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My learning experience was valuable to me in the sense that I was able to apply real world application to my learning. There were countless times in both degree programs where I was able to apply what I was learning to my life.

Kirk D. S.
Shakopee, MN
Criminal Justice

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Master of Science in Human Services (MS)

Curriculum

(Click a course name below to view course details)

Foundation Courses

  • HS 500 Helping Relationships

    This course guides students through the core elements of the helping relationship process. The major focus of this course is on the attending behaviors and interviewing skills utilized in the helping relationship. This course will also orient you to the graduate school process as well as encourage the development of a professional mindset, counselor characteristics, and an attitude of lifelong learning as a human service professional.

  • HS 510 Research Methods in Human Services

    In this course students will explore research models in the human services. Standard research design issues and procedures will be addressed including experimental, program evaluation, quasi-experimental, qualitative, and case study designs. Skills in reading empirical reports, evaluating the quality of such reports, and integrating research evidence into practice will be emphasized.
    University Syllabus

  • HS 513 Theories of Psychopathology

    This course will explore evidence-based conceptualizations of both normal and disordered mental states, together with an examination of the etiology, development, manifestation, and potential treatment of mental disorders in infants, children, adolescents, and adults.

  • HS 515 Professional Orientation, Ethics, and Legal Issues

    This course provides an opportunity for students to consider theoretical and practical ethical standards for working with individuals in a variety of human service settings. Students will self-assess their values and professionalism and prepare for future professional growth in a variety of counselor roles including supervision, advocacy, and crisis response. Emphasis will be on ethical codes of professional organizations and credentialing bodies relevant to mental health counseling.
    University Syllabus

  • HS 528 Applied Counseling Theory

    This course focuses on learning to integrate insights and principles from counseling theories to clinical applications commonly encountered in human services roles. Content includes major traditional counseling theories, including psychoanalytic, cognitive/behavioral, humanistic/ existential, and family systems. Contemporary approaches include Dialectical Behavior Therapy, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, and Functional Analytic Psychotherapy. Students learn to evaluate selected research that supports and enhances the validity and application of each theory, and they gain insights into how to apply each theory in a manner appropriate to the complexity of problems presented by clients. Multi- and cross-cultural implications and adaptations are addressed, as well as ethical and risk assessment methods. This course provides important preparation for internship experiences.
    University Syllabus

Framework Courses

  • HS 516 DSM Diagnosis for Children, Adolescents, and Adults

    The taxonomy and nosology of psychopathology will be reviewed using the structure of the current edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM); examining the disorders of infancy, childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Normal, developmental, stress induced, and pathological states will be explored. The emphasis will be placed upon the process of differential diagnosis for the purposes of case formulation, treatment planning, and/or referral along the continuum of care using the multiaxial model. Prerequisite: Foundation Courses.

  • HS 521 Human Growth and Development

    This course provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the nature and needs of persons at all the developmental levels and in multicultural contexts. Individual and family developmental theories and transitions, as well as theories of learning and personality development, including knowledge about neurobiological behavior will be emphasized. Knowledge about human behavior as it relates to developmental crises, traumacausing events, psychopathology, disability, and other factors that influence normal and abnormal behavior will be presented. Theories and etiology of addictions, knowledge about assisting optimal development and wellness, and resilience across the life span will be explored. A framework for understanding and developing interventions for extraordinary capabilities will be introduced.
    University Syllabus

  • HS 524 Group Work: Dynamics and Facilitation

    This course provides students with a theoretical and experiential understanding of group work, including group types, purposes, dynamics, developmental stages, theories, methods, skills, and approaches to practice as a professional counselor in a multicultural society. The principles of group dynamics, group facilitation styles and approaches, theories and methods of group counseling provide the framework for this course. In addition, a workshop environment will be used to demonstrate techniques and to ensure individual skill development. Students develop ability to assess how their own methods and the dynamics of group interact to facilitate cognitive, emotional, and behavioral change. Students will be provided with at least 10 hours of group experience, with at least one hour of group facilitation experience. Prerequisite: Foundation Courses.
    University Syllabus

  • HS 531 Assessment

    Introduces the development of standardized and nonstandardized assessment, including behavioral observation, clinical interviewing, and a variety of referenced instrumentation. Students will learn the basics of statistics applied to testing and measurement theory and applications. Special attention will be given to issues of validity and reliability, paying special attention to concerns regarding ethics and applications to multicultural populations. Learning will focus on the use and interpretation of common assessment methods. Prerequisite: Foundation Courses.
    University Syllabus

  • HS 538 Social and Cultural Diversity

    This course addresses cultural, social, religious, and economic factors applicable to cultural, ethnic, and minority populations; both from the perspective of the culturally diverse client, and the counselor. Experiential methods of learning will be emphasized, including the development of self-awareness in the counselor. Traditional counseling theories, as well as more recent approaches to counseling diverse groups, will be analyzed for ethical and practical implications. The counselor’s role in addressing advocacy and justice will be explored. Prerequisite: Foundation Courses.
    University Syllabus

  • HS 546 Family Therapy

    The goal of this course is to help students comprehend the theoretical concepts and intervention techniques in the field of family therapy. Patterns of developmental and societal changes that impact families will also be studied, including addictions and trauma-causing events. Theories and models of couple and family resilience, as well as optimal development and wellness over the family life span will be introduced. Knowledge of a systems perspective which will provide an understanding of family and other systems theories and models of family and related interventions will be emphasized. Prerequisite: Foundation Courses.
    University Syllabus

  • HS 547 Health Psychology Applications

    This course will introduce students to the relationships between human behavior, emotional functioning, and physical health. The focus is on issues that human service providers are likely to observe in their professional work with a variety of client populations. Assessment and treatment of obesity, smoking, high-risk sexual behavior, alcohol abuse, and coping with chronic illnesses will be addressed. The individual and societal impact of these problems will be reviewed, as well as how human service providers can contribute to the prevention of health problems caused or exacerbated by behavioral choices.
    University Syllabus

  • HS 585 Career Development

    This course introduces students to the theories of career development as well as the assessment tools and counselor practices associated with helping clients achieve congruence in their career development pattern. Students will explore interrelationships between factors such as age, gender, family, life roles, and multicultural issues as they relate to career and educational planning. Prerequisite: Foundation and Framework Courses.

  • HS 610 Counseling Practices

    This course integrates the knowledge and skills needed for effective counseling, including interviewing, clinical data gathering, clinical recording, diagnosis, treatment planning along the continuum of care, and selfawareness, especially to prepare for the required internships. This will also include an examination of the clinical counselor as a member of a multidisciplinary team, relationship with internal and external constituencies, and the professional issues of licensing, certification, and liability. Wellness and prevention will be included in the consideration of client issues, as well as crisis intervention and risk management. Particular emphasis will be placed on therapeutic rapport, client selfdisclosure and managing blocks to the counseling process. Prerequisite: Foundation and Framework Courses.
    University Syllabus

  • HS 615 Clinical Internship

    Together with HS 620, this course is designed to meet the needs of students in the Community Counseling (48-credit hour) and Mental Health Counseling (60-credit hour) programs It is an opportunity for students to apply their knowledge in a supervised Mental Health Practitioner context. The site supervisor for the required 300 clock hours (60% “direct”) must be licensed and the setting must involve an appropriate range of clinical services. The intern will be provided a practicum experience during the initial 100 clock hours (of the 300) in order to meet regulatory requirements for appropriate orientation to mental health work as an intern. During the course, students will be required to participate in an online site designed to provide learning experiences and sharing with peers about internship experiences. Students will be required to prepare a clinical reasoning paper based on a case and to prepare a self-assessment report that summarizes growth in personal and professional skills. The final evaluation from the site supervisor will be a substantial component of the course grade. Prerequisites: HS515, HS616 or HS519, HS528, HS610 or permission of instructor; students must provide proof of professional liability insurance.
    University Syllabus

  • HS 620 Advanced Clinical Internship

    Together with HS 615, this course is designed to meet the needs of students in the Community Counseling (48-credit hour) and Mental Health Counseling (60-credit hour) programs. It is an opportunity for students to apply their knowledge in a supervised Mental Health Practitioner context. Emphasis is on extending and deepening clinical experiences from the previous internship and learning to proactively benefit from supervision. The site supervisor for the required 300 clock hours (60% “direct”) must be licensed and the setting must involve an appropriate range of clinical services. During the course, students will be required to participate in an online site designed to provide learning experiences and sharing with peers about internship experiences. Students will be required to prepare a clinical reasoning paper based on a case and to prepare a self-assessment report that summarizes growth in personal and professional skills. The final evaluation from the site supervisor will be a substantial component of the course grade. Prerequisites: HS615 or permission of instructor; students must provide proof of professional liability insurance.
    University Syllabus

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