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Finance – Strategic Leadership of Value & Risk Degree - Master of Science

Curriculum

The program presents financial management as a key strategic discipline networking within a broad range of stakeholders in a dynamic international marketplace to allocate resources in a manner that maximizes economic, social and organizational value. The curriculum is designed to develop business leaders' enterprise-wide financial decision making skills and insights by focusing on the application of value optimization, enterprise risk management and business strategy in a holistic context. Students study a broad range of financial and business issues, perspectives and decisions that managers and executives face within a firm, a financial intermediary, and/or other financial entity. The program presents tools and applications necessary to add value within the exciting and dynamic field of financial management in today's global business environment.

Major Requirements (36 credit hours)

Module 1 Component = 4 courses covering core concepts regarding the nature of the firm, financial statements and accounting concepts, economic business conditions, and analysis methods. These concepts provide a foundation for financial and business decision making and leadership.

Module 2 Component = 6 courses covering core concepts, tools and applications regarding financial markets and capital formation, valuation, enterprise risk management, investments and strategic business and financial leadership.

Electives Component = 2 courses = interdisciplinary graduate courses.

Pre-requisites: Business executive / finance career experience or aspiration; knowledge and abilities in accounting basics (eg MBA 600), algebra, Excel/Word/PPT; aptitude in and comfort level with quantitative analysis.

Module 1 Courses:

(Click a course name below to view course details)

  • MSF 605 Nature of the Firm: Governance, Sustainability, and Compliance

    This course engages students in an understanding and discussion of the history, development, and purpose of the modern firm in an international context. Topics include the historical development of limited liability, the legal personality of the firm, governance and the role and perspective of stakeholders. The course covers modern theories of the nature of the firm and their impact on financing the Firm. The course introduces students to the nature of capital, capital creation, corporate social responsibility, and management as it relates to the perspectives of the various stakeholders in the Firm. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing
    University Syllabus

  • MSF 610 Financial Statement Analysis in Global Markets

    This course focuses on the analysis and evaluation of the key financial statements—Income Statement, Balance Sheet, and Cash Flow Statement. The emphasis is on understanding the components of each statement. Topics include financial statements, financial ratio analysis and development, common size statements, pro-forma non-GAAP statements, EBITDA, accounting principles (matching and revenue recognition, accruals, etc.). Emphasis is on understanding the Accounting assumptions and principles under GAAP and IFRS that underlie the reported data. In addition, certain tax topics will be covered that relate to and should be considered when making financial decisions within for-profit organizations. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing
    University Syllabus

  • MSF 615 Business Conditions in Global Markets

    This course addresses the macroeconomic environment and its impact on decisions faced by the firm. Topics include the business cycle, trade and capital flows, foreign exchange, international yield curves, and the impact of fiscal, monetary, and tax policy in the international framework. Students are introduced to the study, measurement, and use of economic indicators available internationally to gauge the current state and trend of international business conditions. The focus is to understand how economic conditions influence decision making of an organization. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing
    University Syllabus

  • MSF 620 Applied Methods of Analysis for Problem Solving and Decision Making

    This course presents qualitative and quantitative methods and tools for decision makers to analyze data and solve problems. The course discusses relevant and practical statistical concepts. The course emphasizes the functionality of spreadsheets for the effective analysis and presentation of problems and solutions. Topics include data display, visualization and analysis; central tendency and distribution; expected values, variance, standard deviation, covariance, correlations, probability, regression basics, decision trees, scenario and sensitivity analysis; Monte Carlo modeling, and the strategic base concepts of Game Theory. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing
    University Syllabus

Module 2 Courses:

(Click a course name below to view course details)

  • MSF 625 Financial Markets: Capital Sources, Liquidity and Risk

    This course addresses the capital formation alternatives and decisions related to the capital structure of the firm and the value of the firm. Topics include qualitative and quantitative nature of financial markets; underwriting processes; alternative sources of capital and capital structure; money and capital markets; loans and covenants; bankruptcy risk; venture capital; private equity; cost of capital; and management of cash and liquidity. Prerequisites: MSF 605, 610, 615, and 620
    University Syllabus

  • MSF 630 Valuation I – Capital Budgeting and Foundations of Valuation

    This course investigates the foundations of valuation analysis and why valuation is central to financial decision making and business leadership strategies. The focus is on applying valuation analysis to capital budgeting decisions to enhance organizational value. Topics include TVM foundations, capital budgeting foundations; cash flow analysis; real option analysis; lease analysis; intangible valuation analysis; and uncertainty analysis. Prerequisites: MSF 610 and 620
    University Syllabus

  • MSF 635 Valuation II – Bond, Equity and Firm Valuation Analysis

    This course further advances students’ proficiency in valuation analysis through applications of security and firm valuation principles. Topics include equity valuation; CAPM; efficient market implications (EMH); fixed income and bond valuation; merger/acquisition analysis; and international market issues. Prerequisites: MSF 610, 620, and 630
    University Syllabus

  • MSF 640 Enterprise Risk Management in Global Markets

    This course focuses on understanding and mastering the core concepts involved in the process of enterprise risk management namely identifying, characterizing, analyzing and managing enterprise risk in a global market. The course provides a framework for a strategic and holistic analysis of enterprise risk based on a portfolio view of the firm. The focus is on qualitative issues in developing a broad understanding of enterprise risk and its core components – strategic, operational, financial, hazard, and emerging risks - as they relate to the objectives of the firm. Prerequisite: MSF 625
    University Syllabus

  • MSF 645 Investments: Integration of Markets, Enterprise Risk and Investments for Value Optimization

    This course addresses core elements of investment strategies and portfolio management concepts of asset allocation relevant to the nature and risks of managing financial intermediaries as well as financial management within a firm. Topics include portfolio analysis; derivative securities; financial intermediaries [banks, mutual funds, etc.]; venture capital; private equity; hedge funds; mutual funds; duration; high yield analysis; regulatory agencies, roles, and frameworks [FDIC, FED, SEC, CFTC, international regulators-Central Banks], etc. Prerequisite: MSF 640
    University Syllabus

  • MSF 650 Leadership and Communication in Business: Holistic Financial Strategies for Value Optimization

    This course provides an integrating summary of the core elements of the program and solidifies the strategic leadership perspective of the finance discipline in networking and communicating with diverse internal and external stakeholders to maximize firm value within the financial, economic and political environments the firm operates in. Topics include project management, system analysis, causal loop analysis, emotional intelligence, capital development, business strategy, sustained growth and effective communication. Prerequisites: MSF 625, 630, 635, 640, and 645.
    University Syllabus

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