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Master of Arts in Leadership

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Master of Business Administration (MBA)

Click here for degree requirements if your class started prior to March 10, 2014.

Degree Information

Information about the Master in Business Administration

Spring 2012 marks the launch of the revitalized Master of Business Administration curriculum at Bellevue University. The revised MBA is now 39 credit hours which includes two, 3-credit electives. Please click here to read the Press Release outlining the new features of the MBA program.

Bellevue University's MBA is a 39-hour graduate program available online and in class. All students begin their program by taking MBA 605 Human Capital: Self-Development and Communication and MBA 606: Critical Thinking & Applied Problem Solving to frame their MBA experience. Concentration/elective courses are generally offered once a year. Therefore, it is best to plan out your entire program with your academic advisor shortly after you begin your first term so that you may sequence your courses appropriately.

Curriculum

Major Requirements

At least 33 graduate credit hours applying to your degree must be taken at Bellevue University. No undergraduate courses will count toward the MBA. Those students with a traditional Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Degree (BSBA or its equivalent) will generally have MBA 600: Survey of Accounting waived if they have requisite courses in financial and managerial accounting as well as an intermediate to advanced knowledge of Excel. These students may choose 9-credit hour Concentration as part of the 39-credit MBA.

Students without the requisite financial and managerial accounting and intermediate to advanced Excel experience are required to complete MBA 600: Survey of Accounting. The course may also be taken by students who have the requisite courses, but may wish to revisit accounting and spreadsheet/Excel concepts that will be used throughout the MBA program. Should students taking MBA 600 wish to add a Concentration to their MBA, the program would then be 42 or 45 credit hours.

MBA Core Requirements Preferred Order of Study Section

  • MBA 605 Human Capital: Self-Development and Communication

    This course explores the development of human capital, including self-diagnostics, learning management, cognitive and metacognitive strategies, and the acumen necessary to communicate with and influence various stakeholders in a complex and interconnected global business environment. Students will practice using knowledge gathering and knowledge sharing tools for effective decision making; and will begin to master business communication skills including writing, speaking and presenting. Prereq: Graduate Standing
    University Syllabus

  • MBA 606 Critical Thinking & Applied Problem Solving

    This course examines the use of critical thinking methods, mental models, and qualitative and quantitative decision making and problem solving methods to shape successful organizations. Emphasis is placed on the role of judgment development and how experience, research, knowledge, and group dynamics can lead to quality business analysis and shape effective decisions. Prereq: Graduate Standing
    University Syllabus

  • MBA 608 Capitalism & Economic Reasoning

    This course reviews the history of capitalism, with a focus on the modern implications of American Capitalism to business and policy decision-making today. It also explores competing systems and compares the economic, political, and personal freedoms that define our market-based system in relation to others. The course will use both focused and integrative analyses of key micro- and macroeconomic, accounting, finance, and marketing concepts, and their role in shaping the creation and growth of American business enterprises, and in defining and measuring their success. Students will begin the journey of learning how to reason like an economist and understand system impact in their analysis, decision making, and judgment making. Prereq: MBA 605 and MBA 606. For MSBAN students – No prerequisite required.
    University Syllabus

  • MBA 600 Survey of Accounting

    Survey of Accounting is designed to provide students with an overall understanding of the manner in which business gathers, processes and uses information. Students are introduced to basic accounting and computer concepts and procedures through case studies and computer projects. Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of basic accounting processes and principles, on data management in a computerized environment, and on the basic financial statements. Students are also expected to develop an appreciation of the needs for internal controls in a business. Issues relating to internal control procedures, computer security, privacy issues and ethics will be introduced through readings and case studies. Prereq: Graduate Standing
    University Syllabus

    • MBA 600 may be waived if the following courses or course equivalences can be demonstrated. Even with these requisite courses, a student may opt to take MBA 600.
    • AC 205 Financial Accounting

      This course is an introduction to accounting concepts and the elements of financial statements including basic accounting vocabulary and analysis of business transactions from an accounting viewpoint. Students will be required to recognize, record, and classify new accounting data. Emphasis is placed on corporate accounting. Introductory financial statement analysis and interpretation are also covered.
      University Syllabus

    • AC 206 Managerial Accounting

      Managerial accounting is designed to introduce the fundamentals of managerial accounting to both accounting and non-accounting majors. It covers accounting and management decision making in both short-term and long-term strategic situations. Students will be expected to explain and apply accounting concepts including basic costing and processes, cost classifications, responsibility accounting and ethical behavior of the managerial accountant. Prerequisite: AC 205
      University Syllabus

    • BA 222 Intermediate Computer Concepts and Applications

      This course is designed for College of Business students who have basic file management and office software skills. Course projects are designed for business problem solving and include document management, using spreadsheets for information processing, design and management of personal databases for automated data management, presentation, and integrating business communications. Prerequisite: Recommend prior computer knowledge

  • MBA 610 Applications of Data Analysis for Effective Decision Making

    This course is about the art of analyzing and summarizing data, and converting it into useful information for the purpose of solving business problems and making sound business decisions. Graphs, tables, number summaries, correlation, and regression are among common tools which enable a manager to explore patterns in the data and discover relationships among variables, all of which are major focus in this class. Additionally, students learn about random variables and various distributions, as well as their relevance to business decisions such as stock prices, waiting lines, inventory control, project management, and quality decisions. Finally, to put course content into perspective and demonstrate its relevance to the business environment, students learn specifically how to use time-series data and graphical tools to make forecasting and quality management decisions, as well as use visual and numerical tools to manage time and cost of projects. Prereq: MBA 605, MBA 606, and MBA 608. For MSA students - there is no prerequisite
    University Syllabus

  • MBA 633 Advanced Organizational Behavior

    This course encourages the application of advanced conceptual and theoretical perspectives to the analysis and control of behavior in organizations. Students will practice diagnosing and resolving behavioral and organizational problems related to management functions, individual differences, group and interpersonal conflict, and work/life interface. Includes emphasis on perception, motivation, leadership, influence, work/family balance, stress, decision-making, diversity, organizational learning, ethics, global issues and change. Prereq: MBA 605, 606, and 608. For MAQC students - MBA 600 and MBA 610.
    University Syllabus

  • MBA 652 Marketing Strategy

    This course examines the key concepts and issues in developing and selecting marketing strategies. Developing and implementing dynamic marketing strategies that are adaptable to changing conditions are emphasized. MBA 652 students examine processes that enable the domestic and/or international organization to continually learn from competitors, customers and other stakeholders with the objectives of developing marketing strategies essential to both obtaining and sustaining a competitive advantage. Prereq: MBA 605, 606, and 608. For MSBAN students – MBA 608.
    University Syllabus

  • MBA 642 Managerial Accounting

    This course provides an understanding of management information systems used in decision-making processes. It is designed with a “hands-on approach;” encourages participation and interaction through the use of computer projects, case studies, and classroom discussions. Topics include basic cost accounting concepts and terminology, product costing and pricing, planning and controlling a business operation through budgets and variance analysis, and managerial decision-making using such techniques as cost-volume-profit analysis and variable costing. Computers and appropriate computer software will be used. Prereq: MBA 600, 605, 606, and 608
    University Syllabus

  • MBA 612 Financial Strategy

    Fundamental principles and practices relevant to a firm’s financial strategy are addressed. Emphasis is on conceptual foundations and analysis of how financial fundamentals impact corporate financial strategies and the efficient allocation of wealth resources. Topics studied include: key elements of financial environments, market efficiency, financial analysis, cash flow, incentive theory and practice, agency problems, time value of money, security valuation, risk analysis, portfolio theory and practice, capital budgeting, capital structure, dividend policies, options, global financial concerns, and contemporary financial issues. Prereq: MBA 600, 605, 606, 608, and 610. For MSBAN students – MBA 600, MBA 608 and MBA 610 or BAN 600. For MSA student - MBA 610.
    University Syllabus

  • MBA 626 Operations Management Strategies in a Global Context

    This course explores the operations function and the role it plays in attaining and maintaining a competitive edge in the domestic and global markets. It is an overview of how the operations function interfaces with marketing and finance functions to ensure demand for the organization’s goods and services. Emphasis is placed on how to acquire and manage necessary resources, and how to plan and control the transformation of those resources into goods and services. Applications in both service and manufacturing organizations are included. Prereq: MBA 600, 605, 606, 608, and 610. For MSBAN students – MBA 600 and BAN 600. For MSA students – MBA 610.
    University Syllabus

  • MBA 639 Strategic Management

    The purpose of the MBA capstone experience is to reinforce the knowledge, skills and abilities gained from the MBA program. The student will take the knowledge gained from the other courses in the MBA program and apply it to the development and execution of an organization’s business strategy. It will also provide opportunities for students to strengthen their portfolios with material developed throughout the program and to focus on particular needs that may have come to light during the program. Prereq: 33 hours in major
    University Syllabus

  • Any two 600 level AC, BA, MAQC, MBA, MSF, or MSM courses not already taken (all prereqs must be met)

Electives

The basic MBA is a 39 credit hour program. Accounting (AC), Business (BA), Acquisition and Contract Management (MAQC), MBA, Master of Science in Finance (MSF), and Master of Science in Management (MSM) courses are acceptable elective courses for the revised MBA. Consult your advisor for assistance in selecting your electives and scheduling your courses within your program in the first term of your MBA program.

At least 33 Graduate Credit Hours must be taken at Bellevue University

Concentrations

A list of MBA Concentrations is found below. Please consult your advisor for assistance in selecting and declaring your Concentration. It is advisable to declare your Concentration during the first term of your MBA program.

MBA program Concentrations include:

Accounting Concentration

The Accounting Concentration is designed to provide you the opportunity to explore advanced topics in the accounting field. This Concentration alone will not qualify you to sit for the CPA exam. If you are planning to sit for the CPA examination, you should check with your faculty advisor to ensure you will have completed the requirements as outlined by the respective state board of accountancy. You may take the accounting electives without pursuing the entire Concentration.

You must select a minimum of 9 credit hours from the list of accounting courses below and the prerequisites for a course must be met before you can enroll in the course.

  • AC 618 Accounting Theory

    This course looks at the development of accounting theory and explores its impact on past and current accounting practices. Emphasis will be placed on basic accounting concepts, including the conceptual framework APB # 4 and ASOBAT. Other areas of discussion will include the policymaking process, contemporary accounting issues, and international accounting. Prerequisites: AC 312

  • AC 619 International Accounting

    This course focuses on the study of current standards of practice in international financial accounting and a comparison of U.S. GAAP to practices in other countries. Emphasis is placed on understanding the importance of convergence of financial reporting and the adoption of international financial reporting standards, the role international accounting standards play in the global market place, and the impact of these standards on U.S. GAAP. The course also covers issues related to management decision-making in the global marketplace including transfer pricing, taxation, strategic planning and control. Prerequisites: AC 312
    University Syllabus

  • AC 624 Advanced Cost Accounting

    This course includes current managerial and cost accounting issues, such as Just in Time (JIT), balanced scorecard, Activity-Based Costing (ABC) accounting, strategic cost management, meaningful report writing for management, and quality and performance measurement. This course uses a “hands-on approach” encouraging participation and interaction through the use of computer projects, case studies, and classroom discussions. Prerequisites: AC 321 or MBA 642
    University Syllabus

  • AC 634 Advanced Taxation of Business Entities

    This course covers the creation, formation, and liquidation of C corporations as well as tax practices and ethics as they relate to C corporations. Also covered will be taxation across state lines, business tax credits, and international tax. Prereq: AC 331
    University Syllabus

  • AC 643 Advanced Auditing

    This course is designed to look at topics beyond those covered in basic auditing classes. Students study in-depth current standards of practice in areas such as fraud detection, internal and EDP auditing, and specialized attestation engagements. Also emphasizes the ethical, legal, and regulatory environment of auditing and theoretical issues. Prerequisites: AC 442
    University Syllabus

  • AC 652 Accounting for Governmental and Non-Profit Entities

    This course covers governmental accounting and the various funds associated with non-profit enterprises including a study of accounting techniques as applied to federal and state governmental units, public school systems, colleges and universities, hospitals, voluntary and welfare organizations, and other non-profit organizations. Students will be expected to prepare basic financial statements for a sample government using a dual-track computerized accounting software package. Prerequisites: AC 312

  • AC 661 Seminar in Contemporary Accounting: Selected Topics

    This course covers special topics of financial accounting, auditing, tax, or managerial accounting. The specific topic(s) offered will be listed in the course schedules for the session during which the seminar is offered. This class is offered in a seminar format, focusing on discussion rather than lecture. Prerequisites: 12 hours of accounting
    University Syllabus

Acquisition and Contract Management Concentration

The Acquisition and Contract Management Concentration enables members of the federal acquisition community and its contracting partners to enhance their acquisition managerial practices. Additional emphasis is placed on understanding the acquisition process, as well as statutory and regulatory requirements.

Note: A Level 2 or Level 3 DAWIA certification for the contracting career field through DAU/FAI may be used to transfer 9 credit hours to the MBA Acquisition and Contract Management Concentration.

You will be required to take the following 9 credit hours:

  • MAQC 660 Business Decision for Contracting

    This course focuses on the pre-award business and contracting knowledge necessary to process complex procurement with an emphasis on the following topics: business relationship, strategic sourcing, risk management, contract financing, subcontracting plans, source selection, and contractor responsibility. Students can apply the knowledge learned to practical exercises involving acquisition planning, source selection, and award of technical support service contracts. Additional topics include service case communication, teaming and leadership, customer analysis, spend analysis, multiple award IDIQ, and formal source selection. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610
    University Syllabus

  • MAQC 670 Legal Considerations in Contracting

    This course focuses on the legal considerations in the procurement process with an emphasis on contract law, fiscal law, protests, assignment of claims, subcontracting, dispute and claims, fraud, debt, and terminations. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610
    University Syllabus

  • MAQC 675 Cost Analysis and Negotiation Techniques

    This course focuses on cost analysis and negotiation techniques and topics including cost analysis, quantitative techniques, indirect cost, accounting and est. systems audits, FCCM, profit analysis, and negotiations of acquisition planning, cost analysis, negotiation, and contract administration. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610
    University Syllabus

Cybersecurity Concentration

In today's cyber world, professionals need to understand the methods for preventing, detecting, deterring, and responding to real and potential cyber threats and incidents. The Cybersecurity Concentration provides graduate students with an advanced understanding of the technical aspects of information security. Students successfully completing this coursework will attain knowledge and abilities to operate and manage security technologies. Topic areas include security architecture & design, computer forensics, penetration testing, and information warfare. Students entering this concentration are required to have an established technical background and knowledge level.

You must select a minimum of 9 credit hours from the following:

  • CIS 607 Computer Forensics

    This course is designed as an overview of the investigative methods and tools associated with computer forensics. Topics include: processing crime and incident scenes, digital evidence controls, recovery of information, network forensics, data acquisition, and legal and ethical issues associated with investigations.
    University Syllabus

  • CIS 608 Information Security Management

    This course addresses the issues relating to successful information security management. Topics include access control systems, network and software security, management practices, risk management, protection mechanisms, business continuity planning, and legal and ethical issues. The course allows for analysis of current security management models.
    University Syllabus

  • CIS 610 Information Warfare

    This course is designed as an overview of the fundamental processes associated with waging war in an electronic age. Topics include strategic planning and tactical analysis for target identification, reconnaissance, and tool selection. The intent of this course is to focus on individual, corporate and national forms of warfare.
    University Syllabus

  • CIS 611 Cloud Computing

    This course focuses on the architecture and security associated with cloud computing. Emphasis in placed on key drivers which lead to cloud computing adoption and issues associated with cloud computing governance. Additional topics will include infrastructure security, identity and access management, cloud services, data security and storage, and auditing and compliance. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing
    University Syllabus

  • CYBR 515 Security Architecture and Design

    This course provides an introduction to the fundamental components of security architecture. Topics include computer organization; hardware, software and firmware components; open and distributed systems; and protection mechanisms. Discussion also includes certification and accreditation; formal security models; and evaluation criteria. Assigned projects include designing a model secure system.
    University Syllabus

  • CYBR 525 Ethical Hacking and Response

    This course provides a technical study of offensive and defensive techniques for protecting cyber assets. Topics include security testing, risk mitigation techniques, and threat response. Discussion also includes penetration testing theory, techniques, and tools; network, systems, and application vulnerability scanning; risk analysis and response; and intrusion detection and response. Emphasis is placed on identification of system vulnerabilities and threats and techniques for preventing attacks.
    University Syllabus

Entrepreneurship Concentration

The Entrepreneurship Concentration is designed to prepare students to design, launch, and grow new business ventures, either stand alone or within an existing corporation, including franchising and outsourcing. High-growth ventures (e.g. technology) as well as socially- oriented ventures are emphasized. Consideration of the international dimensions and sustainability of new ventures are also highlighted.

  • MSM 601 Entrepreneurship and Business Plan Development (REQUIRED)

    This course is designed to introduce students to the entrepreneurial mindset, including the concepts of innovation and newness. Students evaluate a variety of entrepreneurial activities, including outright ownership, franchising, outsourcing and partnerships. Traits and characteristics of successful entrepreneurs and entrepreneurial teams will be covered along with aligning organizational design with the business goals, strategy and business model, defining key roles, core competency requirements & job specifications, and recruiting and building the team. The final project in this course is the development of a Business Plan for an idea of the student’s choosing.

A minimum of 6 additional credit hours are required from the courses listed below (or 2 of the 4 courses):

  • MSM 602 Entrepreneurial Finance

    This course will deal with the sources of capital for early stage companies and the implications of the decisions a company makes to fund its operations. It also explores issues in the valuation of ventures and how the achievement of milestones can impact that valuation. Venture capital and angel investors are also covered. Lastly, the course will explore accounting and finance techniques to monitor the success of the enterprise. It will provide the skills and techniques to manage the business by the numbers exploring methods successful entrepreneurs use to understand their costs and cost drivers, break- even point and integrating these into an activity based forecast for their business.
    University Syllabus

  • MSM 603 Creativity, Sustainability and Innovation

    This course covers promoting and marketing an entrepreneurial idea from its inception to the marketplace. The course is designed for exploring the unique marketing strategies required to exploit entrepreneurial opportunities. It will also focus is on issues surrounding companies with high growth potential, an interest in sustainability and the creativity needed to develop innovative marketing for these environments.

  • MSM 604 Family Business & Self Employment

    This course is centered on the single-person or family business and the issues associated with business transition planning. The course covers development and implementation of strategy for small businesses, and succession planning for the entrepreneur. It also covers valuation issues and timetables for moving profitably out of a business.

  • MSM 605 Small Business Operations

    This course is designed for anyone who is charged with managing the day-to-day operation of a small to medium firm. It covers planning, budgeting, payroll issues, business taxation issues and use of tools and techniques to ensure that small business owners can comply with established laws keep accurate records and produce helpful reports for managerial decision-making.

Executive Coaching Concentration

The Executive Coaching Concentration will teach the fundamental skills required to coach business leaders and managers. These coaching principles can be applied in a variety of contexts and settings such as business leadership and management. The Concentration provides an overview of the foundational concepts needed to prepare you to actively facilitate the identification, selection, and accomplishment of business goals. The courses are offered online including a weekly one hour telephone conference call. The successful completion of the three courses (MCL 650, MCL 651, and MCL 652) including a one credit hour internship (MCL 653) taken simultaneously with each course will result in a graduate certificate of completion in executive coaching.

External Professional Standards

External Professional Standards: Bellevue University is an institutional member of the Graduate School Alliance for Executive Coaching (GSAEC).

Unless noted, all courses are 3 credit hours

The mission of GSAEC is to establish and maintain standards for education and training provided by academic institutions for the discipline and practice of executive and organizational coaching.

  • MCL 650 Ethical and Professional Principles of Executive Coaching

    This course covers the ethical guidelines for professional coaches and professional practice standards. Topics covered include record keeping, dual relationships, and the current professional context and dynamics of the coaching field. Requirement - Must be taken concurrently with 1 credit hour of either MCL 654, 655, or 656.

  • MCL 651 Executive Coaching Communication Skills and Assessment

    This course addresses the academic theories upon which executive coaching is founded. These include the coaching relationship process and associated communication skills. It will also cover various assessment tools utilized in executive coaching. Requirement - Must be taken concurrently with 1 credit hour of either MCL 654, 655, or 656.

  • MCL 652 The Role and Relationship Dynamics of Executive Coaching

    This course will cover the role of executive coaches, as well as coaching relationship dynamics. A general model of executive coaching will be introduced and utilized throughout the course. Requirement - Must be taken concurrently with 1 credit hour of either MCL 654, 655, or 656.

  • MCL 653 Executive Coaching Internship

    This course provides an opportunity for students to expand their learning by gaining experience in the actual workplace. The learning objectives and specific program of study must be developed in consultation with and approved by the course instructor and the site supervisor of the intern prior to the start of the internship. Requirement - One credit hour must be taken concurrently with each of MCL 650, 651 and 652.
    University Syllabus

Finance Concentration

Financial knowledge and understanding is highly valued in the marketplace and the Finance Concentration provides an opportunity for you to further develop your knowledge and practical application skills in several key finance areas. Prior study is not required to pursue the Finance Concentration and you may take any of the finance electives without pursuing the entire Concentration. If you are interested in this Concentration, you should contact a major professor in the MBA area to assist you. You may take the finance electives without pursuing the entire Concentration.

You must select a minimum of 9 credit hours from the following:

  • BA 602 Risk Management

    This courses includes fundamental principles and practices of risk management and insurance with an applied focus on risk management processes rather than institutional and contractual details of the insurance industry. Topics include risk identification; risk characterization; pricing of risk reduction techniques; risk retention; regulatory, legal and tax implications; insurance; and other hedging strategies. Additionally, personal, business, and public policy perspectives concerning life, health, property, and liability risk management and insurance are addressed. Prerequisites: MBA 600, and MBA 610
    University Syllabus

  • BA 616A Investments

    Investment principles and practices are studied in the context of individuals and organizations. The course will integrate economic relationships and practices for an understanding of the current investment environment. Additionally, the course will survey the institutions and securities that make up the investment environment to provide students a history of how Wall Street operates. Students should learn to understand and experience how individuals trade financial instruments, including stocks, options, bonds, futures, and other derivative securities. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610
    University Syllabus

  • BA 617 International Finance

    This course will focus on international financial tools, applications, and concepts. Topics include fundamental international financial relationships and their application to firms and individuals, international transactions, tax issues, and multinational corporations. It will cover essential elements of transacting in an international market place. It also will address the fundamental risks inherent in international business and the use of financial securities to hedge these risks. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610
    University Syllabus

  • BA 620 Cash Management

    Cash management also may be known as treasury management, working capital management, or short-term financial management. This course addresses fundamental principles and practices concerning cash management. Topics include the role of cash management, credit, accounts receivable and collection management, accounts payable and disbursement management, electronic commerce, information and technology needs for cash management, forecasting, short-term investments and borrowing, international cash management, relevant relationship management, and contemporary issues. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610
    University Syllabus

Global Economic Threat Environment Concentration

The Global Economic Threat Environment concentration in offers students an opportunity to apply the foundational and theoretical knowledge learned in the MBA core to the global arena in several ways: in comparative perspective across regions along economic, political, and cultural lines; with specific area studies focus in two crucial global regions dealing with issues that are pertinent to the 21st century global economy; and in how strategy, leadership, and power apply and can influence the transnational economic environment.

You must select a minimum of 9 credit hours from the following:

  • PS 605 Green Security: Eco-conflict and its Challenges

    Examines how ecological and environmental issues are becoming ever more centered as political security issues for the global community and how the future of conflict may be founded upon deficits and scarcities within this area.
    University Syllabus

  • PS 610 Hard and Soft Power: Balancing Hawks and Doves

    This course examines hard and soft power as concepts, theories, and consequential implications in global politics. It will estimate the applications of diplomatic and military strength and the proper context and applicability of each in given complex foreign dilemmas.
    University Syllabus

  • PS 620 Transnational Crime and Corruption: The Dark Side of Globalization

    This course examines the complexity of international political economy, its manipulation, misuse, and role in the elevation, continuation, and worsening of conflict around the globe.
    University Syllabus

  • PS 650 Democracy, Ethnicity, and Development in Africa

    This course examines the complex, intriguing, and frustrating continent of Africa. Independence and democracy have been accompanied by revolts and mass atrocities; global development and aid has coincided with poverty and famine; the rule of law has been offset by human rights abuses and authoritarian outrages. All of these issues will be covered so as to document the present condition and future trajectory of Africa going forward into the 21st century.
    University Syllabus

  • PS 660 Democracy, Political Economy, and Human Rights across Asia

    This course examines Asia from the perspectives of democracy, political economy, and human rights. It will assess how political and economic factors in the region impact not only individual states, but also transnational relations with other regions like North America and the European Union. How the region’s ongoing economic and political transformation influences governance will be examined. How power interplays with other states on issues pertaining to conflict and human rights will be important. Finally, the course will look at all of these issues from a theoretical and philosophical perspective, asking if culture impacts some of the variations.
    University Syllabus

Healthcare Concentration

The Healthcare Concentration provides the non-healthcare professional graduate student with general healthcare knowledge. The intent of this Concentration is to assist personnel, in areas other than patient care, to understand and be familiar with certain healthcare terminology and requirements. This Concentration is recommended if you work in a field related to the healthcare industry. You may take the healthcare electives without pursuing the entire Concentration.

You will be required to take the following 9 credit hours:

  • MHA 624 Legal, Ethical, and Compliance Issues

    This course examines the multitude of laws, legal entities and compliance issues associated with administration within healthcare organizations. The complexity of ethical issues, both administrative and biomedical, is discussed in various applied medical settings.

  • MHA 626 Organizational Design and Delivery Systems

    This course provides students with a foundational view of healthcare delivery systems in the United States. Students discuss the formal structure of healthcare organizations and how costs, access and quality impact the delivery of care. Emphasis is placed on healthcare as a system of care delivery.

  • MHA 661 Healthcare Finance

    An introduction to healthcare finance, including management control processes, financial statement analysis, ratio analysis, variance analysis, and capital structure is the focus of this course. A foundational background of the economics of today's healthcare environment is examined. Prerequisite: Admission to the MHA program.
    University Syllabus

Human Capital Management Concentration

The Human Capital Management Concentration is designed to provide individuals with knowledge in designing human capital development programs and measuring the effectiveness of investing in such programs within the corporate setting. This Concentration is recommended for individuals who work in human capital development fields.

  • MSM 500 Management of People in Society (REQUIRED)

    This course focuses on the management of self and others with an emphasis on administration and interpretation of diagnostic instruments which help clarify behaviors and skills which influence organizational and interpersonal outcomes. It covers the context of management in the organization, skills needed to effectively work with people in organizations, such as emotional intelligence and the roles people fill on the leader- manager-innovator continuum. All courses in the MSM Core require a Manager Reflection Journal to be kept by all students to focus on key learnings and applications throughout the program.
    University Syllabus

You will be required to take MSM 500 plus 2 of the following 3 courses listed

  • MSM 610 Management of Organizational Relationships

    This course focuses on skill-building the necessary leverage skills to be effective on the leader-manager-innovator continuum. Emphasis is placed on structuring organizational efforts, staffing with diverse resources, establishing partnerships and other collaborative efforts and maintaining a cohesive organization.

  • BA 646 Strategies for Recruitment and Selection of Human Resources

    This course is designed for students who desire to understand and master the intricacies associated with the recruitment and selection of human resources and practices, validity and reliability in testing, legal and regulatory factors affecting selection practices, making employment offers, and practices to ensure equal employment opportunity and affirmative action. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610

  • MCAP 658 Measurement and Evaluation of Human Capital

    Many management programs fail because of poor metrics. We have mastered the art of ROI with regards to tangible investments, but often times fall short when trying to measure human performance. This course introduces participants to the concept behind designing a system that can measure performance and ROI. Prerequisites: MCAP 549 OR MBA 522, and MBA 541

Human Resource Management Concentration

The Human Resource Management Concentration examines theory and applications in all levels of organizational strategy, culture, and practice. Topic areas include human resource management roles and contributions in business planning and strategy, job value analyses, alternative work systems, recruitment and selection, fair employment practices, performance appraisal and management, compensation design and management, job evaluation systems, career development, health and safety, and employee rights. The topics include the study of specific quantitative and qualitative theories and methods used to collect reliable and valid human resource management data for decision purposes. You may take the human resource management electives without pursuing the entire Concentration.

You will be required to take the following 9 credit hours:

  • BA 636 Compensation and Performance Management

    This course examines current theory, research, and practice necessary to make effective strategic decisions in managing compensation and performance issues. Included in this course is a detailed look at contemporary compensation systems and strategies, job analysis, and performance evaluations. Also includes how to design wage and salary structures and benefit packages in order to be competitive in today’s organizations. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610
    University Syllabus

  • BA 638 Human Resource Law

    This course describes, analyzes, and evaluates legal foundations, cases, and applications of human resource law. Areas of law covered will include, but are not limited to, equal employment opportunity law, labor relations law, fair employment practices law, and compensation-benefits law. Human resource management practices will be considered within analysis and evaluation of laws, cases, and settlements. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610

  • BA 646 Strategies for Recruitment and Selection of Human Resources

    This course is designed for students who desire to understand and master the intricacies associated with the recruitment and selection of human resources and practices, validity and reliability in testing, legal and regulatory factors affecting selection practices, making employment offers, and practices to ensure equal employment opportunity and affirmative action. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610

Information Security Management Concentration

In today's cyber world, professionals need to understand the methods for preventing, detecting, deterring, and responding to real and potential cyber threats and incidents. The Information Security Management Concentration provides graduate students with an advanced understanding of security philosophies, concepts, applications, and management principles. The Concentration focuses on the practice of protecting information assets from physical, logical, and human threats. Topic areas include physical and operational security, human factors in security, risk management, compliance and governance of information systems, and business continuity. Prior study is not required to pursue the Information Security Management Concentration.

A minimum of 9 credit hours are required for this Concentration.

  • CIS 608 Information Security Management

    This course addresses the issues relating to successful information security management. Topics include access control systems, network and software security, management practices, risk management, protection mechanisms, business continuity planning, and legal and ethical issues. The course allows for analysis of current security management models.
    University Syllabus

  • CYBR 510 Physical, Operations, and Personnel Security

    This course presents an examination of effective security methodologies based on comprehensive assessment of threats and implementation of a layered system of physical and electronic protection. Threat identification, countermeasures, and prevention are explored.
    University Syllabus

  • CYBR 520 Human Aspects of Cybersecurity

    This course provides an exploration of the human aspects of Cybersecurity. Topics include human behavior and interaction; motivation and influence; and social engineering. Emphasis on the human element of cyber incidents in relation to protecting information and technology assets.
    University Syllabus

  • CYBR 610 Risk Management Studies

    This course provides an exploration of how organizations manage risks to information technology assets. Discussion includes the application of methodologies and models for managing such risks. Topics also include recognition of security threats and vulnerabilities and the analysis of associated risks. A systematic approach for acquiring and analyzing information to support decision-making in the protection of assets and the allocation of security resources is presented.
    University Syllabus

  • CYBR 615 Cybersecurity Governance and Compliance

    This course explores the concepts of governance and how it applies to information systems. Discussion includes the importance of compliance with laws, regulations, policies, and procedures as a means of minimizing risk through mandated security and control measures. Through this course, students also gain an understanding of Information Technology (IT) Auditing processes and principles.
    University Syllabus

  • CYBR 625 Business Continuity Planning and Recovery

    This course provides the student with an opportunity to identify the processes associated with business continuity planning and disaster recovery. Business continuity topics such as project scope and planning, assessing risk, developing policy and procedures, conducting business impact analyses, recovery strategies, recovery plan development, and implementation are explored. Disaster recovery will be discussed in terms of recovery plan development, implementation, and restoration.
    University Syllabus

Interdisciplinary Business

The Interdisciplinary Business Concentration is primarily oriented toward managerial practice and provides a generalist perspective across traditional MBA curricula. You will learn how to integrate theory and practice, apply basic concepts, and establish the analytical tools needed to manage a business in an evolving global environment. The Economics and Business Modeling and Planning courses in the Concentration, in conjunction with the core courses, will help prepare students interested in taking the MBA certification exam.

You must select a minimum of 9 credit hours from the following:

  • BA 623 Business Modeling and Planning

    This course introduces modeling as a tool for decision-making and planning. It provides the foundation to understand various analytical models and prepares students to apply them to manage and solve real-life business problems. Topics include: optimization models, network models, inventory control, waiting lines, decision theory and multi-criteria decision models. Large-scale problem solving is facilitated through software applications. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610
    University Syllabus

  • MBA 611 Economics

    This course presents fundamental micro and macroeconomic concepts relevant to managers and other policymakers in business and government. Students are challenged to recognize, apply, and assess these concepts to decision making in business management and public policy. Students address the applicability of economic concepts to themselves, businesses, and society. Concepts and implications fundamental to the market supply and demand economic framework are addressed with an emphasis on their application to the firm and individual. Additionally macro-economic concepts, including an overall aggregate model of the economy are addressed. Students are encouraged to take a holistic view of how economic concepts impact the firm. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610
    University Syllabus

  • MBA 634 Advanced Organizational Management and Theory

    This class encourages the application of advanced conceptual and theoretical perspectives to the design of organizations and the linkage mechanisms that organizations must develop to manage their environments. Students will practice diagnosing and resolving organizational problems related to the growth, survival, and decline of organizations. Research emphasis will be placed on how size, structure, technology, and organizational culture impacts operations, strategic contingencies, and competitive advantage. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610
    University Syllabus

  • MBA 665 Advanced Law

    This course is a comprehensive study of law and its application in business operations and examines the influence of political, social, and regulatory issues on the formation and interpretation of the law. Topics include contracts, negotiable instruments, bankruptcy, agency and employment relationships, and property concepts. Emphasis is placed on applying these concepts to business decisions while considering both ethical and global perspectives. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610
    University Syllabus

International Management Concentration

The International Management Concentration provides you with key topics, theories, and applications that managers and professionals understand and use in pursuing international business goals and activities. If you are interested in pursuing this Concentration, you should contact a major professor in the MBA area for assistance. You may take any of the international management electives without pursuing the entire Concentration.

You must select a minimum of 9 credit hours from the following:

  • BA 617 International Finance

    This course will focus on international financial tools, applications, and concepts. Topics include fundamental international financial relationships and their application to firms and individuals, international transactions, tax issues, and multinational corporations. It will cover essential elements of transacting in an international market place. It also will address the fundamental risks inherent in international business and the use of financial securities to hedge these risks. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610
    University Syllabus

  • BA 637 International and Global Business

    This course surveys international and global business issues, processes, and strategies. The course describes and assesses (a) issues that surround business and market opportunities, such as cultural, economic, legal, political, and technological differences, (b) international trade and monetary systems, and (c) strategies, structures, and processes used by successful international and/or global businesses and organizations. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610
    University Syllabus

  • BA 656 International Consumer Analysis

    This course provides a review of the classical areas of perceptions, cognition, attitudinal formation, and cultural influences that affect individual and group purchasing behaviors. Emphasis is placed on understanding marketplace dynamics, market segmentation, and understanding the importance of psychographics in market planning analysis. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610 and MBA 652
    University Syllabus

  • MBA 667 Regulation and Ethics for International Business

    This course is an examination of the basic categories of regulations and laws to develop the framework within which organizations operate in the global economy. The international framework will be contrasted with the one constraining domestic operations. Skills in making ethical, strategic decisions within this framework will be developed through comprehensive international case problems. Ethical and moral analysis will examine issues in human rights, environmental considerations, investment, and social responsibility considerations. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610
    University Syllabus

Management Concentration

This concentration is only available if you are a Master of Arts in Management (MAM) graduate from Bellevue University. MAM graduates are required to take the following 8 courses (24 credit hours) in the MBA to obtain a second Master's degree. MAM graduates with an undergraduate in Accounting can have MBA 600 waived and then only 7 courses (or 21 credit hours) are required for an MBA.

  • MBA 600 Survey of Accounting

    Survey of Accounting is designed to provide students with an overall understanding of the manner in which business gathers, processes and uses information. Students are introduced to basic accounting and computer concepts and procedures through case studies and computer projects. Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of basic accounting processes and principles, on data management in a computerized environment, and on the basic financial statements. Students are also expected to develop an appreciation of the needs for internal controls in a business. Issues relating to internal control procedures, computer security, privacy issues and ethics will be introduced through readings and case studies. Prereq: Graduate Standing
    University Syllabus

  • MBA 606 Critical Thinking & Applied Problem Solving

    This course examines the use of critical thinking methods, mental models, and qualitative and quantitative decision making and problem solving methods to shape successful organizations. Emphasis is placed on the role of judgment development and how experience, research, knowledge, and group dynamics can lead to quality business analysis and shape effective decisions. Prereq: Graduate Standing
    University Syllabus

  • MBA 608 Capitalism & Economic Reasoning

    This course reviews the history of capitalism, with a focus on the modern implications of American Capitalism to business and policy decision-making today. It also explores competing systems and compares the economic, political, and personal freedoms that define our market-based system in relation to others. The course will use both focused and integrative analyses of key micro- and macroeconomic, accounting, finance, and marketing concepts, and their role in shaping the creation and growth of American business enterprises, and in defining and measuring their success. Students will begin the journey of learning how to reason like an economist and understand system impact in their analysis, decision making, and judgment making. Prereq: MBA 605 and MBA 606. For MSBAN students – No prerequisite required.
    University Syllabus

  • MBA 612 Financial Strategy

    Fundamental principles and practices relevant to a firm’s financial strategy are addressed. Emphasis is on conceptual foundations and analysis of how financial fundamentals impact corporate financial strategies and the efficient allocation of wealth resources. Topics studied include: key elements of financial environments, market efficiency, financial analysis, cash flow, incentive theory and practice, agency problems, time value of money, security valuation, risk analysis, portfolio theory and practice, capital budgeting, capital structure, dividend policies, options, global financial concerns, and contemporary financial issues. Prereq: MBA 600, 605, 606, 608, and 610. For MSBAN students – MBA 600, MBA 608 and MBA 610 or BAN 600. For MSA student - MBA 610.
    University Syllabus

  • MBA 626 Operations Management Strategies in a Global Context

    This course explores the operations function and the role it plays in attaining and maintaining a competitive edge in the domestic and global markets. It is an overview of how the operations function interfaces with marketing and finance functions to ensure demand for the organization’s goods and services. Emphasis is placed on how to acquire and manage necessary resources, and how to plan and control the transformation of those resources into goods and services. Applications in both service and manufacturing organizations are included. Prereq: MBA 600, 605, 606, 608, and 610. For MSBAN students – MBA 600 and BAN 600. For MSA students – MBA 610.
    University Syllabus

  • MBA 642 Managerial Accounting

    This course provides an understanding of management information systems used in decision-making processes. It is designed with a “hands-on approach;” encourages participation and interaction through the use of computer projects, case studies, and classroom discussions. Topics include basic cost accounting concepts and terminology, product costing and pricing, planning and controlling a business operation through budgets and variance analysis, and managerial decision-making using such techniques as cost-volume-profit analysis and variable costing. Computers and appropriate computer software will be used. Prereq: MBA 600, 605, 606, and 608
    University Syllabus

  • MBA 652 Marketing Strategy

    This course examines the key concepts and issues in developing and selecting marketing strategies. Developing and implementing dynamic marketing strategies that are adaptable to changing conditions are emphasized. MBA 652 students examine processes that enable the domestic and/or international organization to continually learn from competitors, customers and other stakeholders with the objectives of developing marketing strategies essential to both obtaining and sustaining a competitive advantage. Prereq: MBA 605, 606, and 608. For MSBAN students – MBA 608.
    University Syllabus

  • MBA 639 Strategic Management

    The purpose of the MBA capstone experience is to reinforce the knowledge, skills and abilities gained from the MBA program. The student will take the knowledge gained from the other courses in the MBA program and apply it to the development and execution of an organization’s business strategy. It will also provide opportunities for students to strengthen their portfolios with material developed throughout the program and to focus on particular needs that may have come to light during the program. Prereq: 33 hours in major
    University Syllabus

Management Information Systems Concentration

The Management Information Systems Concentration is designed to explore topics in the Computer Information Systems field. If you are a Non-Computer Information Systems undergraduate major, you can enhance your understanding of the CIS area through this Concentration with limited coursework in Computer Information Systems at the undergraduate level. If you wish to take the Management Information Systems Concentration, you should contact a major professor in the MBA or Computer Information Systems area for assistance. You may take the management information systems electives without pursuing the entire Concentration.

All courses are 3 credit hours

You must select a minimum of 9 credit hours from the following:

  • CIS 520 Survey of System Development

    This course introduces the concepts for information systems analysis and design with an emphasis on structured development combined with an introduction to object-oriented analysis and design principles.
    University Syllabus

  • CIS 540 Business Telecommunications

    This course provides an introduction to the fundamental technical principles of telecommunications and computer networks. The business challenges of managing communications resources are examined.
    University Syllabus

  • CIS 629 Managing Emerging Technologies

    This course provides an exploration of emerging information technologies, including how to define them, how they evolve, their role in the technology life cycle, and their potential economic, social, and cultural relationships. Topics covered include disruptive technologies, successes and failures of past emerging technologies, and integrating emerging technologies into a sustaining technology system.
    University Syllabus

  • CIS 633 Information Technology Project Management

    This course addresses the complex and unique issues related to effectively managing projects in an Information Technology context. Emphasis is placed on the nine knowledge areas specified by the Project Management Institute (PMI) in A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide). Team-based and discovery-based learning methods are stressed. Development projects reflect actual problems provided by industry. A formal software project management plan detailing the process groups of initiating, planning, executing, controlling, and closing will be developed.
    University Syllabus

Marketing Concentration

The Marketing Concentration is designed to provide you with the opportunity to explore global topics in the marketing field. If you are interested in pursuing this Concentration, you should contact a major professor in the MBA area for assistance. You may take any of the marketing electives without pursuing the entire Concentration. MBA 652 Marketing Strategy is a prerequisite to all Marketing Concentration courses.

You must select a minimum of 9 credit hours from the following:

  • BA 655 Internet Marketing

    This course examines the nature, characteristics, and culture of the online environment to understand, develop, and implement marketing strategies and tactics for conducting effective online commerce. Emphasis is on the hardware/software tools necessary for Internet-based commerce, market segmentation identification, product development, pricing, direct marketing, global marketing, and the methodology to execute marketing strategy in a computer mediated environment. Prerequisites: MBA 652
    University Syllabus

  • BA 656 International Consumer Analysis

    This course provides a review of the classical areas of perceptions, cognition, attitudinal formation, and cultural influences that affect individual and group purchasing behaviors. Emphasis is placed on understanding marketplace dynamics, market segmentation, and understanding the importance of psychographics in market planning analysis. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610 and MBA 652
    University Syllabus

  • BA 658 Sales Management

    This course examines development, structure, and implementation of an effective and profitable sales force across substantially different environmental conditions. Strategies involving various markets, sales person characteristics, sales program design, and quantitative measurements are emphasized. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610 and MBA 652

  • BA 663 Global Brand Marketing

    This course provides a framework for defining brand equity and identifying sources and outcomes of brand equity along with developing a tactical guideline for building, measuring, and managing brand equity. Emphasis is on building a common denominator to interpret the potential effects and trade-offs of various strategies and tactics for brands. Managing brand equity between what happened to the brand in the past and what should happen to it in the future is explored. Students gain experience by creating brand strategies and developing a strategic brand audit. Prerequisites: MBA 600 and MBA 610 and MBA 652
    University Syllabus

  • MBA 664 Marketing Research

    This course is designed to provide students with a means to obtain information for more effective marketing decision making. The essential concepts of marketing research and methods used to conduct research to help solve marketing problems will be emphasized. Both quantitative and qualitative research methods will be covered in the course and how these two approaches are best utilized to address a variety of marketing problems. Students are expected to obtain marketing research data and apply it to a variety of actual marketing problems. Prerequisites: MBA 600, MBA 610, and MBA 652
    University Syllabus

Project Management Concentration

Select a minimum of 9 credit hours from the courses listed below:

  • CIS 633 Information Technology Project Management

    This course addresses the complex and unique issues related to effectively managing projects in an Information Technology context. Emphasis is placed on the nine knowledge areas specified by the Project Management Institute (PMI) in A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide). Team-based and discovery-based learning methods are stressed. Development projects reflect actual problems provided by industry. A formal software project management plan detailing the process groups of initiating, planning, executing, controlling, and closing will be developed.
    University Syllabus

  • CIS 644 Managing Project Risks

    This course is designed to teach the importance of risk management in projects and provide information about the tools needed to effectively assess and monitor risks throughout the project lifecycle. Emphasis is placed on managing risks associated with project changes and risks associated with information technology projects. Topics covered include recurring issues that lead to failure in IT projects, methods for addressing recurring issues, and assessing risk impact. Prerequisite: CIS 433 or CIS 633 or acceptance into the Master of Project Management (MPM) degree program.
    University Syllabus

  • CIS 663 Project Communications Management and Leadership

    This course explores communication and leadership techniques in order to equip project managers with the skills they need to deal effectively with issues relating to resources, stakeholders, global teams, and changing technology. Topics covered will include learning how to manage conflict, creating a positive team environment, running effective meetings, and managing successful projects. Prerequisite: CIS 433 or CIS 633 or acceptance into the Master of Project Management (MPM) degree program.
    University Syllabus

  • CIS 664 Project Management in Global and Virtual Workplaces

    This course provides a comprehensive overview of relevant topics in the area of global and virtual workplaces, challenges and issues in global project management, methods and tools for effective global project management and managing effective virtual teams. Students will engage in a virtual group project in order to experience key aspects of project management in a way that simulates real project management in a global organization. Prerequisite: CIS 633 or acceptance into the Master of Project Management (MPM) degree program.
    University Syllabus

  • CIS 665 Defining and Managing Requirements and Project Success

    This course is designed to explain the process of gathering requirements with emphasis on the successful management of requirements and its relationship to project success. Topics covered include requirements gathering techniques, identifying success criteria, and common reasons for project failure. Prerequisite: CIS 433 or CIS 633 or acceptance into the Master of Project Management (MPM) degree program.
    University Syllabus

Supply Chain Management Concentration

Companies of all types are interested in individuals who have solid business skills, decision-making capabilities, and a good understanding of the latest information technology developments. They are looking for leaders who have the confidence and capability to bring new ideas in the search for greater organization efficiency. As part of the MBA program, you can complete the Supply Chain Management Concentration. This Concentration involves the integration of business processes across organizations, from material sources and suppliers through manufacturing and processing to the final customer. The Concentration provides you with an understanding of the role that the supply chain provides in enterprise competitiveness and overall strategy. The Concentration helps prepare you for careers with manufacturers, distributors, logistics service providers, and consulting firms. The curriculum provides the required theoretical/conceptual bases and analytical methods for making sound operational and strategic business decisions. You may take the supply chain management electives without pursuing the entire Concentration.

You must select a minimum of 9 credit hours from the following:

  • MBA 670 Essentials of Supply Chain Management in a Global Environment

    This course examines classical and contemporary issues in managing supply chains in domestic and global environments. The capabilities that a supply chain must have to support a firm’s business strategy are studied. Students learn to analyze and assess the strategic role of the supply chain and the fundamental issues in managing them. Methodologies for designing and planning a supply chain are introduced and methods to apply them in supply chain activities are learned. Prerequisites: For MAQC students – MBA 600 and MBA 610
    University Syllabus

  • MBA 672 Models in Supply Chain Management

    This course introduces models to frame, structure, and solve decisions which pertain to various aspects of supply chain management. Students can learn how to apply these models and how to use the solutions in decision-making from a cross-functional business perspective. Through the examination of various models and benchmark cases, students will learn to recognize, structure, analyze, and develop decisions which have supply chain implications.
    University Syllabus

  • MBA 674 Emerging Topics in Supply Chain Management

    With the business environment constantly changing, new strategies and topics in supply chain management emerge continuously. This course is devoted to bring such topics to the foreground. It examines the emerging issues by evaluating their immediate and long-term impact on traditional supply chain management theories as well as other business disciplines and practices. Contemporary readings and guest speakers supplement traditional academic literature and textbooks as the topics are fluid and very dynamic.
    University Syllabus

  • MBA 676 Information Technology Practices for Managing the Supply Chain

    This course examines the importance of various technology-driven practices which affect the performance of supply chains, such as timely information sharing, reducing lead times, and reducing inventory levels, are examined. Software and products used in managing supply chains, such as Vendor Managed Inventory (VMI), are introduced. The advantages and disadvantages of each are analyzed, and students learn how they benefit the enterprise and how to propose choices for various industries.
    University Syllabus

  • MBA 677 Logistics Management

    The course provides students with a thorough overview of the Logistics Management concepts and their interface with other functional areas. Students will learn about activities involved in moving and storing materials and information through the supply chain. Course activities include developing and integrating models of procurement, transportation, warehousing, materials handling and information storage. Problem solving projects and assignments require basic knowledge of Excel and Access. Prerequisites: For MAQC students – MBA 600 and MBA 610
    University Syllabus

American Society of Transportation and Logistics (AST and L) is the premier professional organization that develops and administers the Certification in Transportation Logistics (CTL). AST and L began the CTL Certification Program in 1948, known as the CPA of the transportation/logistics industry. Normally, to qualify an individual must be active member of AST and L and have a four year undergraduate degree or three years of professional experience. The certification is granted to individuals who successfully complete an extensive series of exams covering logistics, transportation, and supply chain. You are eligible to receive the CTL without further examination if you meet specific academic requirements. Bellevue University is authorized to offer this academic blanket waiver.

To qualify, you must meet the following requirements:

  • You must have a BSBA (Bachelor of Science Business Administration) or BSA (Bachelor Science Accounting) undergraduate degree
  • You must have received Bellevue University's MBA with the Supply Chain Management Concentration
  • In addition to the 9 credit hour Supply Chain Management Concentration, you must have successfully passed Bellevue University's MBA 677 Logistics Management course with a "C" or higher. This course is a logistics course with a transportation emphasis.
  • You must meet all other AST and L requirements for the waiver which includes membership in AST and L.
  • You must apply for the waiver within six months of graduation

Tax Concentration

This Concentration is designed to provide a broad foundation in both personal and business income tax. These specialized courses are designed to provide the information necessary to meet the Internal Revenue Service's requirements to become a Registered Tax Return Preparer. In combination with required accounting courses and courses in business administration, the Tax Concentration provides preparation for a professional career in tax planning and compliance.

You are required to take the following 12 credit hours:

  • AC 633 Advanced Individual Tax Accounting

    This course covers advanced topics for the individual taxpayer including credits, AMT, passive activities and sales of assets. Also covered in this course are tax period and methods with major emphasis on working with tax laws, tax rules and procedures for the tax practitioner. Prereq: AC 331
    University Syllabus

  • AC 634 Advanced Taxation of Business Entities

    This course covers the creation, formation, and liquidation of C corporations as well as tax practices and ethics as they relate to C corporations. Also covered will be taxation across state lines, business tax credits, and international tax. Prereq: AC 331
    University Syllabus

  • AC 635 Taxation of Flow-through Entities

    This course will cover tax issues such as subchapter S corporations, partnerships, trusts and estates. The course will also cover tax planning issues, tax practice and ethics. Prereq: AC 331
    University Syllabus

  • AC 639 Tax Planning and Strategies

    This course looks at the tax impact of business decisions and is designed for the non-accountant. Topics discussed will include tax impact on investment decisions, tax practice issues and ethics. Prereq: AC 331

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