SWOT, corporate growth, and strategy implementation. The course will include several case studies that will allow the student to better evaluate the importance of how strategic management integrates in the technology industry.
    Course Syllabus

  • MISC 313 Business Communications and Research

    This course covers forms, styles and methods used in business communication. The course includes practice of oral communication and listening skills, as well as written correspondence. The course addresses project proposals and status updates, meeting dynamics, contract negotiations, communicating change, systems demonstrations, and the presentation of technical and quantitative information. This course will address the communications requirements in effective project management.
    Course Syllabus

  • MISC 323 Negotiating in Business

    Virtually everything in business is negotiated, and the ability to negotiate strong agreements and understandings is among today’s most valuable talents. The skill to negotiate effectively is essential in today’s give-and-take management environment. This course explains how to establish a solid pre-negotiation foundation, subtly guide the negotiation, and consistently set and achieve satisfactory targets. From transferring one’s existing strengths to the negotiating table to avoiding common negotiating errors, it reveals battle-proven steps for reaching personal and organizational objectives in every negotiation.
    Course Syllabus

  • MISC 334 Management of Information Systems

    This course provides an introduction to Management Information Systems (MIS) and examines the role of information systems in supporting a wide range of organizational functions. Capstone projects, which progress throughout the program, begin in this course with a project proposal and a scope definition.
    Course Syllabus

  • MISC 344 Budget and Finance Decisions in IT

    This course provides an exploration of the key elements of finance used by managers to support long and short-term decisions in business projects. Capstone projects will be evaluated for cost/benefit analysis adding net present value, return on investment and payback periods. This course will also evaluate projects for their profitability and cost/benefit factor.
    Course Syllabus

  • MISC 404 Information Security Management

    This course provides an introduction to information security. Coverage includes developing strategies to manage information security issues and protect an organization’s IT assets. Case studies will be used to explore various applications of information security.
    Course Syllabus

  • MISC 414 Project Management

    This course introduces project management plans using techniques based on the Project Management Body of Knowledge Guide (PMBOK® Guide). Topics include initiating, planning, executing, controlling and closing projects. Scenario based case studies will be utilized to emphasize course material. Capstone projects will continue to be updated to include Gantt charts, time schedules, work break down tasks, and resources identified.
    Course Syllabus

  • MISC 424 Managing Innovations in Information Systems

    This course provides an examination of the process of developing and implementing information systems plans both at the strategic and tactical levels. Topics include strategic issues, project management, alternative approaches for building systems, risk management, and emerging technologies in a global marketplace.
    Course Syllabus

  • MISC 434 Future Trends in MIS

    This course is designed to identify issues in current business markets that affect how Management Information Systems can blend technology with business and impact future directions of IS. Capstone projects are completed in this course.
    Course Syllabus

  • MJCM 500 Criminal Law

    This course will focus on the substantive criminal law. Students will examine crimes such as homicide, sex offenses, and theft. Students will use this course material to improve their baseline of knowledge of our criminal law statutes.

  • MJCM 510 Forensics

    This course will examine the fundamental forensic topics of fingerprints, bloodstain pattern analysis, forensic pathology, biological fluids and DNA, microanalysis of trace evidence, and firearm and tool mark examination. Additionally, this course will prepare students to evaluate crime scenes and how forensic science is utilized to assist in a criminal investigation.

  • MJCM 520 Criminal Behavior Analysis

    This course will cover the concepts of human behavior in a criminal context and examine prevailing criminological causation theories. Students will use this course material to analyze criminal behavior patterns and formulate hypotheses regarding deviant behavior and its association with criminality.

  • MJCM 530 Research Methods and Statistical Applications

    This course will examine the relationship between criminological research methods and contemporary theories of criminal behavior. Students will use this course material to manage quantitative data and utilize methods of analysis.

  • MJCM 540 Crime Analysis and Case Management

    This course will introduce students to the scientific study of crime analysis and criminal case management. Students will use this course material to identify and recognize criminological terminology and management methods, as well as methods and techniques of tactical, strategic, and administrative crime analysis.

  • MJCM 550 Advanced Crime Analysis

    This course will build on the elements learned in MJCM 540. Students will use this course material to examine systematic analytical processes regarding crime patterns and crime trend correlations, in addition to spatial analysis of crime problem within crime analysis.

  • MJCM 600 Planning, Budgeting, and Resource Management

    This course will examine the interactive management processes specific to law enforcement agencies. Students will use this course material to develop and create programmatic budgets, and apply financial management techniques to organizational planning initiatives.

  • MJCM 610 Organizational Analysis and Evaluation

    This course will cover the concepts of organizational behavior specific to law enforcement agencies. Students will use this course material to select and differentiate between decision-making processes as they relate to policy decisions.

  • MJCM 620 Communication, Leadership, and Management

    This course will concentrate on the structures and processes inherent within the leadership and management of criminal justice organizations. Students will use this course material to select the best means of managing labor relations, creating policy, and communicating effectively.

  • MJCM 630 Writing for the Criminal Justice Professional

    This course will improve the technical and cognitive writing skills needed for people in law enforcement. Specific attention will be given to editing skills, communication style, and the application of proper grammar in a legal context. Students will use this course material to incorporate computer technology into written correspondence and reports.

  • MJCM 640 Ethics and Decision Making

    This course will question the relationship between law and morality, especially with regard to individual responsibility. Students will use this course material to examine ethical issues applicable to criminal justice settings, and the corresponding role of Internal Affairs.

  • MJCM 650 Technology and Future Trends

    This course will focus on how technology has affected the operation of systems utilized in contemporary criminal justice settings, as well as the development of long-range forecasts for trends impacting law enforcement operations. Students will use this course material to select appropriate applications of communication systems, interfacing networks, agency training, and resource implementation.

  • MKMC 309 Business Communications

    This course focuses on the practical application of communication in organizations. Emphasis includes learning types of writing and presentations used in the professional environment. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.

  • MKMC 319 Environmental Analysis and Decision Making

    This course focuses on the knowledge needed to understand the environment and apply processes for making marketing and business decisions and utilizing critical thinking skills analysis. The role of capitalism as an economic factor receives emphasis. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.

  • MKMC 329 Marketing Management Principles, Strategies and Plans

    This course provides current and prospective marketing managers skills to develop strategic marketing plans to support an organizations’ mission and values. Emphasis is placed on the principles, strategies, and planning for effective marketing management and performance. Social media and other strategies contribute to development of these plans and approaches. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.

  • MKMC 421 Marketing Management Principles, Strategies, and Plans

    This course provides current and prospective marketing managers with marketing skills to develop strategic marketing plans to support an organizations’ mission and values. Emphasis is placed on the principles, strategies, and planning for effective marketing management and performance. Social media and other strategies are employed in the development of these plans and approaches. Prerequisite: Acceptance in the College of Business’ Bachelor of Science in Marketing Management accelerated degree completion program and successful completion of RCBC 310, RCBC 320, RCBC 330, and RCBC 340
    Course Syllabus

  • MKMC 423 Market Research and Consumer and Business Behavior

    This course focuses on the development and use of market research to forecast consumer and business buying habits and behavior. Particular attention is placed on changing market influences, such as digital marketing and social media, to forecast and shape consumer and business purchasing preferences. Prerequisite: Acceptance in the College of Business’ Bachelor of Science in Marketing Management accelerated degree completion program and successful completion of RCBC 310, RCBC 320, RCBC 330, and RCBC 340
    Course Syllabus

  • MKMC 426 Market Research

    This course focuses on market research, the principles and methods of research design, analysis, techniques, and development of research projects. There will also be emphasis on designing and implementing valid research instruments and processes. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.

  • MKMC 433 Advertising, Sales, and Distribution Channel Management

    This course concentrates on Promotion and Placement/Distribution through various forms of marketing communications and distribution. From a managerial perspective, applications embrace physical as well as promotions/sales, and digital supply chains through internal and external channels using traditional channels, digital channels, and social networks. Prerequisite: Acceptance in the College of Business’ Bachelor of Science in Business Marketing Management accelerated degree completion program and successful completion of RCBC 310, RCBC 320, RCBC 330, and RCBC 340
    Course Syllabus

  • MKMC 436 Consumer and Business Markets Behavior

    This course emphasizes concepts, principles, and theories in consumer and business purchasing behavior. It focuses on factors influencing customer behavior, such as buying habits, attitude formation, attitude change, analyzing consumer and organizational markets, and related ethical issues. Particular attention is placed on changing market influences, such as digital marketing and social media, to forecast and shape consumer and business purchasing preferences. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.

  • MKMC 443 Public Relations, E-Portfolio, and Market Plans

    This course applies the body of knowledge and skills gained in the Marketing Management program to prepare and present personal and organizational marketing plans and portfolios. The course also uses multidisciplinary approaches to public relations and marketing in an integrated communication approach to manage stakeholder communication. Prerequisite: Acceptance in the College of Business’ Bachelor of Science in Marketing Management accelerated degree completion program and successful completion of RCBC 310, RCBC 320, RCBC 330, RCBC 340, MKMC 421, MKMC 423, and MKMC 433
    Course Syllabus

  • MKMC 446 Advertising, Sales and Distribution Management

    This course concentrates on promotion and placement/distribution of products and services through various forms of marketing communications and channel management. From a managerial perspective, applications embrace physical promotions and sales, as well as digital supply chains through internal and external channels using traditional channels, digital channels, and social networks. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.

  • MKMC 456 Foundations of Fiscal Management

    This course focuses on the practical application of accounting concepts, processes, and financial data analysis from the overall organization perspective with a marketing focus. The business information systems management receives discussion. Emphasis will be placed on how to use these basic concepts when marketing in today’s global environment. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.

  • MKMC 466 Global Marketing Management

    This course examines and relates global marketing management theory and practices stressing strategies for operations and marketing in a global economy. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.

  • MKMC 476 Capstone and Public Relations

    This course applies the body of knowledge and skills gained in the Marketing Management program to prepare and present personal marketing plans. The course emphasizes an integrated communication approach to public relations and marketing. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.

  • MLC 640 Leadership Theories and Research

    This course explores the field of leadership through classic readings and research on such topics as the history of leadership, leader disposition, motivation, charismatic leadership, transformational leadership, and servant leadership. Emphasis will be placed on critiquing contemporary leadership research that addresses current leadership challenges for individuals, groups, and organizations.
    Course Syllabus

  • MLC 641 Developing Leader Effectiveness

    Are leaders born or made? For the purposes of this course, the answer is “yes” – leaders are born and made. To this end, this course presents research and techniques that can be used to leverage one’s own inherent leadership capabilities. Individuals will learn to lead through developing readiness and self-awareness. Leadership development topics such as overcoming personal hardships, self-assessment and awareness, and giving and receiving feedback will be discussed in terms of formal leader development programs.

  • MLC 642 Leadership and Team Dynamics

    This course presents theories and models for practicing effective leadership at the team level by identifying stages of teams development and roles in a team structure, how to avoid group think, avoid barriers to the team communication, and determine the source of team conflict barriers. Topics such as group formation, cohesion and development, structure and power will be examined. Emphasis will be placed on evaluating the effects of individual and organizational influences on team processes and performance.
    Course Syllabus

  • MLC 643 Social Psychology of Leadership

    This course examines several major social-psychological theories and experiments that have informed the study of leadership. Classic experiments on obedience, conformity, social influence, and impression management will be critiqued to analyze how situations influence leader and follower behavior. Students will also learn how attributions, social perception, attitudes, personality, and social behavior affect leader- follower interactions.
    Course Syllabus

  • MLC 644 Leadership and Organizational Performance

    Leaders are often viewed as the driving forces of performance in organizations. Throughout this course, students will review the various roles of leaders and how effective leadership impacts performance at different levels of the organization. Students will conduct an assessment and critique of leadership and organizational performance metrics.
    Course Syllabus

  • MLC 660 Strategic Leadership

    This course analyzes principles of strategy for leading organizations. Students will conduct an assessment and analysis of existing strategic initiatives, leadership development issues, and strategic positioning of the organization. Emphasis is placed on alignment of strategic resources with organizational goals.
    Course Syllabus

  • MLC 661 Leading Change in Organizations

    Purposeful change is part of an organization's overall strategic plan. In this course, students analyze the roles of leaders in relation to implementing and facilitating changes within their organizations with a focus on motivating individuals through mentoring and coaching.

  • MLC 680 Applied Leadership Project

    This is the culminating course in the MLC program. Students will design, implement, and present an applied project or thesis that focuses on a real-life issue in leadership. Prerequisite – 27 credit hours completed in the MLC program.
    Course Syllabus

  • MMC 520 Writing and Presenting with Authority and Purpose

    The beliefs and behaviors of leaders and societies are influenced by effective writing. This course offers student leaders best practices in business communication with special emphasis on business writing and presentations. Students focus on composing written messages—emails, memos, letters, blog postings, and presentations—with and without Power Point and other visuals that communicate with purpose, persuasion, confidence, and credibility.
    Course Syllabus

  • MMC 540 21st Century Communication Technologies

    New communication technologies enable a shift from static information for clearly defined stakeholders to dynamic communities of interest with blurred lines of responsibility and leadership. Students in this course investigate organizational changes fostered by electronic collaboration, social networking, idea sharing, and knowledge building. Students experiment with new communication tools and analyze readings about the impact of rapidly changing methods of communication on organizational cultures.
    Course Syllabus

  • MMC 560 Interpersonal and Intercultural Communication

    In this course, students focus on higher level communication skills necessary to understand and resolve both individual and group issues in a multicultural /gendered workforce. Students will research and discuss best practices for professional behavioral expectations and for confronting problems and misconceptions whether conducting business locally or globally.
    Course Syllabus

  • MMC 580 Leadership and Organizational Communication

    In this course, students examine organizational culture and the process of developing appropriate leadership skills within diverse situational contexts. Students will explore how effective leaders communicate within an organizational climate, and how business, societal and personal expectations can impact the development and practice of leadership.
    Course Syllabus

  • MMC 610 Conflict and Negotiation

    Students in this course address the mediation of change, and how one confronts challenges through problem solving, resolution strategies, human management and personal skill. In addition, participants examine the appropriate and varying mediums for conflict resolution and skilled negotiation.

  • MMC 620 Critical Thinking Case Studies

    In this course, students learn to assimilate and analyze communication research and organizational case studies. Participants focus on problem solving communication issues and how those issues may fit in the context of daily operations or larger strategic plans.
    Course Syllabus

  • MMC 640 Ethics and Decision Making

    Students examine the principles and practices of ethical behaviors at individual, organizational and social levels, and how decision making reflects ethical principles. In addition, students address appropriate organizational response to ethical dilemmas and effective modes for communicating such response.
    Course Syllabus

  • MMC 680 Managerial Communication Capstone

    This capstone course requires students to communicate a comprehensive understanding of accumulated knowledge and skills by identifying, analyzing, and proposing solutions to a managerial communication problem in the workplace. Students will make a multi-media presentation of their findings. Prerequisite: Successful completion of 18 credits in the Managerial Communication core.
    Course Syllabus

  • MPA 600 Foundation in Public Administration

    This course examines the economic, political, cultural and social aspects of the public sector and the roles of the various actors with regard to public administration and the public policy process. Styles and theories relevant to the dynamic orientation of public organization also will be analyzed.
    Course Syllabus

  • MPA 605 Communications in the Public Sector

    Students will realize various aspects of communication within a public organization. Topics include written and oral presentation, internal communication, grant writing, public and media relations and technological issues associated with communicating in the public sector.
    Course Syllabus

  • MPA 615 Public Administration Term 1 Project

    Students will be asked to apply communication styles and techniques to research and explain various aspects of the funding for a public organization. In this course students learn how to conduct both on-line and library-based research. They will learn how to organize, develop and edit a letter of intent, and to complete a funding project during the program. (1 credit hr)
    Course Syllabus

  • MPA 620 Organizational Modeling & Decision Theories

    Students explore various public administration models and decision-making theories that can be used to lead and manage public organizations and to affect public policy. Students will evaluate the potential effectiveness of the models and theories studied in relation to their own organizations and/or case studies of public organizations and public policies.
    Course Syllabus

  • MPA 625 Human Resources and Organizational Effectiveness

    Students examine a variety of human resource topics from a public administration perspective including how human resource issues might impact organizational effectiveness. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Master of Public Administration Program
    Course Syllabus

  • MPA 635 Public Administration Term 2 Project

    Students develop and present a project based on one subject or a combination of subjects from the two courses in Term 2 of the MPA Program; MPA 620 Organizational Modeling and Decision Theories and MPA 625 Human Resources and Organizational Effectiveness. (1 credit hr)
    Course Syllabus

  • MPA 640 Strategic Planning and Policy Development

    This course highlights the organizational planning and management within public and non-profit institutions that enable an organization to position and maintain itself as a viable entity. The process of aligning policy, funding sources and planning goals will be examined as well as an overview of the general planning process.
    Course Syllabus

  • MPA 645 Finance for the Public Administrator

    This course serves as an overview of the budgeting process as a political process within the public sector. Topics include budget methods and practices, capital budgeting, budget structure and project evaluation.
    Course Syllabus

  • MPA 655 Public Administration Term 3 Project

    Students will consider the role of the public administrator in the research, application, procurement, and disbursement of public and quasi-public funds. They will learn the methods and techniques upon a jurisdiction utilizing these sources of funds. Students will study the characteristics and advantages of various forms of bonds, loans, grants, and incentives available and the requirements of each. (1 credit hr)
    Course Syllabus

  • MPA 660 Contemporary Issues in Public Administration

    Students explore a variety of contemporary issues in public administration through an analysis of related case studies. Topics may include issues such as homeland security, emergency management, disaster response, use of technology, and diversity management.
    Course Syllabus

  • MPA 665 Public Administration Leadership

    Students examine various leadership theories to analyze the styles, traits, and behaviors and associate them with effective leadership in public administration. Students use their knowledge of leadership theories to evaluate past and current public leaders as well as themselves as potential leaders.
    Course Syllabus

  • MPA 675 Public Administration Term 4 Project

    Students develop a project based on one subject or a combination of subjects from either course in this term or a combination of the two courses. The focus of the project is to allow students to investigate areas of personal and professional interest through a project of their own design as agreed upon with the instructor. Students will determine an appropriate depth and breadth to the project, as well as will determine an appropriate deadline for submitting the project prior to the end of the term. (1 credit hr)
    Course Syllabus

  • MPM 606 Organizational Structures and Practices

    This course introduces those concepts of organizational culture and behavior that play a role in facilitating change and growth. Management systems, structures, informal and formal culture, processes, and strategy will be examined. Emphasis will be placed on approaches that address expectations, communication, performance, collaboration, and globalization.
    Course Syllabus

  • MPM 613 Emerging Trends in Project Management

    This course will include an exploration of the project management field and future trends. Focus will be based on current events, research in the field, and trends through the next decade. Topics such as people management, turning around an unsuccessful project, risk culture, and change control will be examined.
    Course Syllabus

  • MPM 633 Schedule Management

    This course examines schedule management processes, from planning to execution to control. Focus will be on the project charter, work breakdown structures, resource management, and earned value management. Prerequisites: successful completion of CIS 665
    Course Syllabus

  • MPM 643 Cost Control in Projects

    This course provides an exploration of cost estimation and control methods for the management of project financials. Earned value management, estimating procedures, budgeting, sensitivity analysis, and variance analysis will be explored.
    Course Syllabus

  • MPM 663 Quality in Projects

    This course provides an in-depth examination of quality functions within a project. Emphasis is placed on the application of quality management principles and standards. Quality management topics related to project planning, measurement, execution, and control will be explored. Prerequisite: CIS 633 or acceptance into the Master of Project Management Program (MPM)
    Course Syllabus

  • MPM 673 Procurement and Contract Management

    This course will review how goods and services are acquired in a project management setting. Creation of an RFP with timeline, source selection criteria, contract pricing, terms, conditions, and contract award will be used to investigate this knowledge area.
    Course Syllabus

  • MPM 683 Agile Project Management

    This course covers characteristics and delivery frameworks for Agile project management. The course also explores how agile methods differ from traditional project management, along with how to use Agile techniques to successfully manage projects.
    Course Syllabus

  • MPM 693 Practicum in Project Management

    This course is a culmination of project management concepts, tools and techniques that have been explored through previous course work. Students will synthesize and evaluate processes for application within a project research study. Prerequisites: successful completion of all MPM program-specific courses.
    Course Syllabus

  • MPS 500 Science and Technology Innovation

    This course explores concepts of ideation and innovation in science and technology. It covers techniques of how to apply known ideas to new situations or in new ways to create original concepts. Topics are introduced through case studies of successful scientific or technological innovations and individually created technology innovation ideas.
    Course Syllabus

  • MPS 505 Residency I

    The purpose of Residency I is to meet with program mentors and network with fellow students and entrepreneurs. A speaker series will be organized that can be attended either locally or virtually. In preparation for this residency students will submit and share networking information beforehand. This residency is planned early on in the program to promote collaboration and teambuilding, which are essential skills for professional entrepreneurship. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission

  • MPS 510 Fundamentals of Economics

    This course provides an introduction to micro- and macroeconomics and introduces the concepts of capitalism, competition and monopoly, growth, inflation and interest rate. Fundamental economic concepts are discussed based on applications that address current economic problems. In addition to introducing the fundamental concepts, the course focuses on how these concepts are applicable to science and technology ventures.

  • MPS 520 Portfolio I: Innovation Plan

    Generate a draft plan describing your scientific or technological innovation in your field. The plan will be developed in collaboration with a Faculty mentor. Prerequisite: Recommended: MPS 500 Science and Technology Innovation.

  • MPS 530 Emerging Markets in Science and Technology

    This course explores how to effectively understand the global scientific marketplace. Focus points are on rapidly emerging markets, developing global value chains and the exploration of global contemporary health and technological issues. The course will highlight the emerging business opportunities in the next five years and discuss the challenges and how to successfully address these opportunities.

  • MPS 550 Financial Modeling for Innovation

    This course provides coverage of how to analyze and construct financial statements (income statements, cash flow statements, and balance sheets) and provides an introduction to corporate finance and accounting principles. In addition, financial models for a pro forma venture in a technology field are generated to apply the learned skills.

  • MPS 560 Business Plan Development

    This course provides an understanding of venture creation and what is needed to write a successful business plan for a science or technology based company. Topics included are how to create a competitive advantage, risk assessment planning, and the importance of having a business plan for fundraising. A specific focus is provided on successful business plans for high value, high growth science and technology ventures.

  • MPS 580 Entrepreneurial Marketing

    This course introduces the conceptual frameworks in market strategy and market assessment with reference to the bioscience and technology industries. This includes discussion of strategies to develop comprehensive market research related to a specific scientific or technological innovation. Other topics that are explored are building a successful market and sales plan, how to communicate with prospective customers and sustainable customer relationship management.

  • MPS 590 Energy and Sustainability in the 21st Century

    This course provides an overview of emerging technologies that focus on natural resource and energy conservation. In addition, the course explores energy sources and overall energy needs and impacts. Coverage includes a comparative study of the trends, status and policies of alternative energy technologies and how these can be applied to industrial or residential scale projects, both currently and in the future. Specific topics also include biofuels and synthetic fuels, emerging technologies of energy capture (i.e. solar, wind, geothermal, etc.) and innovative energy management systems.

  • MPS 591 Food Sciences: Global Innovations

    This course provides a general overview of ‘traditional’ food science and moves into current innovations, for example nutraceuticals, functional and medical foods. Topics explored include advancements in biotechnology related to food production, food processing innovations, the global impact of these innovations and the scientific, technological, regulatory and ethical challenges that the industry faces.

  • MPS 592 Fundamentals of Bioinformatics

    This course introduces bioinformatics as an interdisciplinary field that uses the data storing, analysis and management power from IT and applies it to a growing amount of biological data. Topics covered will include current developments in genome sequencing and large-scale protein analysis, the use of bioinformatics as a new way of drug discovery and data mining in health sciences and disease pattern recognition. Topics will be introduced based on real life and current biological problems. In addition the course will explore recent commercial developments using bioinformatics.

  • MPS 600 Science and Technology Business Strategy

    This course provides an introduction to business strategy concepts, with an emphasis on the business of biosciences and technology. Focus points include venture formation and planning, acquiring organizing and managing resources and developing a profit and harvest plan. This course also covers the importance of creating a strategic competitive advantage, challenges with organizational structure, and the need for a sustainable growth plan.

  • MPS 610 Legal Formation of Technology Ventures

    This course introduces concepts of how to legally protect scientific and technological innovations and build intellectual property. In addition the course covers the different legal forms of firms and discusses legal considerations involved in each of these. Other topics include an introduction to fundamentals of regulatory affairs that pertain to specific scientific fields.

  • MPS 620 Portfolio II: Market Potential Plan

    Generate a market research and sales strategy plan related to the technology from Portfolio I. The plan will be developed in collaboration with a Faculty mentor. Prerequisite: MPS 520 Portfolio I and recommended MPS 580 Entrepreneurial Marketing.

  • MPS 630 Business and Science Leadership

    Topics covered in this course include effective writing and oral communication techniques, personal brand development, teamwork and leadership. Topics are introduced through group discussions, assignments and lectures from faculty and industry experts from specific scientific or technological fields. Emphasis is placed on the role of leadership to successfully start, execute and manage a new venture. Coverage includes how to engage peers, prospective team members and stakeholders in the new venture, and how to communicate to a variety of audiences. Discussion also includes the application of ethical principles to business management.

  • MPS 640 Portfolio III: Business Plan

    Generate a formal business plan and present how your innovative idea is fundable and can be the basis of a new technology venture. Prerequisite: MPS 620 Portfolio II and MPS 560 Business Plan Development.

  • MPS 650 Residency II

    The purpose of Residency II is to pitch the innovation to a team of potential investors, business professionals and community members. This residency will be near the end of the program and students will work with the program mentors to organize the pitch. Students will have a chance to pitch either locally or virtually. A feedback report is requested from students after this residency. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission

  • MSEM 500 Public Sector Emergency Management

    This course examines the role of the public sector in the role emergency management including the role and relationship of each level of government in a natural or manmade disaster. The role and interaction of government emergency management agencies at the local, county, state, and federal levels will be investigated.

  • MSEM 510 Governmental Roles in Emergency Management

    This course examines the governmental positions and roles specific to the management of emergency situations through the emergency management cycle. The gap that can exist between emergency managers and operational personnel as well as approaches to narrowing the gap will be discussed.

  • MSEM 520 Public Sector Emergency Planning Project

    Students will complete a planning project that identifies lessons learned from a past disaster relative to the effectiveness of planning and resource allocation. This course is taken in conjunction with MSEM 500 & MSEM 510.

  • MSEM 530 Private Sector Emergency Management

    This course examines the role of the private sector in emergency mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery. The specific role of hospitals, transportation, utility and other businesses as well as non-profit organizations will be discussed.

  • MSEM 540 Business Continuity Planning

    This course examines crisis management thinking and steps for defining a business continuity plan to meet a private organization's needs. The importance of understanding the risks, impacts and consequences of an emergency event will be distinguished. Strategy selection, salvage, restoration and long term continuity will be discussed.

  • MSEM 550 Business Continuity Project

    Students will develop and present a business continuity plan aimed at the needs of a particular organization in the private sector. This course is taken in conjunction with MSEM 530 & MSEM 540.

  • MSEM 600 Leadership and Management in Emergency Management

    This course examines leadership strategies and management techniques supportive of emergency managers during emergency planning and disaster response. Models of leadership and contemporary theories of leadership will be discussed.

  • MSEM 610 Ethical Issues in Emergency Management

    This course examines the ethical issues of disaster related to all phases of the emergency management cycle. Ethical risks, principles and obligations during times of disaster will be discussed.

  • MSEM 620 Disaster Management Analysis Project

    Students will complete a project that identifies lessons learned from a past disaster relative to the influence of legal and ethical issues in the success or failure of the disaster response. This course is taken in conjunction with MSEM 600 & MSEM 610.

  • MSEM 630 Resource Allocation and Funding Sources for Emergency Management

    This course examines the complexities of resource allocation and availability. Memorandums of understanding and joint purchasing will be explored. Locating sources of grant funding will also be addressed.

  • MSEM 640 Grant Writing for Emergency Management

    This course examines the process of writing and obtaining a grant. Grant writing submission guidelines and writing techniques will be examined. Purchasing, monitoring and reporting requirements for complying with the requirements of grant funding will be discussed.

  • MSEM 650 Emergency Management Grant Writing Project

    Students will write and present a grant aimed at attaining funding specific to the needs of a particular organization. This course is taken in conjunction with MSEM 630 & MSEM 640.

  • MSF 605 Nature of the Firm: Governance, Sustainability, and Compliance

    This course engages students in an understanding and discussion of the history, development, and purpose of the modern firm in an international context. Topics include the historical development of limited liability, the legal personality of the firm, governance and the role and perspective of stakeholders. The course covers modern theories of the nature of the firm and their impact on financing the Firm. The course introduces students to the nature of capital, capital creation, corporate social responsibility, and management as it relates to the perspectives of the various stakeholders in the Firm. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing
    Course Syllabus

  • MSF 610 Financial Statement Analysis in Global Markets

    This course focuses on the analysis and evaluation of the key financial statements—Income Statement, Balance Sheet, and Cash Flow Statement. The emphasis is on understanding the components of each statement. Topics include financial statements, financial ratio analysis and development, common size statements, pro-forma non-GAAP statements, EBITDA, accounting principles (matching and revenue recognition, accruals, etc.). Emphasis is on understanding the Accounting assumptions and principles under GAAP and IFRS that underlie the reported data. In addition, certain tax topics will be covered that relate to and should be considered when making financial decisions within for-profit organizations. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing
    Course Syllabus

  • MSF 615 Business Conditions in Global Markets

    This course addresses the macroeconomic environment and its impact on decisions faced by the firm. Topics include the business cycle, trade and capital flows, foreign exchange, international yield curves, and the impact of fiscal, monetary, and tax policy in the international framework. Students are introduced to the study, measurement, and use of economic indicators available internationally to gauge the current state and trend of international business conditions. The focus is to understand how economic conditions influence decision making of an organization. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing
    Course Syllabus

  • MSF 620 Applied Methods of Analysis for Problem Solving and Decision Making

    This course presents qualitative and quantitative methods and tools for decision makers to analyze data and solve problems. The course discusses relevant and practical statistical concepts. The course emphasizes the functionality of spreadsheets for the effective analysis and presentation of problems and solutions. Topics include data display, visualization and analysis; central tendency and distribution; expected values, variance, standard deviation, covariance, correlations, probability, regression basics, decision trees, scenario and sensitivity analysis; Monte Carlo modeling, and the strategic base concepts of Game Theory. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing
    Course Syllabus

  • MSF 625 Financial Markets: Capital Sources, Liquidity and Risk

    This course addresses the capital formation alternatives and decisions related to the capital structure of the firm and the value of the firm. Topics include qualitative and quantitative nature of financial markets; underwriting processes; alternative sources of capital and capital structure; money and capital markets; loans and covenants; bankruptcy risk; venture capital; private equity; cost of capital; and management of cash and liquidity. Prerequisites: MSF 605, 610, 615, and 620
    Course Syllabus

  • MSF 630 Valuation I – Capital Budgeting and Foundations of Valuation

    This course investigates the foundations of valuation analysis and why valuation is central to financial decision making and business leadership strategies. The focus is on applying valuation analysis to capital budgeting decisions to enhance organizational value. Topics include TVM foundations, capital budgeting foundations; cash flow analysis; real option analysis; lease analysis; intangible valuation analysis; and uncertainty analysis. Prerequisites: MSF 610 and 620
    Course Syllabus

  • MSF 635 Valuation II – Bond, Equity and Firm Valuation Analysis

    This course further advances students’ proficiency in valuation analysis through applications of security and firm valuation principles. Topics include equity valuation; CAPM; efficient market implications (EMH); fixed income and bond valuation; merger/acquisition analysis; and international market issues. Prerequisites: MSF 610, 620, and 630
    Course Syllabus

  • MSF 640 Enterprise Risk Management in Global Markets

    This course focuses on understanding and mastering the core concepts involved in the process of enterprise risk management namely identifying, characterizing, analyzing and managing enterprise risk in a global market. The course provides a framework for a strategic and holistic analysis of enterprise risk based on a portfolio view of the firm. The focus is on qualitative issues in developing a broad understanding of enterprise risk and its core components – strategic, operational, financial, hazard, and emerging risks - as they relate to the objectives of the firm. Prerequisite: MSF 625
    Course Syllabus

  • MSF 645 Investments: Integration of Markets, Enterprise Risk and Investments for Value Optimization

    This course addresses core elements of investment strategies and portfolio management concepts of asset allocation relevant to the nature and risks of managing financial intermediaries as well as financial management within a firm. Topics include portfolio analysis; derivative securities; financial intermediaries [banks, mutual funds, etc.]; venture capital; private equity; hedge funds; mutual funds; duration; high yield analysis; regulatory agencies, roles, and frameworks [FDIC, FED, SEC, CFTC, international regulators-Central Banks], etc. Prerequisite: MSF 640
    Course Syllabus

  • MSF 650 Leadership and Communication in Business: Holistic Financial Strategies for Value Optimization

    This course provides an integrating summary of the core elements of the program and solidifies the strategic leadership perspective of the finance discipline in networking and communicating with diverse internal and external stakeholders to maximize firm value within the financial, economic and political environments the firm operates in. Topics include project management, system analysis, causal loop analysis, emotional intelligence, capital development, business strategy, sustained growth and effective communication. Prerequisites: MSF 625, 630, 635, 640, and 645.
    Course Syllabus

  • MSM 500 Management of People in Society

    This course focuses on the management of self and others with an emphasis on administration and interpretation of diagnostic instruments which help clarify behaviors and skills which influence organizational and interpersonal outcomes. It covers the context of management in the organization, skills needed to effectively work with people in organizations, such as emotional intelligence and the roles people fill on the leader- manager-innovator continuum. All courses in the MSM Core require a Manager Reflection Journal to be kept by all students to focus on key learnings and applications throughout the program.
    Course Syllabus

  • MSM 510 Foundations of Management Processes

    This course focuses on developing skills with which to engage others in an organization, including mentoring, coaching and communicating. Emphasis is placed on practice and mastery of behaviors that enhance organizational relationships such as facilitation, mediation, visioning and storytelling, teaching, decision-making and strategic planning.
    Course Syllabus

  • MSM 520 Management of Resources

    This course focuses on the process of aligning resources within an organization to accomplish goals. Specific processes such as budgeting, resource allocation, incentives and benefits are covered along with practice in allocating resources in a collaborative manner.
    Course Syllabus

  • MSM 601 Entrepreneurship and Business Plan Development

    This course is designed to introduce students to the entrepreneurial mindset, including the concepts of innovation and newness. Students evaluate a variety of entrepreneurial activities, including outright ownership, franchising, outsourcing and partnerships. Traits and characteristics of successful entrepreneurs and entrepreneurial teams will be covered along with aligning organizational design with the business goals, strategy and business model, defining key roles, core competency requirements & job specifications, and recruiting and building the team. The final project in this course is the development of a Business Plan for an idea of the student’s choosing.

  • MSM 602 Entrepreneurial Finance

    This course will deal with the sources of capital for early stage companies and the implications of the decisions a company makes to fund its operations. It also explores issues in the valuation of ventures and how the achievement of milestones can impact that valuation. Venture capital and angel investors are also covered. Lastly, the course will explore accounting and finance techniques to monitor the success of the enterprise. It will provide the skills and techniques to manage the business by the numbers exploring methods successful entrepreneurs use to understand their costs and cost drivers, break- even point and integrating these into an activity based forecast for their business.
    Course Syllabus

  • MSM 603 Creativity, Sustainability and Innovation

    This course covers promoting and marketing an entrepreneurial idea from its inception to the marketplace. The course is designed for exploring the unique marketing strategies required to exploit entrepreneurial opportunities. It will also focus is on issues surrounding companies with high growth potential, an interest in sustainability and the creativity needed to develop innovative marketing for these environments.

  • MSM 604 Family Business & Self Employment

    This course is centered on the single-person or family business and the issues associated with business transition planning. The course covers development and implementation of strategy for small businesses, and succession planning for the entrepreneur. It also covers valuation issues and timetables for moving profitably out of a business.

  • MSM 605 Small Business Operations

    This course is designed for anyone who is charged with managing the day-to-day operation of a small to medium firm. It covers planning, budgeting, payroll issues, business taxation issues and use of tools and techniques to ensure that small business owners can comply with established laws keep accurate records and produce helpful reports for managerial decision-making.

  • MSM 610 Management of Organizational Relationships

    This course focuses on skill-building the necessary leverage skills to be effective on the leader-manager-innovator continuum. Emphasis is placed on structuring organizational efforts, staffing with diverse resources, establishing partnerships and other collaborative efforts and maintaining a cohesive organization.

  • MSM 620 Learning Management & Mastery

    This course focuses on personal learning styles and methods to enhance learning. It examines the relationship between behavior, cognition and meta-cognition. It also focuses on organizational learning and the learning organization and how organizational effectiveness can be enhanced with learning.

  • MSM 630 Management of Metrics & Measurement

    This course focuses on quantitative and qualitative measurement and research practiced by those responsible for organizational leadership. There is specific emphasis on use of tools such as surveys and focus groups to gather data needed to make sound decisions about the organization and its resources.
    Course Syllabus

  • MSM 650 Portfolio Development – Capstone

    This course focuses on collection and presentation of a cohesive representation of a personal portfolio accumulated during completion of the program. Prerequisites: MSM 500, MSM 510, MSM 520, MSM 610, MSM 620, MSM 630

  • MSMK 600 Marketing Strategies

    Examines key concepts and issues in developing and selecting a marketing strategy that supports an organization’s vision and strategic plan. Emphasis is placed on target market, designing product, price, promotional, and distribution strategies.

  • MSMK 605 Buyer Behavior

    Addresses achieving optimal customer experience and competitive advantage by identifying and incorporating the psychological, sociological, economic, and anthropological, theoretical and research based influences of buyer decisions in an organization’s marketing strategy.

  • MSMK 610 Strategic Internet Marketing

    Analysis of consumer behavior in a digital environment. Emphasis is placed on developing and managing online, social media and other digital platform campaign strategies to attract and retain consumers.

  • MSMK 615 Ethical and Legal Issues in Marketing

    Ethical and legal issues influencing marketing strategy are addressed including: online behavioral tracking, negative advertising, privacy considerations, patent trolling, selective marketing to vulnerable consumer groups, product placement, pricing and distribution strategies, auditing ethical marketing practices and the regulation of marketing practices by domestic and international government entities.

  • MSMK 620 Marketing Analytics

    Techniques used to measure marketing performance and their effectiveness in generating optimal return on investment (ROI) serve as the focus for this course. Also emphasized is the use of predictive marketing analytics such as correlation analysis, profit analysis and lifetime value measurement to drive product placement and to better understand customer preference and purchasing trends.

  • MSMK 625 Qualitative Analysis

    Focus is placed on identifying, describing and interpreting qualitative data such as surveys, focus groups and projective techniques. Also included are techniques used to develop, code and analyze thematic analysis of consumer opinions to drive and support marketing decisions.

  • MSMK 630 Social Media

    Opportunities and limitations in applying and critically evaluating various social media strategies are addressed. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of social media for consumer engagement and building influence, to include advertising, public relations, marketing, and journalism, via hands-on experience with the most.

  • MSMK 635 Social Media Marketing Campaigns

    Development and implementation of a social media marketing campaign, determining effective measurement strategies and evaluating its success serves as the focus of this course. Applications for this course include key elements such as determining and matching social media tactics with the appropriate target market and developing strategies to engage those markets using relevant social media channels.

  • MSMK 640 Website and Search Engine Marketing/Search Engine Optimization/SEO

    Introduction to content marketing, search engine marketing (SEM) and search engine optimization (SEO) for website optimization. Benefits and consequences of content marketing and search engine marketing and how marketers can use it as a sustainable tool and leverage these interrelated tools for reaching and engaging consumers and creating value are addressed.

  • MSMK 645 Marketing Finance

    The relationship between marketing strategy and the overall fiscal health of the firm are assessed. Emphasis is placed on the calculations and the analytical tools necessary to formulate a comprehensive marketing plan and quantify the contributions of marketing initiatives to increase business value and sustainability.

  • MSMK 650 Brand Management

    Examination of the strategic importance of brand and its management. The representational import of branding to consumers and the management of brand is analyzed. Focus is placed on developing a tactical guideline for building, measuring, and managing brand equity.

  • MSMK 655 Advertising and Promotions Management

    Specific activities involved in managing an advertising campaign, including market research, media selection, copywriting, layouts and the role of ad agencies are examined. Students create an advertising and promotional strategy that employs an appropriate mix of message objectives and methods.

  • MSOP 535 Innovative Leadership & Organizational Creativity

    In this course, students learn the importance of innovation as a fundamental source with which organizations achieve competitive advantage. The focus of the course is on learning how to systematically foster innovation within an organization as an innovative leader.

  • MSOP 602 Performance Management

    In this course, students learn how to develop an effective performance management system that will maximize employee performance by aligning individual and group performance with organizational goals. Course topics include the history of and status on performance management, problem solving, communicating, linking organizational goals, risk and analytics.
    Course Syllabus

  • MSOP 606 Designing and Conducting Performance Improvement Interventions

    In this course, students learn how to apply performance improvement interventions to improve output. Course topics include conducting and analyzing needs assessments, organizational design choices, selecting, implementing, and evaluating performance improvement interventions.
    Course Syllabus

  • MSOP 610 Coaching and Mentoring for High Performance

    In this course, students learn about coaching and mentoring in relation to helping each employee improve and maintain performance for maximum output. Students learn about the differences between coaching and mentoring and identify which is useful and appropriate when interacting with employees.
    Course Syllabus

  • MSOP 614 Leading for Innovation

    In this course, students learn the importance of innovation as a fundamental source with which organizations achieve competitive advantage. The focus of the course is learning how to systematically foster innovation within an organization.
    Course Syllabus

  • MSOP 618 Leading Organizational Change

    In this course, students learn how to develop and promote cultures within their organizations that not only accept, but embrace change. Students also learn how to proactively drive development in order to enable their organizations to remain competitive and relevant in the global market.
    Course Syllabus

  • MSOP 622 Stimulating Creativity in Organizations

    In this course, students learn how to stimulate organizational innovation by developing an environment that promotes and develops individual creativity. It provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to promote and develop employee creativity as part of an overall plan to stimulate organizational innovation.
    Course Syllabus

  • MSOP 626 Organizational Design

    In this course, students learn how to apply advanced conceptual and theoretical perspectives to the design of organizations and the linkage mechanisms that organizations must develop to manage their environments. Students practice diagnosing and resolving organizational problems related to the growth, survival and decline of organizations. Research emphasis is placed on how size, structure, technology and organizational culture impacts operations, strategic contingencies and competitive advantage.
    Course Syllabus

  • MSOP 630 Talent Management

    In this course, students learn different methods of managing talent to help build organizational cultures dedicated to value creation. Students will further study the concept of organizational talent as our top competitive advantage.
    Course Syllabus

  • MSOP 634 Ethical Decision Making

    In this course, students learn how to apply ethical theory to modern ethical dilemmas. Students also learn how to utilize analytical decision-making tools within complex real-life situations.
    Course Syllabus

  • MSOP 638 Crafting a Strategic Vision

    In this course, students learn how to develop an understanding of how strategies are formulated and implemented within the organization. The integration of the functional areas of management and how to deal with the various trade-offs from the perspective of management are considered. Emphasis is placed on the role of strategy development in unifying the organization.
    Course Syllabus

  • MSOP 642 Applied Management Research

    In this course, students perform the general art of collection, analysis and transformation of data into information for the purpose of decision making. Descriptive methods are introduced for graphical, tabular and numerical summarization of data.
    Course Syllabus

  • MSOP 646 Applied Project

    In this course, students focus on organizational problem solving and entrepreneurial endeavors, with an eye toward preparing a final paper that students can use to demonstrate their managerial competencies.
    Course Syllabus

  • MSSM 501 Homeland Security Principles and Practices

    The course provides a comprehensive account of past and current homeland security reorganization and practices, policies and programs in relation to the government restructure. Also covered are the actions taken in the aftermath of 9/11 in the areas of legislation, government organization, communications, technology and emergency management. Current organizational structure and responsibilities of the new Department of Homeland Security are reviewed. Case studies and best practices are also examined.
    Course Syllabus

  • MSSM 506 Terrorism and Homeland Defense Fundamentals

    This course introduces students to significant issues in global terrorism. The history and development of terrorism, as well as the psychology, financing, structure, and dynamics of terrorist groups, are examined. It discusses a variety of new indicators, warning methodologies, and analytical tools available to assess and forecast terrorism in its ever-changing forms, as well as reviews the proactive defenses for the long-term protection of our country.
    Course Syllabus

  • MSSM 512 Homeland Security Project One

    Students will complete a homeland security project that outlines and thoroughly explains the homeland security and terrorist threats to their local and state areas. (1 credit hr)
    Course Syllabus

  • MSSM 517 Critical Infrastructure: Analysis and Strategies

    The course presents information on key sectors of society known as “critical infrastructure.” These key sectors are identified as targets for those who wish to harm our national security. The origins of threats are identified from individuals, groups or nation states. Critical infrastructure such as electric power supplies, gas and oil, telecommunications, banking and finance, transportation, water supply systems, emergency services, civil defense, food supply, information distribution, military defense and continuity of government are identified and discussed. The role of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and national organizations are examined as to how they protect against internal or external threats to critical infrastructure. Intelligence collection and alert systems created to prevent and warn against infrastructure attacks are also examined.
    Course Syllabus

  • MSSM 523 Emergency Preparedness and Management

    This course focuses on the role of emergency management in government, community and organizations. The types of threats and the process of preparing, mitigating, responding and recovering from emergencies and disasters are covered. The importance of continuity of operations to sustain business and operations during natural and manmade disasters are also discussed. Topics include threat assessment, risk analysis, formulating a comprehensive plan, training, coordinating with support agencies, and the actual overall management of an emergency or disaster.
    Course Syllabus

  • MSSM 528 Homeland Security Project Two

    The students will prepare a crisis management plan for a fictional local or county government. (1 credit hr)
    Course Syllabus

  • MSSM 602 Principles and Theories of Security Management

    This course is an overview of the principles and issues in business and organizational security management. Students will comprehensively review current, experience proven business practices applicable to security operations. The vital topics of leadership style for the 21st century; managing in times of change, uncertainty and risk; target hardening against crime and terrorism; and taking advantage of available technology are all covered to ensure the student has a comprehensive knowledge base of security management and its role in government and private organizations.
    Course Syllabus

  • MSSM 607 Cyber-Security and Information Protection

    The course provides knowledge of how to successfully defend and protect today’s valuable resources— information and information systems. It covers a systematic and practical approach for establishing, managing and operating a comprehensive information assurance program. The risk of conducting e-Commerce will be thoroughly explored.
    Course Syllabus

  • MSSM 613 Security Management Project One

    Students will prepare a comprehensive Information Assurance policy to protect a fictional organization. (1 credit hr)
    Course Syllabus

  • MSSM 618 Evaluation of Security Programs

    Evaluation of Security Programs is designed to provide students with a solid knowledge of industry standards, practices and methods that will aid in determining the adequacy of security management programs. It also directs students through the complete process of security system design, integration and evaluation. Moreover, this course explores the interplay of management structures, functions, and processes as well as examines state-of-the art management techniques.
    Course Syllabus

  • MSSM 624 Vulnerability Assessment and Risk Analysis

    This course reveals how to recognize security vulnerabilities and analyze risks. Students learn a systematic approach to acquiring and analyzing the information necessary to support decision-makers in the protection of assets and the allocation of security resources.
    Course Syllabus

  • MSSM 629 Security Management Project Two

    Students will conduct a vulnerability study and threat assessment with risk management recommendations at an actual facility or organization. (1 credit hr)
    Course Syllabus

  • NPMT 309 Foundations of Business Communication

    This course focuses on the practical application of business communication. Emphasis will be placed on learning the different types of writing required in the modern business environment including an introduction to professional presentations. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.
    Course Syllabus

  • NPMT 319 Management and Governance of the Non-Profit Organization

    This course is an introduction to non-governmental, nonprofit organizations, and their operational and management practices. The distinguishing features of non-governmental, nonprofit organizations and their relevance to effective performance-based management are addressed in this course. Also covered are the identification and assessment of various organizational designs, governance structures, board and community relations, fiscal structure, and impact of the regulatory environment on the management non-governmental, nonprofit organizations. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.
    Course Syllabus

  • NPMT 329 Decision Making for Non-Profit Organizations

    This course focuses on the knowledge needed to understand and apply processes for making business decisions for non-profit organizations. Emphasis is placed on the role unique relationship non-profit organizations have with the U.S. economy. Emphasis will also be placed on developing critical thinking skills. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.
    Course Syllabus

  • NPMT 410 Management and Governance of the Nonprofit Organization

    This course is an introduction to non-governmental, nonprofit organizations, and their operational and management practices. The distinguishing features of non-governmental, nonprofit organizations and their relevance to effective performance-based management are addressed in this course. Also covered are the identification and assessment of various organizational designs, governance structures, board and community relations, fiscal structure, and impact of the regulatory environment on the management non-governmental, nonprofit organizations.
    Course Syllabus

  • NPMT 420 Financial Management of the Nonprofit Organization

    Financial reporting and monitoring functions are examined through the application of accounting principles particular to non-governmental, nonprofit organizations. Focus is placed on budget development, day-to-day fiscal management, financial controls, and the regulatory reporting requirements of non-governmental, nonprofit organizations.
    Course Syllabus

  • NPMT 426 Foundations of Fiscal Management for Non-Profit Organizations

    This course focuses on the practical application of accounting concepts and processes and financial data analysis for non-profit organizations. The importance of the management of business information systems will also be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on how these basic concepts are used in today’s global business environment. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.
    Course Syllabus

  • NPMT 430 Generating Revenue for the Nonprofit Organization

    Revenue generation for non-governmental nonprofit organizations through grants, contracts and philanthropic efforts are examined in this course. The selection and implementation of other philanthropic and fundraising activities, including social media, are examined through applied analysis of existing strategies used by non-governmental nonprofit organizations. Also featured are applied experience in preparation and management of grants and other organizational funding vehicles.
    Course Syllabus

  • NPMT 436 Generating Revenue for the Non-Profit Organization

    Revenue generation for non-governmental nonprofit organizations through grants, contracts and philanthropic efforts are examined in this course. The selection and implementation of other philanthropic and fundraising activities, including social media, are examined through applied analysis of existing strategies used by non-governmental nonprofit organizations. Also featured are applied experience in preparation and management of grants and other organizational funding vehicles. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.
    Course Syllabus

  • NPMT 440 Strategic Planning and Evaluation for the Sustainable Nonprofit Organization

    This course applies the core principles of the strategic planning process and evaluation to the analysis, development and implementation of intermediate and long range planning for a non-governmental, nonprofit organization. Best practices in strategic plan development and the role of the board in strategy and plan development are examined. Also featured is alliance building in the coordination of service planning and service delivery by multiple nonprofit organizations.
    Course Syllabus

  • NPMT 446 Financial Management of the Non-Profit Organization

    Financial reporting and monitoring functions are examined through the application of accounting principles particular to non-governmental, nonprofit organizations. Focus is placed on budget development, day-to-day fiscal management, financial controls, and the regulatory reporting requirements of non-governmental, nonprofit organizations. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.
    Course Syllabus

  • NPMT 456 Special Issues for Non-Profit Organizations

    This course is an overview of topics that are unique to non-profit organizations, including ethical/legal issues, marketing considerations and global management. Strategies for effective management and evaluation will be examined in this course. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.
    Course Syllabus

  • NPMT 466 Strategic Planning and Evaluation for the Sustainable Non-Profit Organization

    This course applies the core principles of the strategic planning process and evaluation to the analysis, development and implementation of intermediate and long range planning for a non-governmental, nonprofit organization. Best practices in strategic plan development and the role of the board in strategy and plan development are examined. Also featured is alliance building in the coordination of service planning and service delivery by multiple nonprofit organizations. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.

  • NPMT 476 Non-Profit Management Capstone Project

    This course is designed to incorporate all aspects of Non-Profit Management topics by creating a new non-profit organization. Work completed in prior courses will be used and incorporated into a final portfolio that represents a viable non-profit organization. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.
    Course Syllabus

  • PC 101 Introduction to Physics

    This course is designed to teach mechanics, properties of matter, temperature and heat, waves and sound, electricity and magnetism, and optics. (3 credit hrs lecture; 1 credit hr lab)
    Course Syllabus

  • PH 105 For Love of Wisdom

    An introductory Philosophy course that focuses on the basic questions that confront humans throughout their lives: Who am I? What is real? How does the world work? How do we know? What should I do? What has value?
    Course Syllabus

  • PH 115 Ethics in America

    Inspects the main moral issues in modern American life through the media of film and literature and the perspectives that can be applied to our lives and actions.
    Course Syllabus

  • PH 225 World Religions

    This course investigates the culture, beliefs, and practices of the great world religions.
    Course Syllabus

  • PH 230 Christianity: Its History, Practices and Beliefs

    This course introduces students to the basic elements of the Christian religion.
    Course Syllabus

  • PH 311 Applied Problem Solving

    This course emphasizes problem solving and reasoning skills. The concepts and applications will reinforce and enhance a student’s abilities to effectively make judgments, inferences, analyses, forecasts, and assessments. A variety of essential problem solving techniques will be utilized and applied to the problem solving processes.

  • PH 410 Medical Ethics and Leadership

    This course examines relevant definitions and topics of medical ethics and the process of decision making within medical environments.
    Course Syllabus

  • PL 120 Discover Your Value: Turning Experience into College Credits

    This self-paced course provides participants with the opportunity to explore, assess, and document learning mastered through a variety of life experiences. You will be challenged to think holistically and critically about your skills, knowledge and performance capabilities as they relate to college-level and professional-based learning. Participants will use social media to build personal learning networks that support collaborative learning and cooperative engagement. The focus is on identifying college-level content and preparing an experiential learning portfolio.

  • PMGT 300 Organizational Management

    The course provides students with a foundation for developing processes in which organizations analyze and learn from their internal and external environments, establish strategic direction, create strategies that are intended to help achieve established goals, and execute those strategies, all in a effort to satisfy key organizational stakeholders. An emphasis is placed on the importance of making strategic changes that can create sustainable competitive advantage. Ethical issues will be analyzed as these relate to business decisions.
    Course Syllabus

  • PMGT 305 Fundamentals of Project Management

    This course provides an introduction to fundamental project management concepts, processes, and knowledge areas and illustrates the guiding principles that drive the development and management of projects. Focus is placed on identifying strategic direction and meeting stakeholder expectations by developing processes and strategies to achieve business goals and objectives. This course emphasizes ethical decision-making and critical thinking in the project environment.

  • PMGT 310 Business Communications

    The course addresses the many aspects of project communications. Topics to be addressed include relationship management, negotiation, influence, and conflict resolution.
    Course Syllabus

  • PMGT 320 Project Leadership

    This course addresses the development of leadership skills to build and sustain high-performing project teams. Emphasis will be on leadership, team building, team problem solving and decision making, empowerment and coaching, and leading change.
    Course Syllabus

  • PMGT 335 Project Cost

    In this course, students will distinguish different tools and techniques for developing and controlling costs within a project while utilizing various estimating techniques and tools. Coverage includes cost estimates, baselines, and controls in terms of validating actions, reporting, cost outcomes, and variances. Through the use of Earned Value, students will be able to interpret the status of a project at any point in the life cycle.
    Course Syllabus

  • PMGT 400 Project Procurement Management

    The focus of the course will be determining what needs to be purchased or acquired in order to meet the project goals, and determining when and how to acquire those items. Topics include vendor selection, contracting and negotiation.
    Course Syllabus

  • PMGT 410 Project Risk Management

    This course will provide an in-depth analysis of risk management methodologies, from both the strategic and tactical aspects. State-of-the-art tools and techniques for identifying, measuring, and monitoring risks in the project management environment are examined.
    Course Syllabus

  • PMGT 420 Introduction to Project Management

    This course provides the foundation for understanding of project management from a management perspective. This course will cover the aspects of initiating, planning, executing, controlling and closing with scenario based information case studies to help understand the course material.
    Course Syllabus

  • PMGT 425 Applied Project Management

    This course begins the capstone project. Students will work in groups to integrate and apply skills and knowledge acquired in previous courses to an actual business need. For this course and the following two courses, students will work on a project team to develop and present a comprehensive project plan based on a request for proposal (RFP) or a project of their choosing. This course focuses on selecting and defining a project including the development of the project charter, responsibility assignment matrix (RAM), organizational chart, communication plan, and work breakdown structure (WBS). The hands-on, problem-based learning approach in this course allows students to apply problem-solving and critical thinking skills to a real-world scenario and demonstrate effective communication and collaboration.

  • PMGT 430 Advanced Project Management

    This course will cover specific activities that integrate project management principles with their project life cycle, taking them from pre-award to closure. Students will be engaged in the bid process phases, to include major milestones, and capture team concept. In addition, students will investigate and evaluate different methods for measuring project performance, team member selection, project reporting processes, and coordinating projects across the enterprise.
    Course Syllabus

  • PMGT 440 Project Quality Management

    This course will cover the policy, processes, and procedures involved in assuring that projects satisfy the objectives for which they were undertaken. Emphasis is on quality planning, quality assurance, quality control, and process improvement.
    Course Syllabus

  • PS 101 Introduction to Government and Politics

    Basic survey course designed to acquaint the college student with various governmental structures as well as theories of the state. Topics covered include state functions, sovereignty, concepts of law, current governmental systems, and the relationship of the state to the individual.
    Course Syllabus

  • PS 208 Introduction to National Security

    This course introduces students to national security as a concept, strategy, goal, and challenge. It examines the dangers and threats that exist domestically and internationally and analyzes how the United States attempts to deal with those challenges using strategies that range from diplomacy to military force.
    Course Syllabus

  • PS 209 Foundations in Intelligence and Counterintelligence

    This course introduces students to intelligence and counterintelligence as concepts, processes, and careers. It elaborates on historical and contemporary approaches to intelligence/counter intelligence. The process of intelligence collection, analysis, research dissemination, consumption, and feedback is examined. Students are exposed to the diverse intelligence community and the responsibilities of its various members.
    Course Syllabus

  • PS 210 Ethical Controversies in Security and Intelligence

    This course introduces and engages elements of theoretical and ethical analysis to empirical topics and subject matter. Some of the issues covered will include war, weapons of mass destruction, humanitarian intervention, globalization, and spying. This course explores the deeper underlying philosophical issues within national security.
    Course Syllabus

  • PS 305 International Relations

    Survey of the various international political systems with emphasis on the basic factors affecting positions and policies of states, the formulation and shaping of foreign policy, and the instruments and patterns of foreign policy.
    Course Syllabus

  • PS 309 Comparative Politics

    Comparative study of the developed and developing governments with an analysis of political parties, bureaucracies, legislatures, and executives; political development, system stability, military intervention and performance; and political culture and socialization.
    Course Syllabus

  • PS 317 Introductory Geostrategy

    This course introduces the subfield of geostrategy. It takes a holistic approach to the study of geopolitics and foreign policy when guided by geographical factors. It examines how geography can inform, constrain and affect political, economic, and military planning. Topics covered include how a country's resources, position, and physical factors can change and determine its geopolitical objectives and how geography is sometimes inextricable from strategy.
    Course Syllabus

  • PS 318 Essentials in Strategic Thought

    This course promotes the understanding of tactical and strategic thought at the introductory level. The course explores how theory and strategy help form policy by identifying the implications and shifts in long-term strategic patterns and trends. Security culture, use of force, international law, grand strategy, and just and unjust war will be major aspects of course study.
    Course Syllabus

  • PS 319 Topics in Global and Political Studies

    In-depth exploration of particular political subjects or issues not treated or treated only briefly in other courses. Specific titles of courses offered under this heading will be listed in the course schedules for the sessions in which they are offered. Not offered every year.

  • PS 320 Security Concepts in Science and Technology

    This course provides an in-depth understanding of how science and technology impacts national security and intelligence. It examines how important hard science and technology is in developing areas of national security and intelligence. This includes analyzing cyber-security and cyber-warfare, the emerging relationship between the Intelligence Community (IC) and Information Technology (IT), space reconnaissance, and high-tech espionage.
    Course Syllabus

  • PS 403 Guns, Sex, Drugs: Illicit Activity in Global Politics

    This course analyzes transnational crime and corruption issues within global politics. Focus is given to potential national and international responses to transnational threats. This course examines the increasing relevance of criminality and governmental corruption and how it becomes a major aspect of national security policy.
    Course Syllabus

  • PS 404 FREEDOM'S CURSE: Problems in Democratization and Development

    This course examines how democratization projects around the world succeed or fail and the international dynamics that flow from that success/failure. International threats that emerge from the problems and flaws of implementation are investigated in depth. Case studies are used as teaching tools about international involvement and difficulties with that engagement.
    Course Syllabus

  • PS 405 Threats of Terrorism

    This course covers both international and domestic terrorism, as well as domestic extremist groups in the United States. Topics include a brief historical review of terrorism and effective terrorism countermeasures.
    Course Syllabus

  • PS 406 Rogue Leaders and Outlaw States

    This course analyzes issues of leadership and statehood that run contrary to international norms and democratic standards. The course investigates key case studies and how they offer challenges to the global community and international security. Review of current problem areas and issues in world politics and scrutiny of conflict-resolution strategies that are both short and long term are included. How these strategies are employed within U.S. foreign policy and their likely efficacy is also examined.
    Course Syllabus

  • PS 407 Eurasian Political Culture and Security

    The study of Eurasia (defined as Russia, the Caucasus, Central Asia, Afghanistan, and Pakistan) with an emphasis on understanding the different political cultures and security issues across the region. Topics covered include individual domestic concerns, international positions, national security/economic interests, and alliances/conflicts between countries within and beyond the region.
    Course Syllabus

  • PS 408 Rebellion, Insurgency and War

    This course investigates the various forms and differences of internal/domestic conflict. Students will be exposed to the global context of civil war and insurgency. Numerous case studies will be analyzed, exposing students to the nature and characteristics of revolution. Understanding the changes in our concepts of old/new wars and how that impacts international peacekeeping and global intervention will be highlighted. Students consider transnational issues that emerge within domestic conflicts and how democracy emerges as both a cause and effect within rebellion.
    Course Syllabus

  • PS 411 Radical Religion and Political Extremism

    This course examines various fundamentalist movements around the globe and considers the revival of religious radicalism in the 21st century. Students evaluate how various ‘fundamentalisms’ impact domestic and global political processes. The process for morphing religious radicalism into political violence is examined. How various international factors can ameliorate/exacerbate extremism is examined.
    Course Syllabus

  • PS 413 Power, Ideology, and Legitimacy

    The course engages important subtle concepts within global affairs and international relations that form the foundation of political interaction, whether that be state-to-state, state-to-society, or society-to-society. Evaluating how there is an interplay between the three concepts within domestic, foreign, and transnational affairs will be tantamount. Several specific foci will cover: power contestation; ideological influence on regime formation and regime change; legitimation problems, degradation, and corruption; issues of force and legality within state and social actions in terms of affecting political order.

  • PS 415 Latin America Political Culture and Security

    The study of Latin American with an emphasis on understanding the different political cultures and security issues across the region. Emphases will focus on individual domestic concerns, international positions, national security/economic interests, and alliances/conflicts between countries within and beyond the region. This intensive course adds to the upper-level Comparative Politics section of the program and allows for the development of a specific regional specialization, which is advantageous to the overall program objectives and future career opportunities.
    Course Syllabus

  • PS 420 Middle East Political Culture and Security

    The study of the Middle East with an emphasis on understanding the different political cultures and security issues across the region. Emphases will focus on individual domestic concerns, international positions, national security/economics interests, and alliances/conflicts between countries within and beyond the region. Particular attention is paid to non-state, transnational security threats and the interplay between secular and religious factions across the entire region. This intensive course adds to the upper-level Comparative Politics section of the program and allows for the development of a specific regional specialization, which is advantageous to the overall program objectives and future career opportunities.
    Course Syllabus

  • PS 421 Transformative Global Interdependence

    This course analyzes from a global perspective the causes, nature, and effects of globalization and how the world is becoming more interconnected and interdependent across all levels: international, national, local, and personal. Topics include compelling contemporary issues with a focus on the economic, political, social and cultural impacts. The course also includes the application of ethical principles in guiding solutions with the challenges that face our society and world and an emphasis on processing and producing primary source and original scholarship material.

  • PS 500 National Security, Transnational Interests

    This course examines the application of national security into the global arena and how complicated transnational threats represent unique dangers to American interests.
    Course Syllabus

  • PS 505 Comparative Intelligence Cultures

    Examines in comparative perspective the intelligence communities of various important states around the globe, including both allies and adversaries of the U.S.
    Course Syllabus

  • PS 510 Post-Conflict Politics: Peacekeeping and Peacebuilding

    This course examines how and what happens when states fail, the challenges and debates surrounding rebuilding conflict-ridden states, the methods available to achieve such objectives, and the criticisms and opponents of peacekeeping. Analyzing what is arguably the chief producer of conflict in the 21st century will be a major element of the course, considering the problems of managing and overcoming internal unrest, economic instability, and political corruption.
    Course Syllabus

  • PS 515 Comparative Foreign Policy

    This course defines, analyzes, and compares foreign policies in global perspective. It will examine internal and external factors that influence and complicate the formation of foreign policy as well as consider the various norms and theories that exist about foreign policy construction within the global environment. Finally, numerous case studies will be reviewed to examine in detail how there is divergence and variety across states and regions.
    Course Syllabus

  • PS 605 Green Security: Eco-conflict and its Challenges

    Examines how ecological and environmental issues are becoming ever more centered as political security issues for the global community and how the future of conflict may be founded upon deficits and scarcities within this area.
    Course Syllabus

  • PS 610 Hard and Soft Power: Balancing Hawks and Doves

    This course examines hard and soft power as concepts, theories, and consequential implications in global politics. It will estimate the applications of diplomatic and military strength and the proper context and applicability of each in given complex foreign dilemmas.
    Course Syllabus

  • PS 615 Political Islam and Terrorism: Understanding Martyrs and Messiahs

    This course examines the underlying philosophy behind the most prominent terrorist groups at the international level and the controversies and contradictions entailed within said groups. Analyzing the philosophy of jihad and the logic informing the decision to engage in suicide terrorism will be a major element of the course. The future of global Islam and potential trends emerging from the Islamic community will be considered.
    Course Syllabus

  • PS 620 Transnational Crime and Corruption: The Dark Side of Globalization

    This course examines the complexity of international political economy, its manipulation, misuse, and role in the elevation, continuation, and worsening of conflict around the globe.
    Course Syllabus

  • PS 625 Analyzing Anti-Americanism

    This course examines the various and diverse forms, philosophies, and political arguments made around the globe for going against American policy and interest. It will analyze the different theoretical approaches used to study anti-Americanism and delve into the various international and domestic factors impacting the phenomenon.
    Course Syllabus

  • PS 633 Strategic Deterrence: Past, Present, and Future

    This course examines deterrence in a comprehensive fashion, giving not only an historical grounding in the concept but also its evolution and likely transformation into the future as it applies to American interests.
    Course Syllabus

  • PS 636 Deterring the Enemy: Case Studies in Strategic Deterrence

    Examines the successes and failures within deterrence by exposing students to case studies and drawing conclusions as to the future for global stability and workable peace.
    Course Syllabus

  • PS 639 Cyberwar and Cyberdeterrence

    This course presents an examination of the arena of national security that meshes high-technology with traditional concerns of war and peace. Topics include war and deterrence in the cyber realm, attribution, threat assessment, retaliation, and offensive and defensive capabilities. Discussion also includes global politics related to cyber activity, and ethical issues linked to privacy, civil rights, national security and national defense.
    Course Syllabus

  • PS 650 Democracy, Ethnicity, and Development in Africa

    This course examines the complex, intriguing, and frustrating continent of Africa. Independence and democracy have been accompanied by revolts and mass atrocities; global development and aid has coincided with poverty and famine; the rule of law has been offset by human rights abuses and authoritarian outrages. All of these issues will be covered so as to document the present condition and future trajectory of Africa going forward into the 21st century.
    Course Syllabus

  • PS 660 Democracy, Political Economy, and Human Rights across Asia

    This course examines Asia from the perspectives of democracy, political economy, and human rights. It will assess how political and economic factors in the region impact not only individual states, but also transnational relations with other regions like North America and the European Union. How the region’s ongoing economic and political transformation influences governance will be examined. How power interplays with other states on issues pertaining to conflict and human rights will be important. Finally, the course will look at all of these issues from a theoretical and philosophical perspective, asking if culture impacts some of the variations.
    Course Syllabus

  • PS 690 Democracy, Gender, and Reform Across the Middle East

    This course examines the greater Middle East (from Morocco to Iran), aiming to expose the issues of democratization, gender relations, and economic/political reform. It will analyze various democratization projects ongoing across the region, comparing similarities and divergence along with strengths and weaknesses. The evolving and complicated role of women in this transformation will be important, across economic, political, and cultural lines.
    Course Syllabus

  • PY 101 Introduction to Psychology

    Introduction to the scientific foundations of the study of behavior and a survey of basic topics of psychology such as sensation and perception, the brain and nervous system, learning and memory, language and thinking, intelligence, motivation, emotions, personality, development, stress, and abnormal behavior. This course is a prerequisite for all other courses in Psychology except PY 200, PY 211, PY 222 and PY 250 or HS 250 or MA 240.
    Course Syllabus

  • PY 200 Careers in Psychology

    This course is an introduction to the wide variety of careers available to students majoring in psychology. Topics will include, but not be limited to: writing resumes and cover letters, applying to graduate/professional programs, and issues important in deciding upon an area of specialization. Students will learn about the various careers in psychology through presentations with professionals in the field and exploring information available on Internet sites, such as that of the American Psychological Association (1 credit hr)
    Course Syllabus

  • PY 211 Human Development

    This course will present the principles of human growth and development from conception to death. Topics to be included in the course are methods of child study, consideration of individual differences, and analysis of patterns and sequences of development.
    Course Syllabus

  • PY 222 Human Sexuality

    Consideration of biological, cultural, developmental, and psychological aspects of human sexuality, emphasizing class discussion of relevant issues. Among topics covered are AIDS, romantic love, sexual practices, and sexual orientation.
    Course Syllabus

  • PY 235 Fundamentals of Counseling

    Introduction to concepts and theories of counseling with special attention to multi-cultural, gender, and developmental issues. Emphasis on improving listening and attending skills. Prerequisite: PY 101
    Course Syllabus

  • PY 250 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences

    This course is an introduction to and application of statistics and research designs used in experimental psychological research. Statistical software will be used to analyze psychological data collected by the students using both descriptive and inferential statistics. Specific types of statistical tests include: measures of central tendency and variability, correlation, multiple regression, z-tests, t-tests for both independent and correlated samples, analysis of variance/covariance, and various non-parametric tests. Prerequisite: MA 101 or higher
    Course Syllabus

  • PY 301 Personality Theory

    This course covers major psychodynamic, behaviorist, trait, humanist, and cognitive theories of personality. Situational and biological influences, traits and cognition, life stories, psychobiography, and other contemporary issues are discussed. Application of personality theory to the understanding of individual lives is encouraged. Prerequisite: PY 101
    Course Syllabus

  • PY 311 Abnormal Psychology

    This course presents the major theoretical and therapeutic approaches to psychological disorder. The classification, origin, description, and treatment of the chief psychiatric problems are included. Prerequisite: PY 101
    Course Syllabus

  • PY 320 Human Memory and Cognition

    Addresses the ways in which people gain knowledge about their world and about self. Topics covered include: memory and forgetting, language, thought processes, and creativity. Prerequisite: PY 101
    Course Syllabus

  • PY 322 Psychological Assessment

    This course introduces concepts of testing and measurement. Students will examine a variety of psychological tests, learn basics of measurement statistics, and consider assessment approaches such as rating scales and behavior observation. Prerequisites: PY 101 and PY 250 or HS 250 or MA 240 (PY 250 or HS 250 or MA 240 may be taken concurrently).
    Course Syllabus

  • PY 340 Culture and Psychology

    Covers major concepts and research of cross-cultural psychology, including cross-cultural aspects of ethnocentrism, developmental processes, gender differences, emotion, language, personality, and other topics. Applications of cross-cultural knowledge to understanding one’s own culture and the effects of culture on individual lives are included. Prerequisite: PY 101
    Course Syllabus

  • PY 353 Introduction to Psychological Research

    Examination of research design issues in psychology and related disciplines with emphasis on accurate reading of published articles. Students will write a research proposal including a literature review, an operationally stated hypothesis, and data gathering procedures. Students continuing on to PY 354 Experimental Psychology carry out their research proposal. Enhancements for PY 353 provide instruction in American Psychological Association manuscript style. Prerequisites: PY 101 and PY 250 or HS 250 or MA 240 (PY 250 or HS 250 or MA 240 may be taken concurrently)
    Course Syllabus

  • PY 354 Experimental Psychology

    Study and application of experimental techniques for investigating psychological issues. Students replicate experiments or design their own investigations, write experimental reports, and use computerized statistical analysis. Prerequisites: PY 101, PY 250 or HS 250 or MA 240, and PY 353. (3 credit hrs lecture; 1 credit hr lab)
    Course Syllabus

  • PY 368 Learning Theory

    Emphasizes the development of theoretical approaches to learning, as well as applications of behavioral learning principles in applied contexts. The principles of classical conditioning, instrumental conditioning, and social learning theory will be investigated in the course. The course will also present how learning principles are used in such areas as child management, interpersonal communication, and self-control. Prerequisite: PY 101
    Course Syllabus

  • PY 371 Biological Psychology

    Study of biological influences on human behavior and mental processes. Includes a survey of brain and nervous system anatomy and how researchers learn about functions of these systems in relation to behavior. Emphasis on normal development, adaptation, and learning but a variety of syndromes and problems also are included. Study of Biology or Anatomy and Physiology are helpful but not required. Prerequisite: PY 101
    Course Syllabus

  • PY 375 History of Psychology

    This course presents the development of psychology in the history of the Western world. Among the topics it includes are the philosophical basis of modern psychology, the founders of psychology, and development of major theories and content areas. Prerequisite: PY 101
    Course Syllabus

  • PY 382 Psychology of Women

    Investigation of differences and similarities in psychological functioning between women and men, including the influence of major life events occurring only in women (e.g. menstruation, pregnancy) on psychological functioning. Prerequisite: PY 101
    Course Syllabus

  • PY 399 Topics in Psychology

    In-depth exploration of particular topics of psychological interest not treated or treated only briefly in other psychology courses. Specific titles of courses offered under this heading are listed in the course selection for the sessions in which they are offered. Prerequisite: PY 101

  • PY 400 Advanced Studies in Psychology

    Capstone course for psychology majors focusing on the discussion and analysis of significant issues, methods, and bodies of knowledge in psychology. Students will be responsible for the content and direction of the course under the guidance of the instructor. Prerequisites: PY 101, PY 250 or HS 250 or MA 240, PY 353, and six additional hours of upper-level psychology, or permission of instructor.
    Course Syllabus

  • PY 414 Enterprise Information Intelligence

    This course provides an integrative foundation in the field of enterprise information intelligence at the tactical, operational, and strategic levels. Topics such as the functional areas of enterprise intelligence, developing skills applicable to real-world issues and solutions, business process analysis and design will be covered, along with other topics relevant to the field of information intelligence.

  • PY 444 Psychology and Religion

    Presents psychological theories and research on religious belief and practices in a seminar format. Insights of Freud, Jung, James, Allport, and others are discussed in a manner respectful of both Western and Eastern spirituality. The course is not offered every year. Prerequisite: PY 101
    Course Syllabus

  • PY 445 Special Readings in Psychology

    An opportunity to study topics of personal or professional interest not covered, or covered in a limited way, in regular courses. Prerequisites: Psychology major and permission of instructor (Credit arranged individually—maximum of 6 credit hrs)
    Course Syllabus

  • PY 450 Research

    Provides an opportunity to conduct research in an area of psychology of interest to the student. Research is based upon ideas of the student and/or the instructor. Because original research may take more than one semester, the course may be repeated once for credit for a maximum of six credit hours. Prerequisites: Psychology major, PY 250 or HS 250 or MA 240, PY 353, PY 354, and permission of instructor
    Course Syllabus

  • RCBC 305 Communicating in the Enterprise

    This course focuses on the practical application of communication within the enterprise. Emphasis will be placed on learning how to write, speak, and act in the enterprise, including an introduction to professional presentations.

  • RCBC 310 Foundations of Business Communication

    This course focuses on the practical application of business communication. Emphasis will be placed on learning the different types of writing required in the modern business environment including an introduction to professional presentations.
    Course Syllabus

  • RCBC 315 Solving Problems in the Enterprise

    This course focuses on the application of concepts to solve enterprise problems. Emphasis is placed on identifying and analyzing weaknesses and threats, and investigating potential responses and solutions.

  • RCBC 320 Decision Making in a Business Environment

    This course focuses on the knowledge needed to understand and apply processes for making business decisions. Emphasis is placed on the role of the pillars of capitalism as the underlying assumptions for making economic decisions in the U.S. Emphasis will also be placed on developing critical thinking skills.
    Course Syllabus

  • RCBC 325 Formulating Data-Driven Decisions

    This course focuses on the skills needed to produce and understand how data is used in the enterprise. Emphasis is placed on demonstrating a systematic and methodical approach to decision-making.

  • RCBC 330 Foundations of Fiscal Management

    This course focuses on the practical application of accounting concepts and processes and financial data analysis. The importance of the management of business information systems will also be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on how these basic concepts are used in today’s global business environment.
    Course Syllabus

  • RCBC 335 Enterprise Economic Management

    This course focuses on the analysis and measures for managing the economic health of the enterprise. Focus will be placed on utilizing business information systems in a global context.

  • RCBC 340 Global Business Management

    This course is an overview of global management theory and practices. Management strategies for operations and marketing in a global economy are examined. Economic theory is also examined as it relates to these strategies. Also included are team work and communication skills.
    Course Syllabus

  • RCBC 345 Resource and Risk Management

    This course focuses on the allocation of enterprise resources when and where they are needed. Emphasis will be placed on how to integrate all facets of the enterprise for greater efficiency and productivity.

  • RCBC 355 Managing the Global Enterprise

    This course focuses on the inherent issues of the modern global enterprise. Economic and operational influences will be examined in relation to overall strategic management in the enterprise.

  • RMGT 301 Retail Management Foundations

    Emphasis is placed on the retail manager’s role in building sales and profitability as well as key drivers affecting customer satisfaction and loyalty.
    Course Syllabus

  • RMGT 305 Merchandising

    Analysis of the merchandising process including interpretation of product performance data, inventory management systems and logistics. Additional focus is placed on the comparative analysis of merchandising plans, managing margins and inventory turns and overall financial growth strategy.
    Course Syllabus

  • RMGT 311 Selling and Service in Retail Management

    Examination of service and selling models in various retail industry types. Included is the application of best retail leadership practices to align service and sales team performance with established organizational performance benchmarks.
    Course Syllabus

  • RMGT 321 Human Resources and Store Operations

    Application of hiring and retention strategies to support the talent acquisition and management. Emphasis is placed on analyzing a store’s operating budget and profit and loss statement in order to implement staffing plans with measurable performance expectations.
    Course Syllabus

  • RMGT 341 Financial Analysis and Retail Analytics

    Analysis of financial reports used to assess store and company performance. Included is the creation and analysis of financials including proficiency in selecting and utilizing calculations necessary to measure and report the financial performance.
    Course Syllabus

  • RMGT 401 Strategies and Plans for Retail Operations

    Evaluation of factors driving retail strategy to include how seasonal and annual sales goals shape marketing plans, drive sales performance and enhance the consumer value proposition.
    Course Syllabus

  • RMGT 411 Concepts and Principles for Retail Operations

    Application of core merchant concepts to include the buying process, buying strategies and value chain control to enhance store, chain and overall organizational performance.
    Course Syllabus

  • RMGT 421 Performance Analysis

    Focus is placed on developing actionable plans in response to retail performance analysis and approaches to effective plan execution.
    Course Syllabus

  • RMGT 441 Leading a Retail Team

    Emphasis is placed on implementing leadership strategies to align the retail organization’s human capital to it strategic goals and customer perspective. Included is the development of techniques to promote the confidence and autonomy of retail team members, resulting in effective delegation and innovation by the manager.
    Course Syllabus

  • SCLM 309 Foundations of Supply Chain Communication

    This course focuses on the practical application of business communication. Emphasis will be placed on learning the different types of writing required in the modern business environment including an introduction to professional presentations. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.

  • SCLM 319 Decision Making in a Global Environment

    This course focuses on the knowledge needed to understand and apply processes for making business decisions. Emphasis is placed on the role of the pillars of capitalism as the underlying assumptions for making economic decisions in the U.S. Emphasis will also be placed on developing critical thinking skills. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.

  • SCLM 329 Fiscal Management for Supply Chain Management

    This course focuses on the practical application of accounting concepts and processes and financial data analysis. The importance of the management of business information systems will also be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on how these basic concepts are used in today’s global business environment. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.

  • SCLM 410 Introduction to Supply Chain Management and Logistics

    This course provides an examination of supply chain and logistics management concepts from both U.S. and global perspectives. Key logistics and supply chain activities are explored with an emphasis on the opportunities that can be realized through effective and innovative supply chain and logistics management. The pros and cons of global sourcing are also explored as a foundation for understanding the supply chain management and logistics strategies. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the College of Business’ Bachelor of Science in Supply Chain and Logistics Management accelerated degree completion program and successful completion of RCBC 310, RCBC 320, RCBC 330, and RCBC 340
    Course Syllabus

  • SCLM 420 Global Logistics and Transportation

    This course addresses a variety of issues involved in the logistics and transportation components of the global supply chain. Topics also covered include an examination of how government and legal actions and security issues affect the transportation and logistics operations and the associated economics. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the College of Business’ Bachelor of Science in Supply Chain and Logistics Management accelerated degree completion program and successful completion of RCBC 310, RCBC 320, RCBC 330, and RCBC 340
    Course Syllabus

  • SCLM 426 Management and the International Organization

    This course is an overview of global management theory and organizational practices. Management strategies for operations and marketing in a global economy are examined. Organizational behavior and economic theory is also examined as it relates to these strategies. Also included are team work and communication skills. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.

  • SCLM 430 Business Logistics Systems Analysis

    This course explores a variety of analytical techniques and information technology to supply chain and logistics management operations. The course will provide opportunities to analyze and apply the appropriate techniques to solve supply chain management and logistics questions. A variety of concepts such as inventory management, productivity, quality, capacity management, forecasting and information technology methods are examined. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the College of Business’ Bachelor of Science in Supply Chain and Logistics Management accelerated degree completion program and successful completion of RCBC 310, RCBC 320, RCBC 330, and RCBC 340
    Course Syllabus

  • SCLM 436 Introduction to Supply Chain and Logistics Management

    This course provides an examination of supply chain and logistics management concepts from both U.S. and global perspectives. Key logistics and supply chain activities are explored with an emphasis on the opportunities that can be realized through effective and innovative supply chain and logistics management. The pros and cons of global sourcing are also explored as a foundation for understanding the supply chain management and logistics strategies. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.

  • SCLM 440 Supply Chain Management Financial, Economics, Capital, Cash and Legal Considerations

    This course provides an understanding of the interdependencies between the supply chain and the economic, financial, cash and capital performance of the firm. Economic and pricing aspects of various transportation modes are also examined. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the College of Business’ Bachelor of Science in Supply Chain and Logistics Management accelerated degree completion program and successful completion of RCBC 310, RCBC 320, RCBC 330, RCBC 340, SCLM 410, 420, and 430
    Course Syllabus

  • SCLM 446 Global Logistics and Transportation

    This course addresses a variety of issues involved in the logistics and transportation components of the global supply chain. Topics include an examination of how government and legal actions affect the transportation and logistics operations. The course also focuses on operational security issues. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.

  • SCLM 456 Business Logistics Systems Analysis

    This course explores a variety of analytical techniques and information technologies used in supply chain and logistics management operations. The course will provide opportunities to analyze and apply the appropriate techniques to solve supply chain management and logistics problems. A variety of concepts such as inventory management, productivity, quality, capacity management, forecasting are examined using information technology. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.

  • SCLM 466 Supply Chain Management Financial, Economics, Capital, Cash and Legal Considerations

    This course integrates the supply chain operations of the firm. The course examines how the supply chain affects the capital, cash, financial, and economic performance of the firm. Economic and pricing aspects of various transportation modes are also examined. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.

  • SCLM 476 Capstone and Public Relations

    Students will demonstrate competency as a manager in the professional field of Supply Chain Logistics Management by conducting an analysis of a topic related to their SCLM career. Using the results of this analysis the student will then prepare a professionally written report and oral presentation of their findings. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a College of Business accelerated degree completion program.

  • SM 101 Introduction to Sports Management

    This course is designed to provide students an overview of the sport management industry and of the issues sport organizations face. Students will be introduced to various career opportunities within the sport industry and have the opportunity to explore those careers further through off-campus experiences.
    Course Syllabus

  • SM 231 Sports Communication

    This course examines the basic knowledge, skills, and understanding of the methods of communication in the world of sport. Applied activities in personal communication, organizational communication, public relations and the media place an emphasis on being an effective communicator within the high school, university or professional sport setting.
    Course Syllabus

  • SM 349 Sports Public Relations and Fundraising

    This course provides students with the basic knowledge and understanding of public relations and fundraising within the sport world. Applied activities give students an opportunity to develop skills related to public relations and fundraising within the high school, university, private and public sport settings.
    Course Syllabus

  • SM 361 Contemporary Issues in Sports

    This course is designed to explore the role sport plays in society by examining a variety of issues in sport. Past and present societal impacts will be investigated in order to better understand the role sport plays in our current culture and how sport may affect society in the future.
    Course Syllabus

  • SM 365 Sports Law

    This course examines laws relevant to sport managers and those pursuing careers within health and physical performance fields. An examination of the legal system and laws affecting sport and recreational activities will be provided in a manner understandable to those involved in the sport, fitness or health industries.
    Course Syllabus

  • SM 404 Sports Management

    This course provides students with the basic theories, techniques, and knowledge related to management within the sport industry, including the functions of planning, organizing, leading and controlling. Applied activities give students an opportunity to develop practical skills which can be utilized to manage within the sport industry. Prerequisite: SM101 or BA 232
    Course Syllabus

  • SM 407 Sports Marketing

    This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of sport marketing. Current sport marketing concepts and practical applications including the functions of research, segmentation, strategy and implementation are covered. Development of a sales marketing plan for a sport product or organization is included. Prerequisite: SM101 or BA 232 or BA 252
    Course Syllabus

  • SM 461 Sports Facility Management

    This course addresses principles of sport facility management and practical problem solving required of professionals for common challenges related to usage and success. The course will include an in-depth analysis of facility administration, facility systems, and long-term development. Prerequisite: SM101 or BA 232
    Course Syllabus

  • SM 470 Sports Finance

    This course covers basic financial management principles, concepts and techniques encountered within the sport industry. Students have the opportunity to apply this knowledge to various segments within the sport industry in order to gain a deeper understanding of financial management. Prerequisites: SM101 or BA 232, and AC205
    Course Syllabus

  • SMGT 305 Theory and Practice of Security

    This course will provide a foundation and overview of the diverse field of security. The focus of the course will be on the different components of security management and the concepts and theory in the field of security.
    Course Syllabus

  • SMGT 315 The American Criminal and Civil Legal Systems

    This course will provide an examination of the Constitutional underpinnings of criminal and civil law as it applies to the field of security. Special focus will be devoted to an overview of the American court system, specific elements of crime, the operation of civil jurisprudence, and a review of the policies and procedures that influence law in America.
    Course Syllabus